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Thread: Guidance for Mild Dyslexia, Mild Executive Dysgraphia - LONG post

  1. #1
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    Default Guidance for Mild Dyslexia, Mild Executive Dysgraphia - LONG post

    Lots of questions coming .... so this is going to be a long post. I thought about just emailing Cheryl privately, but it crossed my mind that there may be other mommas with similar questions.


    Background, briefly. We've been going down a long road with having our boys evaluated for learning struggles. Long story short, we've finally bit the bullet and obtained a formal psychoeducational evaluation for one of our twin boys. (scheduled for his brother next week) My Thomas has mild dyslexia, as well as mild to moderate dyslexic dysgraphia with elements of executive dysgraphia. Dyslexic dysgraphia refers to deficits mastering the spelling patterns of words, while executive dysgraphia is broader -- difficulty planning and organizing one's thoughts, difficulty with syntax and grammar, etc.

    Currently, we're using the MP 2nd grade program without any problems. (but my boys are older than 2nd grade - soon to be 10) We plan to continue on with MP 3, with modifications.

    When I'm looking through the modifications suggested by our psychologist, I'm starting to hyperventilate just a little. We will switch back to Barton and work our way through it for holes in his phonemic awareness. She also recommended something called SWI - Structured Word Inquiry. I'll admit that I blew this off, as it sounded too loosey goosey for my tastes.

    The dysgraphia recommendations are the areas that make me the most nervous -- as we're heading into the period where writing really ramps up. More time allowed for written work, shortening tests, graphic organizers, scribing, etc were mentioned.

    So --- here are my questions --

    1) Is AFF 'do-able' with dyslexia/dysgraphia? I have ZERO experience with this program. (my older daughter did Intro to Comp)
    2) Since we're doing fine and dandy with PL, am I assuming too much, thinking he can handle LC next year on a standard schedule? (meaning, not breaking it into 2 years)
    3) Any tips/tricks/ideas for managing NT kids + kids with learning difficulties? I feel like it's a three ring circus 'round here most days. Thomas does not deal well with noise, but it's hard to find a quiet spot in the house most days.
    4) Any tips for managing dyslexia/dysgraphia in a cottage school setting? Approaching teachers about accommodations, etc?
    DD #1 : 22, college GRADUATE
    DD #2 : 11 MP 6A, Cottage School, MPOA, and Delectare
    DS #3 : 9, MP2
    DS #4 : 9, MP2
    DD #5: 5, Kindergarten at HLS
    DS #6: 3, cutest caboose on the loose
    http://www.thekennedyadventures.com

  2. #2
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    Northern Indiana
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    Default Re: Guidance for Mild Dyslexia, Mild Executive Dysgraphia - LONG post

    Quote Originally Posted by DiannaKennedy View Post
    Lots of questions coming .... so this is going to be a long post. I thought about just emailing Cheryl privately, but it crossed my mind that there may be other mommas with similar questions.


    Background, briefly. We've been going down a long road with having our boys evaluated for learning struggles. Long story short, we've finally bit the bullet and obtained a formal psychoeducational evaluation for one of our twin boys. (scheduled for his brother next week) My Thomas has mild dyslexia, as well as mild to moderate dyslexic dysgraphia with elements of executive dysgraphia. Dyslexic dysgraphia refers to deficits mastering the spelling patterns of words, while executive dysgraphia is broader -- difficulty planning and organizing one's thoughts, difficulty with syntax and grammar, etc.

    Currently, we're using the MP 2nd grade program without any problems. (but my boys are older than 2nd grade - soon to be 10) We plan to continue on with MP 3, with modifications.

    When I'm looking through the modifications suggested by our psychologist, I'm starting to hyperventilate just a little. We will switch back to Barton and work our way through it for holes in his phonemic awareness. She also recommended something called SWI - Structured Word Inquiry. I'll admit that I blew this off, as it sounded too loosey goosey for my tastes.

