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Thread: OT: Book recommendations for child safety

  1. #1
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    Mar 2016
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    Default OT: Book recommendations for child safety

    Has anyone got any recommendation for books suitable for a 6yo with ASD (high functioning) that deal with personal safety etc.

    This kid has proven he would walk off with anyone! And would do whatever he was told...even though he’s hardly ever out of our care...it’s well overdue that we start talking about this!
    Sarah

    Aussies from Sydney, Australia
    Miriam 8yo Grade 3
    Jonny 6yo (Special Needs) Review weeks on Level C
    Elissa 3yo SC Level B (for preschool)
    Thomas 8mo

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Noth Park Colorado
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    Default Re: OT: Book recommendations for child safety

    I know the Myself and Others Simply Classical curriculum has safety components built in. I'm not sure whether they focus specifically on your concerns. Hopefully Cheryl or another user can chime in.

    Even if it's not focused specifically on your safety concerns, it might be a good supplement. Our ASD kids, even high-functioning, need these consistent reminders of manners and safety.
    Married to DH for 13 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

    DS10- Simply Classical 4 / Grade 3 Classic Core,
    DD8- Grade 2 Classic Core,
    DD 6- Classic Core Kindergarten

  3. #3
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    Mar 2016
    Location
    NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: OT: Book recommendations for child safety

    Thanks Michelle.

    I wasn’t very specific in my question. We are using Myself and Others (which is great)...but I’m thinking of safety in regards to keeping safe from sexual abuse. When my eldest was 4 I read her a page of a book from the library...and she got the idea, we’ve had follow up chats since. She’s also had ‘the birds and the bees’ talk, as her body is developing (really early) and we’ve just talked about things, that all went really naturally and she keeps coming back with questions and telling me about the feelings that she has for the boys from church/her friends brothers. I really need to get her a book she can read too...but back to the matter at hand.

    For Jonathan I want to get a book to talk to him about safe touching etc...and when I looked at google/Amazon there were heaps and I thought I bet someone on this forum will know a good one!

    Jonathan will do whatever he is told...he knows about stranger danger, but I’m still not sure that if someone told him to go with them that he wouldn’t. An elderly lady from church came around a few weeks ago, and she got a bit funny (she’s a bit forgetful) and was wanting to take him back to her place so he could watch tv (he was complaining about not being able to watch a show he likes). I told her no, but needed to say it a number of times...she told him ok Jonathan, go get your shoes.’ And he went to get them straightaway! I was a little shocked. We talked about it of course. And I realised how difficult it was for him to understand. We clearly like this elderly lady. She is welcome in our home and we see her twice a week at church...but here I am saying I don’t trust him to go to her house (he is hardly ever out of our care, it’s not like he goes to other people’s places like that normally). That’s a bit funny when you think it through literally right! And she was going to let him watch tv!

    The kids are staying over at a (trusted) aunt and uncle’s house in a couple of weeks for 1 night (while we go away for our 10 year anniversary) and even though we trust them and I have no reason to be worried about my cousins either...it’s prompted the need to talk about this.
    Sarah

    Aussies from Sydney, Australia
    Miriam 8yo Grade 3
    Jonny 6yo (Special Needs) Review weeks on Level C
    Elissa 3yo SC Level B (for preschool)
    Thomas 8mo

  4. #4
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    Mar 2012
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    2,249

    Default Re: OT: Book recommendations for child safety

    Hi, Sarah. This is so frightening, isn't it?!

    I do not have any specific book recommendations, but we do include Safety throughout Myself & Others, as Colomama suggested. You can expand on, role play, or repeat any of the weeks that address the areas you need.

    You might also consider writing your own Social Stories (Carol Gray). These worked very well for us. As these incidents arise, you create your own little booklets to read and reread. (As you noted, a one-time mention will not be enough!) The advantage of a Social Story is that you can speak in the exact words you know your child will understand. This differs from child to child and, in your case, continent to continent.


    You can find various formulae, but the key components include at least these types of sentences:

    Descriptive Sentences – describe the social setting, where the situation occurs, individuals involved.

    Perspective Sentences – explain how other people feel or react to a situation.

    Directive Sentences – direct the child on what to do. Stated in "positive" terms, they are encouraging but direct.

    Control Sentence(s) - the child says what he can or will do


    Unlike the way we typically speak (mostly directive), a Social Story seeks to have 3-5 descriptive or perspective sentences for every directive sentence.

    Tips:
    -Include little drawings.
    -Be simple in your sentence construction.
    -Include only 1-2 sentences per page.
    -Include a verbal cue or form of self-talk that he can rehearse and remind himself in situations, such as "Say NO!" about improper touch or "Ask Mom or Dad," if someone asks him to go anywhere.
    -Read several times.
    -Role play by yourself or with stuffed animals if you can.
    -Revisit them in a way similar to Recitations: daily at first, then weekly, then monthly.

    We made ours hand-size, roughly 4x6 or 5x7 with little construction paper covers.

    Btw, we encountered this too. "Stranger" is often depicted as a person dressed in black, riding a black horse, wearing a black hat while grimacing. Our children need more than stranger-danger talks.

