Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Placement guidance?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    35

    Default Placement guidance?

    I asked over in the K-8 board about a scope and sequence for this curriculum in order to figure out where each of my kids would place, but have been told that MP doesn't have one, so here's my post with my kids ages and issues and I'm wondering if this program can be adapted for my kids?

    My kids are a mess. lol I was hoping to find a scope and sequence or something that would allow me to see what skills are needed for each grade level. Is there nothing like that? If not, then I'll work on detailing each child's strengths and weaknesses, but there are four of them that I may use MP with.

    My 13yo is developmentally delayed. He's 1/2 way through Saxon 5/4 and doing pretty well, but really needs to memorize his math facts. He just became proficient in reading, perhaps around 4-6th grade level. He has essential tremors and would not be able to write. He'll need to use adaptive tech for any writing needed. I am just transitioning him to typing, but speech to text is best if you want it done in a timely manner. He gets easily frustrated, but is starting to mature and could probably handle a little more work. We've been using Charlotte Mason with him and he loves the extras. We are learning Latin, art, music, violin, handarts, along with science, 2 history lines (one overview and one focusing on English history), and geography. We love to read aloud, so have been going through 4-6 books a year that way too. Anyway, I've been trying to add in richness without pushing him beyond where he can work.

    My 11yo also has issues. She has memory issues and a very slow processing speed. She's about 1/3 way through Saxon 5/4, she's doing well, just takes a while to learn new things and remember them. Her reading has taken off this year. She's read well over 20 books since we began our school year and loves to read. Her reading speed has gotten better and I think she could come very close to grade level in anything except math. She's also been doing all of the above and doing well. She is very slow though. Not sure if I would need to pare down the assignments, or perhaps just take longer than a typical school year to finish. She has beautiful handwriting and can type like a professional. I've never seen someone type so fast. lol

    My almost 8yo is highly gifted in math, (He's currently also in Saxon 5/4 and doing well.) but can barely read. I think he would probably do well in 1st grade for the reading aspect, but he has hand issues and I'm not sure he could do any of the writing, other than the practice handwriting sheets. He still can't hold a pencil well. Not sure if he'll need adaptive tech or just a little more practice. I've had three boys and none of them could hold a pencil until they were in their teens.

    My would be 6yo dd is very smart with no issues whatsoever. I haven't done much with her this year, since CM doesn't start until age 6, but she's good in math, can hold a pencil better than my boys, has great handwriting, and could probably do well in the K program.

    So, what would you do with all of the above? Can this program even be done with all of these issues? Please tell me if I should just keep looking for a different program. What I really want, is a program that lays it all out for me. I'm overwhelmed enough without having to make my own lesson plans and pull everything together. This was my first year trying to homeschool all five of my kids and it went pretty well, other than I'm burned out and exhausted. lol (My oldest likes what she is doing and will not be using MP and I also have two grown adult kids that I homeschooled from K-12.) I'm looking for all the bells and whistles, with a good teacher's guide.

    Thank you all!

    Lisa

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,778

    Default Re: Placement guidance?

    Welcome, Lisa!

    If you do not already subscribe, we invite you to sign up for these free journals: 1) The Classical Teacher, which has a clear visual sequence of all subjects from preschool through high school, and 2) the Simply Classical Journal, which describes every available Simply Classical level with pictures of the components. Both magazines include articles for encouragement and inspiration along the way.

    At our Sodalitas Gathering in July, we plan to unveil our full Scope & Sequence for the Simply Classical Curriculum. In the meantime, let's start with your easiest and move upward chronologically:

    6yo -
    You write, "My would be 6yo dd is very smart with no issues whatsoever. I haven't done much with her this year, since CM doesn't start until age 6, but she's good in math, can hold a pencil better than my boys, has great handwriting, and could probably do well in the K program." Yes! MP K is perfect. Teach as is. You can keep it especially easy on yourself by obtaining the accompanying read-aloud sets.