    The dysgraphia recommendations are the areas that make me the most nervous -- as we're heading into the period where writing really ramps up. More time allowed for written work, shortening tests, graphic organizers, scribing, etc were mentioned.

    So --- here are my questions --

    1) Is AFF 'do-able' with dyslexia/dysgraphia? I have ZERO experience with this program. (my older daughter did Intro to Comp)
    2) Since we're doing fine and dandy with PL, am I assuming too much, thinking he can handle LC next year on a standard schedule? (meaning, not breaking it into 2 years)
    3) Any tips/tricks/ideas for managing NT kids + kids with learning difficulties? I feel like it's a three ring circus 'round here most days. Thomas does not deal well with noise, but it's hard to find a quiet spot in the house most days.
    4) Any tips for managing dyslexia/dysgraphia in a cottage school setting? Approaching teachers about accommodations, etc?
    Hey there! I can't speak to the dyslexia/dysgraphia but I can address question #3. Six of our kids have various levels of challenges plus my husband has ADD, is highly sensitive to noise and works from home. It's a constant balancing act when the needs or tendencies of one or two conflict with the needs/tendencies of the others. Some tips:

    1. Headphones are your friend (the heavy-duty, nearly noise-canceling ones)
    2. Use it as a chance to teach respect all the way around. Sometimes I tell my noise-sensitive kids to put on headphones because I know everyone else is operating at a reasonable level or need the chance to be noisy for awhile. Other times, I tell everyone else they need to quiet down so their sibling can focus on their work. Sometimes I let the kid who needs to tap or hum (sensory issue) do so, other times I tell him that he can't. That's his opportunity to practice restraint.
    3. Respect also goes for time that is needed for each child. I teach my SC1, SC2 and MP1 kids separately. They each get my focused attention and I remind the others "I'm in lessons" when they try to get me for themselves (I've repeated that phrase daily for at least three years). The others have to play at a reasonably quiet level until it's their turn and the older guys are on-call for the toddler once their independent work is done.

    Hope this helps a little!
    Jennifer

    2017-2018
    DS-13 & DS-14 (mix of 6M & 8M)
    DS-11 (5M),
    DS-9 (SC2)
    DD-7 (MP1)
    DD-5 (SC1)
    DD-3 (Preschool)

    2018-2019
    DS-14 & DS-15 (Novare Intro to Physics; MP9 Literature; Light to the Nations I for Medieval History; MPOA - Latin, Algebra I, Ref/Con)
    DS-12 (6M)
    DS-10 (SC3)
    DD-8 (MP2)
    DD-6 (SC2)
    DD-3 (Preschool Round 2)

  3. #3
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    Mar 2012
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    Default Re: Guidance for Mild Dyslexia, Mild Executive Dysgraphia - LONG post

    Quote Originally Posted by DiannaKennedy View Post
    Lots of questions coming .... so this is going to be a long post. I thought about just emailing Cheryl privately, but it crossed my mind that there may be other mommas with similar questions.


    Background, briefly. We've been going down a long road with having our boys evaluated for learning struggles. Long story short, we've finally bit the bullet and obtained a formal psychoeducational evaluation for one of our twin boys. (scheduled for his brother next week) My Thomas has mild dyslexia, as well as mild to moderate dyslexic dysgraphia with elements of executive dysgraphia. Dyslexic dysgraphia refers to deficits mastering the spelling patterns of words, while executive dysgraphia is broader -- difficulty planning and organizing one's thoughts, difficulty with syntax and grammar, etc.

    Currently, we're using the MP 2nd grade program without any problems. (but my boys are older than 2nd grade - soon to be 10) We plan to continue on with MP 3, with modifications.

    When I'm looking through the modifications suggested by our psychologist, I'm starting to hyperventilate just a little. We will switch back to Barton and work our way through it for holes in his phonemic awareness. She also recommended something called SWI - Structured Word Inquiry. I'll admit that I blew this off, as it sounded too loosey goosey for my tastes.