    Here is a sample for your situation.

    p. 1 Sometimes I meet friendly people. (draw people smiling)
    p. 2 A friendly person is someone who smiles and talks to me. (draw a nice person with a broad smile bending down to the child -- draw your own child)
    p. 3 I might meet friendly people at church or at the store. (draw church, store)
    p. 4 I can say hello to friendly people. (draw child waving, smiling, little bubble saying "Hello!")

    p.5 If a friendly person asks me to go somewhere, I must tell my mom or dad. (draw warning or Stop Sign)
    p. 6 If I want to go with the friendly person, I must ask my mom or dad first. (draw child asking mom, dad)
    p. 7 My mom or dad might say yes. My mom or dad might say no. (draw mom or dad saying Yes/draw mom or dad saying No)
    p. 8 My mom or dad will know what is best. (draw beaming, wise mom and dad)
    p. 9 I will always ask mom or dad first. This will keep me safe. (draw mom, dad, child)
    p. 10 Closing page - big loving, safe heart at the end


    If you want to include your faith, which most social stories do not do, but I often did, p. 10 could say "God gave me my mom and dad to keep me safe."


    I'm a little rusty on social stories. Someone could certainly do better, but this gives you an idea!
    Last edited by cherylswope; 10-22-2018 at 10:54 AM.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: OT: Book recommendations for child safety

    And she says she's rusty! She's good and this is why we love her.

    Cheryl makes a great point about stranger danger, it's usually not a stranger. I am our cub scout den leader and just had to re-take their youth protection training. The point they continuously made is that harm is usually done by someone the child and you know. Our children, especially our special kids, see our adult friends and intrinsically trust them as much as they trust us. It's difficult for them to distinguish safe from not safe.

    My youngest is a hugger. She feels the need to hug everyone that she knows. Preschool taught her to ask first if the person wants a hug, but not whether she should be offering hugs in the first place. Hugging our 95 year old neighbor lady? Fine. Hugging the local restaurant owner, no matter how friendly? No, not okay.

    Such a fine line for their little minds to distinguish.

    We have a stranger danger book, but like Cheryl said, the bad guy (it's always a guy) is scary in a creepy car driving through the neighborhood. I'm curious to see if others have book suggestions too.
    Married to DH for 13 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

    DS10- Simply Classical 4 / Grade 3 Classic Core,
    DD8- Grade 2 Classic Core,
    DD 6- Classic Core Kindergarten

  6. #6
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    Mar 2016
    Location
    NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: OT: Book recommendations for child safety

    Cheryl, wow! That was such an amazing answer, I love it!

    Social stories have worked so well in the past with my son, but I didn’t even think about writing one...wouldn’t have known where to start!

    Your ideas for one are so good. I can’t wait to open my box of pencils and get drawing and writing.

    Thankyou
    Sarah

    Aussies from Sydney, Australia
    Miriam 8yo Grade 3
    Jonny 6yo (Special Needs) Review weeks on Level C
    Elissa 3yo SC Level B (for preschool)
    Thomas 8mo

  7. #7
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    Default Re: OT: Book recommendations for child safety

    Quote Originally Posted by Colomama View Post
    And she says she's rusty! She's good and this is why we love her.

    Cheryl makes a great point about stranger danger, it's usually not a stranger. I am our cub scout den leader and just had to re-take their youth protection training. The point they continuously made is that harm is usually done by someone the child and you know. Our children, especially our special kids, see our adult friends and intrinsically trust them as much as they trust us. It's difficult for them to distinguish safe from not safe.

    My youngest is a hugger. She feels the need to hug everyone that she knows. Preschool taught her to ask first if the person wants a hug, but not whether she should be offering hugs in the first place. Hugging our 95 year old neighbor lady? Fine. Hugging the local restaurant owner, no matter how friendly? No, not okay.

    Such a fine line for their little minds to distinguish.

    We have a stranger danger book, but like Cheryl said, the bad guy (it's always a guy) is scary in a creepy car driving through the neighborhood. I'm curious to see if others have book suggestions too.
    Our kids are so vulnerable aren’t they. Scary that it’s often known people who do such things. We had a man in our old street who I was sure was trying to ‘groom’ my daughter. He was also very handsome and charming. Friendly and making us feel that we were the same as him, the two middle class families in a disadvantaged street. Even a really perceptive kid would have trouble figuring that one out! And he still qualified as a ‘stranger’!
    Sarah

    Aussies from Sydney, Australia
    Miriam 8yo Grade 3
    Jonny 6yo (Special Needs) Review weeks on Level C
    Elissa 3yo SC Level B (for preschool)
    Thomas 8mo

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Denver Area, CO
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    Default Re: OT: Book recommendations for child safety

    All of this is great information and of course we should all be cautious. (See my ID tags response, I’m just as paranoid.) However, I’d like to allay some fears here. Child predators are less than 1% of criminal perpetrators and — despite what we see on TV — they are fairly rare. 99% of child exploitation is cyber-related (most convicted offenders are caught with photos, for example, and have never touched a child). Further, children are almost always abused by a family member, family friend or another person (whether adult or adolescent) with whom they spend a lot of time.

    If you are with your kids 23 hours out of almost every day, pre-screen and monitor interactions, and pay attention to your kids physically and emotionally, you and they are going to be fine. This doesn’t rule out a catastrophe, of course, but the odds of it happening in your case are pretty slim. The vast majority of the people walking around on the street next to you are nice people who love their own kids as much as you love yours.
    Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
    Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
    Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
    Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

    “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
    ~Pope St John Paul II

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