    8yo -
    You write, "My almost 8yo is highly gifted in math, (He's currently also in Saxon 5/4 and doing well.) but can barely read. I think he would probably do well in 1st grade for the reading aspect, but he has hand issues and I'm not sure he could do any of the writing, other than the practice handwriting sheets. He still can't hold a pencil well. Not sure if he'll need adaptive tech or just a little more practice. I've had three boys and none of them could hold a pencil until they were in their teens."
    Option A: If he cannot yet read and spell CVC words, you can confidently place him in Simply Classical Level 1. He will learn proper pencil grip to keep his hand from tiring. He will write some, but we include non-writing (e.g., multi-sensory, gross-motor) practice for all of our phonics. Our copybook is simplified, so he practices writing in small doses. Order everything except math. Continue his math as is.
    Option B: If you look at SC 1 and think, "This is way too easy," take the readiness assessment for SC 2. If he can already read and spell CVC words, blends "st" and "nd" and "pr" easily, but just needs more explicit instruction, practice with decoding, and basic spelling, consider Simply Classical Level 2.
    Both SC 1 and SC 2 give you everything you need for a full year. As with your 6yo, order all of the read-aloud sets, the curriculum guide, and you will need nothing more. All of the SC levels come with a free 8-week extension for additional lessons, if the student needs it, before bridging to the next SC level.

    11yo -
    You write, "She has memory issues and a very slow processing speed. She's about 1/3 way through Saxon 5/4, she's doing well, just takes a while to learn new things and remember them. Her reading has taken off this year. She's read well over 20 books since we began our school year and loves to read. Her reading speed has gotten better and I think she could come very close to grade level in anything except math. She's also been doing all of the above and doing well. She is very slow though. Not sure if I would need to pare down the assignments, or perhaps just take longer than a typical school year to finish. She has beautiful handwriting and can type like a professional."
    Option A: Take the online assessment for SC 3. The American history read-alouds can be her readers while doubling for American history studies. Likewise, she will be able to read The Story Bible, our core resource in Christian studies. We work hard on memory and processing in SC 3. In SC 3, she practices composition through American History and will begin Latin the second half of SC 3.
    Option B: If SC 3 seems far too easy, consider MP 3.

    Either way, you can keep your math, if you like it. If not, here is the scope & sequence for our math program in both MP & SC.

    13yo -
    You write that he is "developmentally delayed. He's 1/2 way through Saxon 5/4 and doing pretty well, but really needs to memorize his math facts. He just became proficient in reading, perhaps around 4-6th grade level. He has essential tremors and would not be able to write. He'll need to use adaptive tech for any writing needed. I am just transitioning him to typing, but speech to text is best if you want it done in a timely manner. He gets easily frustrated, but is starting to mature and could probably handle a little more work. We've been using Charlotte Mason with him and he loves the extras. We are learning Latin, art, music, violin, handarts, along with science, 2 history lines (one overview and one focusing on English history), and geography. We love to read aloud, so have been going through 4-6 books a year that way too. Anyway, I've been trying to add in richness without pushing him beyond where he can work."

    First, I must say congratulations on all that you have done so far. I know how much time and effort you expended combining so many different elements into one year!
    Option A: If he works well with your 11yo, you could combine them in SC 3 or MP 3.
    Option B: If MP 3 would be beneath his abilities, or if he would not work well with your 11yo, you could look at either MP 4 which is available now or SC 4, which releases soon.

    As with your 11yo, you could keep his math program or switch to R&S arithmetic, which focuses on mastery of those math facts. (A tip: If you keep his current math program, you will want a good plan for improving automaticity of math facts before he hits 6/5.) As with our phonics, we build in review of math facts in our SC levels.


    Let us know if we can help to clarify anything further or help you decide.

    Thanks-
    Cheryl
    Last edited by cherylswope; 01-15-2018 at 05:10 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Placement guidance?

    [QUOTE=cherylswope;66560]Welcome, Lisa!