    The dysgraphia recommendations are the areas that make me the most nervous -- as we're heading into the period where writing really ramps up. More time allowed for written work, shortening tests, graphic organizers, scribing, etc were mentioned.

    So --- here are my questions --

    1) Is AFF 'do-able' with dyslexia/dysgraphia? I have ZERO experience with this program. (my older daughter did Intro to Comp)

    A: I have never taught ATFF either, but outlining seems to be a big component. The outline could be transferred to a large or mini white board rather easily ahead of time for oral instruction. Then the boys could copy from the board (or not).


    2) Since we're doing fine and dandy with PL, am I assuming too much, thinking he can handle LC next year on a standard schedule? (meaning, not breaking it into 2 years)

    A: Yes, this assumes too much. I would either proceed with the SC 4 plans for a second year of Prima or teach LC 1 from MP's two-year plan.


    3) Any tips/tricks/ideas for managing NT kids + kids with learning difficulties? I feel like it's a three ring circus 'round here most days. Thomas does not deal well with noise, but it's hard to find a quiet spot in the house most days.

    A:
    1 -- Headphones? If you find commercial-grade work headphones, you can create his own "office" preferably facing something that is not visually distracting. (Closed blinds, blank wall, study carrel)
    2 -- Library? Sometimes libraries are noisier than home, but if yours happens to be a quiet library, you might pack up portable work for everyone once a week. Ours has a quiet conference room and private study carrela for each student. (However, if the very thought of organizing for a day out of the house induces further hyperventilation, ignore this idea.)
    3 -- MPOA? Sometimes for the sake of the younger student(s) with special needs, the older ones can "graduate" to MPOA classes. This imposes a little more structure and accountability while improving productivity for everyone. The younger boys benefit from your undivided attention, and older students benefit from discussions with new classically-minded adults and peers.
    4 -- Any combination of 1, 2, 3?


    4) Any tips for managing dyslexia/dysgraphia in a cottage school setting? Approaching teachers about accommodations, etc?

    A: This will depend on your cottage school. I think you're with Angel? If so, she will work with you! If you can make it clear that accommodations are needed to aid learning, rather than an excuse to breed learned helplessness, teachers often can and will adapt. The key will be deciding exactly what to request. Maybe you could meet with the director and upcoming teacher in a brainstorming session ahead of time. [Are there students in the class that might serve as buddies? Would recording devices be allowed? Can someone take notes for the student? Are there technological aids that would be allowed in class? Could quizzes or tests be administered orally? If I agree to check half of his homework orally at home, could he be allowed to write only the other half? etc...]
    For the sake of ease from my phone, preliminary answers are given above. Direct answers are beneath each question with an A for answer.

    This is a difficult time, because you are transitioning from having two little boys with learning challenges ... to two older students for whom you must begin to plan more long-term. You begin to see (or at least consider) the desired "end" and wonder how best to help them get there. The good news is that you have helped them come this far. MP 2 is not easy work! They are reading, writing, calculating, and learning Latin!

    Remember, too, that you can customize with some MP/SC substitutions as further modifications, if you need them. SC Writing, for example, might be a good substitution or supplement for ATFF. Traditional Spelling One or Two might be preferable to the MP 3 or 4 level, and this could double as extra phonemic awareness lessons.

    Remind me, do you have current WISC testing? If not, this might be something to request from the evaluation, as it may help with long-term planning and might even relax expectations a little bit in some areas.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Guidance for Mild Dyslexia, Mild Executive Dysgraphia - LONG post

    Quote Originally Posted by jen1134 View Post
    Hey there! I can't speak to the dyslexia/dysgraphia but I can address question #3. Six of our kids have various levels of challenges plus my husband has ADD, is highly sensitive to noise and works from home. It's a constant balancing act when the needs or tendencies of one or two conflict with the needs/tendencies of the others. Some tips:

    1. Headphones are your friend (the heavy-duty, nearly noise-canceling ones)
    2. Use it as a chance to teach respect all the way around. Sometimes I tell my noise-sensitive kids to put on headphones because I know everyone else is operating at a reasonable level or need the chance to be noisy for awhile. Other times, I tell everyone else they need to quiet down so their sibling can focus on their work. Sometimes I let the kid who needs to tap or hum (sensory issue) do so, other times I tell him that he can't. That's his opportunity to practice restraint.
    3. Respect also goes for time that is needed for each child. I teach my SC1, SC2 and MP1 kids separately. They each get my focused attention and I remind the others "I'm in lessons" when they try to get me for themselves (I've repeated that phrase daily for at least three years). The others have to play at a reasonably quiet level until it's their turn and the older guys are on-call for the toddler once their independent work is done.

    Hope this helps a little!
    You bet --- do you happen to have a link to the headphones you use?
    DD #1 : 22, college GRADUATE
    DD #2 : 11 MP 6A, Cottage School, MPOA, and Delectare
    DS #3 : 9, MP2
    DS #4 : 9, MP2
    DD #5: 5, Kindergarten at HLS
    DS #6: 3, cutest caboose on the loose
    http://www.thekennedyadventures.com

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Guidance for Mild Dyslexia, Mild Executive Dysgraphia - LONG post

    Quote Originally Posted by DiannaKennedy View Post
    You bet --- do you happen to have a link to the headphones you use?
    We're currently using Harbor Freight's $3 special...hence the reason I say to splurge for the good ones if you can! You want the ones that will cancel out both loud and soft noises. A lot of them are made to block loud sounds while still letting you hear conversations. You don't want those.
    Jennifer

    2017-2018
    DS-13 & DS-14 (mix of 6M & 8M)
    DS-11 (5M),
    DS-9 (SC2)
    DD-7 (MP1)
    DD-5 (SC1)
    DD-3 (Preschool)

    2018-2019
    DS-14 & DS-15 (Novare Intro to Physics; MP9 Literature; Light to the Nations I for Medieval History; MPOA - Latin, Algebra I, Ref/Con)
    DS-12 (6M)
    DS-10 (SC3)
    DD-8 (MP2)
    DD-6 (SC2)
    DD-3 (Preschool Round 2)

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Guidance for Mild Dyslexia, Mild Executive Dysgraphia - LONG post

    For Cheryl (at your convenience) ---- highlighted some areas --


    3) Any tips/tricks/ideas for managing NT kids + kids with learning difficulties? I feel like it's a three ring circus 'round here most days. Thomas does not deal well with noise, but it's hard to find a quiet spot in the house most days.

    A:
    1 -- Headphones? If you find commercial-grade work headphones, you can create his own "office" preferably facing something that is not visually distracting. (Closed blinds, blank wall, study carrel)
    2 -- Library? Sometimes libraries are noisier than home, but if yours happens to be a quiet library, you might pack up portable work for everyone once a week. Ours has a quiet conference room and private study carrela for each student. (However, if the very thought of organizing for a day out of the house induces further hyperventilation, ignore this idea.)
    3 -- MPOA? Sometimes for the sake of the younger student(s) with special needs, the older ones can "graduate" to MPOA classes. This imposes a little more structure and accountability while improving productivity for everyone. The younger boys benefit from your undivided attention, and older students benefit from discussions with new classically-minded adults and peers.
    4 -- Any combination of 1, 2, 3?



    I'm leaning toward headphones .... we have a fantastic new library, but when we go there, the children just want to read. (imagine that!) My older daughter is in MPOA, but I have to eyeball her frequently to make sure she's on track as well. Argh.

    4) Any tips for managing dyslexia/dysgraphia in a cottage school setting? Approaching teachers about accommodations, etc?

    A: This will depend on your cottage school. I think you're with Angel? If so, she will work with you! If you can make it clear that accommodations are needed to aid learning, rather than an excuse to breed learned helplessness, teachers often can and will adapt. The key will be deciding exactly what to request. Maybe you could meet with the director and upcoming teacher in a brainstorming session ahead of time. [Are there students in the class that might serve as buddies? Would recording devices be allowed? Can someone take notes for the student? Are there technological aids that would be allowed in class? Could quizzes or tests be administered orally? If I agree to check half of his homework orally at home, could he be allowed to write only the other half? etc...]

    I'm actually here in Louisville, near the mothership. I can definitely meet with folks before school begins --- but that's making me a nervous wreck. I'd love to hear more from folks who have navigated this road of accommodations.


    Remember, too, that you can customize with some MP/SC substitutions as further modifications, if you need them. SC Writing, for example, might be a good substitution or supplement for ATFF. Traditional Spelling One or Two might be preferable to the MP 3 or 4 level, and this could double as extra phonemic awareness lessons.


    I'm planning on finishing up SC Writing over the summer, and maybe looking at the SC Bible version as well. With spelling --- the Barton system is reading and spelling, so I think we're covered.


    Remind me, do you have current WISC testing? If not, this might be something to request from the evaluation, as it may help with long-term planning and might even relax expectations a little bit in some areas.

    Yup -- she actually repeated the WISC-V --- nothing jumps out at me as being an issue there. Percentile rankings from 42 (visual spatial) to 70 (for both processing speed and verbal comprehension). Working Memory is sitting right at 50. Is there an area or subset I need to be looking at?
    DD #1 : 22, college GRADUATE
    DD #2 : 11 MP 6A, Cottage School, MPOA, and Delectare
    DS #3 : 9, MP2
    DS #4 : 9, MP2
    DD #5: 5, Kindergarten at HLS
    DS #6: 3, cutest caboose on the loose
    http://www.thekennedyadventures.com

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Guidance for Mild Dyslexia, Mild Executive Dysgraphia - LONG post

    Good! Verbal comprehension & processing are good strengths to have! If nothing jumps out at you, and if there was some (expected) scatter but overall average to above average, you're on the right track to proceed and modify as needed.

    For a few years after grad school I worked among 12 public elementary schools integrating students with significant special needs into regular classrooms. While some might attempt to "demand" students' rights, I found that the best approach was often to assure the teacher that we appreciated her time and efforts, that our accommodations would be accomplished ahead of time for her as much as possible (e.g., pre-made charts for behavior, pre-made note-taking templates or assignment books), and that our students would work very hard. Then we provided plenty of appreciation to those teachers who made it work.

    Similarly today we have a ballet teacher for Michelle with NO previous experience in special needs, but who is delighting in new-found teaching skills. In essence you will be educating the teachers for their own success.

    Teachers who are inspired to embrace, rather than resent, our accommodated students become our most successful placements. If you can identify one teacher or admin within the cottage school to be your advocate and ally from the beginning, that will help.

    We do need better support for our students within our classical cottage schools, so maybe your boys can pave the way. You can do this! Perhaps you can tell them we will happily promote their efforts as a model for others to follow.

    And, yes, of course you're near Louisville. It was Angel's location I temporarily misplaced!


    Take in the official recommendations from your evaluations, ask how they might be implemented at your cottage school, and see how it goes. We'll be cheering you on. Keep us posted.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Guidance for Mild Dyslexia, Mild Executive Dysgraphia - LONG post

    Quote Originally Posted by DiannaKennedy View Post
    Lots of questions coming .... so this is going to be a long post. I thought about just emailing Cheryl privately, but it crossed my mind that there may be other mommas with similar questions.


    Background, briefly. We've been going down a long road with having our boys evaluated for learning struggles. Long story short, we've finally bit the bullet and obtained a formal psychoeducational evaluation for one of our twin boys. (scheduled for his brother next week) My Thomas has mild dyslexia, as well as mild to moderate dyslexic dysgraphia with elements of executive dysgraphia. Dyslexic dysgraphia refers to deficits mastering the spelling patterns of words, while executive dysgraphia is broader -- difficulty planning and organizing one's thoughts, difficulty with syntax and grammar, etc.

    We are using Logic of English Essentials for my two with dyslexia. It's been a good way to remediate, while also continuing in their other subjects at grade level. For helping them, I bought them Chromebooks to help with any writing that they have to do, unless it's math or handwriting. It frees me up some, since I don't have to be at their elbow for every single subject.

    Currently, we're using the MP 2nd grade program without any problems. (but my boys are older than 2nd grade - soon to be 10) We plan to continue on with MP 3, with modifications.

    When I'm looking through the modifications suggested by our psychologist, I'm starting to hyperventilate just a little. We will switch back to Barton and work our way through it for holes in his phonemic awareness. She also recommended something called SWI - Structured Word Inquiry. I'll admit that I blew this off, as it sounded too loosey goosey for my tastes.

    The dysgraphia recommendations are the areas that make me the most nervous -- as we're heading into the period where writing really ramps up. More time allowed for written work, shortening tests, graphic organizers, scribing, etc were mentioned.

    I do a lot of modification when it comes to the tests and written work. I find it easier to allow them accommodations, than to be their scribe. I have five students, so time with me is portioned out between them. So, I've been known to cross of some of the questions on tests, allow speech to text, allow oral answers to questions that are complex, and offer extra flashcards when info is coming too quickly that they can use on a test. (I have one with a low working memory.) Because my oldest has been formally tested, these accommodations will follow her to college.

    So --- here are my questions --

    1) Is AFF 'do-able' with dyslexia/dysgraphia? I have ZERO experience with this program. (my older daughter did Intro to Comp)
    2) Since we're doing fine and dandy with PL, am I assuming too much, thinking he can handle LC next year on a standard schedule? (meaning, not breaking it into 2 years)
    3) Any tips/tricks/ideas for managing NT kids + kids with learning difficulties? I feel like it's a three ring circus 'round here most days. Thomas does not deal well with noise, but it's hard to find a quiet spot in the house most days.

    I feel like a three ring circus most days, too. I also highly recommend the headphones. They are a lifesaver. If I need to be working with my noise sensitive child, I usually have the other kids work in a different room that has a door. Then, when he is done, everyone else is welcome to move around again.


    4) Any tips for managing dyslexia/dysgraphia in a cottage school setting? Approaching teachers about accommodations, etc?
    If your child has accommodations needed, make sure the teacher has them well ahead of time. It is also useful to have the psychologist list them out so that a teacher can see them, instead of a wordy 12 page report.
    We paid a little extra for a comprehensive list of accommodations added to the end of the report to help facilitate a school in helping our dd. I hope some of this helps. My 15yo was just diagnosed with severe dyslexia, adhd, low processing speed, poor working memory, and a few other things. With her detailed report, she'll be able to go to college, and be given all of her needed accommodations at any state college without issue. It's really a relief to know that this disability will not keep her from chasing after her dreams.

    Blessings,
    Lisa

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Guidance for Mild Dyslexia, Mild Executive Dysgraphia - LONG post

    Regarding tutorials or cottage schools, I wanted to post how a mom of twins in 6th grade addressed our cottage school at the beginning of the year regarding her daughters' learning differences:

    Thank you for contacting me and requesting this information. I am well aware that you have no obligation to attend to learning disabilities at HLN, but remain ever grateful that you do. Thank you (and your wonderful, sensitive teachers) for welcoming my girls (and their dyslexia!) with open arms. At the open house, we had a conversation with Mrs. R and within three minutes she had put my girls at ease. Her own experience as a teacher and mother are clearly invaluable and I remain impressed at the top-notch (and kind hearted) staff you have recruited. A and B left the open house feeling so much more comfortable than they anticipated they would.

    Here are some general accommodations that help them. They don't always need them and are pretty good at knowing when and how to ask if they do. There may be other things that become necessary at which time I will do my best to communicate to you and teachers as soon as I know. Additionally, if teachers see something that might be necessary, please always feel free to let me know. I'm happy to make their job easier anytime I can and it's possible they will see needs or have ideas that I don't since I don't experience them in a "real" classroom.

    You have my permission to forward this to any teachers/study hall monitors at HLN you think would benefit from reading it.
    No required reading aloud. They might volunteer, but if they can only read aloud in class on a volunteer basis, that is best.
    Taking photos of notes on board or of a classmate's notes. Because of their spelling/writing disabilities, getting content via writing notes is nearly impossible for them. If the teacher writes on the board, A will have an iPod and can take a photo. If classmates are taking notes, we would request either a peer notetaker (we could make copies) or that A be able to photograph a classmate's notes from class. If a teacher can identify a good notetaker, I'm happy to contact that family and ask permission to copy their notes. To be clear: they should take notes and do their best as it is vital practice for them, but on average, they seem to be able to get 30-50 percent of the content written down, so this accommodation would be for filling holes. They should always be taking notes in class when appropriate.
    Using voice to text when writing. This will likely apply more at home. On writing assignments they may use voice to text software and we would turn in typed/printed writing assignments (can tape or glue them in appropriate notebooks) if that is o.k. with the teacher.
    For tests, depending on the format, they may require someone to read the test to them. I'm not sure how applicable this is in their classes this year? It looks like most tests happen at home and we can read them aloud.
    For spelling to only "count" on final copies of work. We can help them get final drafts in good order at home. They will make SEVERAL spelling errors on first drafts or in-class work. We are telling them that's ok--writing is about good thinking and communicating and that once their ideas/content are "out" we (or technology) can help with spelling. We do expect them to participate fully in class and write as much as they can. Just know that their first drafts always require editing and then copying correctly.
    Being able to listen to any reading assignments. They have access to nearly every book in the world via a subscription to Learning Ally, which is designed for blind and dyslexic people. They can follow along in hard copies and annotate when necessary. They will be in study hall and I plan for them to knock out a good part of their other homework during that time and that will likely always include listening to their literature assignment. They will have headphones and they've been told NO other app should be open and that the iPod/ipad should be closed. Certainly, if you ever seem them using their technology for anything besides their accommodations I hope you'll correct them and let me know. We've been clear that they must use them correctly for others to understand their necessity. Once they open their book and push "start" there's no need to be touching their device.
    Again, not all of these are always necessary and usually what they need depends on the specific assignment. We will offer all of this at home, obviously, and can make more specific requests as the year progresses on an assignment-by-assignment basis if necessary.

    Please let me know if you have any questions.

    With gratitude
    signature,


    Angel
    Highlands Latin Nashville
    Angel
    Mom to 5 Teens.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Guidance for Mild Dyslexia, Mild Executive Dysgraphia - LONG post

    4) Any tips for managing dyslexia/dysgraphia in a cottage school setting? Approaching teachers about accommodations, etc?

    If your child has accommodations needed, make sure the teacher has them well ahead of time. It is also useful to have the psychologist list them out so that a teacher can see them, instead of a wordy 12 page report.
    We paid a little extra for a comprehensive list of accommodations added to the end of the report to help facilitate a school in helping our dd. I hope some of this helps. My 15yo was just diagnosed with severe dyslexia, adhd, low processing speed, poor working memory, and a few other things. With her detailed report, she'll be able to go to college, and be given all of her needed accommodations at any state college without issue. It's really a relief to know that this disability will not keep her from chasing after her dreams.


    Blessings,
    Lisa

    Our psychologist is awesome ..... she's got it all listed out for me. I'll be armed pretty well, thankfully.
    DD #1 : 22, college GRADUATE
    DD #2 : 11 MP 6A, Cottage School, MPOA, and Delectare
    DS #3 : 9, MP2
    DS #4 : 9, MP2
    DD #5: 5, Kindergarten at HLS
    DS #6: 3, cutest caboose on the loose
    http://www.thekennedyadventures.com

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