    If you do not already subscribe, we invite you to sign up for these free journals: 1) The Classical Teacher, which has a clear visual sequence of all subjects from preschool through high school, and 2) the Simply Classical Journal, which describes every available Simply Classical level with pictures of the components. Both magazines include articles for encouragement and inspiration along the way.

    Thank you! I had subscribed to the first magazine, but didn't know about the Simply Classical one. I've signed up and look forward to the first one.




    8yo -
    You write, "My almost 8yo is highly gifted in math, (He's currently also in Saxon 5/4 and doing well.) but can barely read. I think he would probably do well in 1st grade for the reading aspect, but he has hand issues and I'm not sure he could do any of the writing, other than the practice handwriting sheets. He still can't hold a pencil well. Not sure if he'll need adaptive tech or just a little more practice. I've had three boys and none of them could hold a pencil until they were in their teens."
    Option A: If he cannot yet read and spell CVC words, you can confidently place him in Simply Classical Level 1. He will learn proper pencil grip to keep his hand from tiring. He will write some, but we include non-writing (e.g., multi-sensory, gross-motor) practice for all of our phonics. Our copybook is simplified, so he practices writing in small doses. Order everything except math. Continue his math as is.
    Option B: If you look at SC 1 and think, "This is way too easy," take the readiness assessment for SC 2. If he can already read and spell CVC words, blends "st" and "nd" and "pr" easily, but just needs more explicit instruction, practice with decoding, and basic spelling, consider Simply Classical Level 2.
    Both SC 1 and SC 2 give you everything you need for a full year. As with your 6yo, order all of the read-aloud sets, the curriculum guide, and you will need nothing more. All of the SC levels come with a free 8-week extension for additional lessons, if the student needs it, before bridging to the next SC level.

    I think SC2 might be a good fit. He can read basic readers, without difficulty. We've been using the "I See Sam" readers and he's on the third level which has beginning and ending blends. He'll finish the last set before our school years ends, so will have learned all sounds, I'm just not sure if he'll be ready for SC 2 or SC3.


    [/I]Option A: Take the online assessment for SC 3. The American history read-alouds can be her readers while doubling for American history studies. Likewise, she will be able to read The Story Bible, our core resource in Christian studies. We work hard on memory and processing in SC 3. In SC 3, she practices composition through American History and will begin Latin the second half of SC 3.
    Option B: If SC 3 seems far too easy, consider MP 3.

    My 11yo is reading at a much higher level than SC3. She's been reading 350+ page books, like Cat Warriors and Emmy and the Incredible Shrinking Rat. We read most of the MP3 books 2 years ago. The issue, is speed and memory. She remembers all stories with great detail, but can't remember math facts without a lot of extra work. She's been working on her second violin piece for the whole school year and will need several more months before she has it memorized. She would excel at being a garden fairy. lol So, would she be better off repeating books that she's been through already, if it would allow her to maybe work faster? Or, should I move her to MP4 or SC4 for a little more challenge? Or even MP5, but done at a slower pace?



    13yo -
    You write that he is "developmentally delayed. He's 1/2 way through Saxon 5/4 and doing pretty well, but really needs to memorize his math facts. He just became proficient in reading, perhaps around 4-6th grade level. He has essential tremors and would not be able to write. He'll need to use adaptive tech for any writing needed. I am just transitioning him to typing, but speech to text is best if you want it done in a timely manner. He gets easily frustrated, but is starting to mature and could probably handle a little more work. We've been using Charlotte Mason with him and he loves the extras. We are learning Latin, art, music, violin, handarts, along with science, 2 history lines (one overview and one focusing on English history), and geography. We love to read aloud, so have been going through 4-6 books a year that way too. Anyway, I've been trying to add in richness without pushing him beyond where he can work."

    First, I must say congratulations on all that you have done so far. I know how much time and effort you expended combining so many different elements into one year!
    Option A: If he works well with your 11yo, you could combine them in SC 3 or MP 3.
    Option B: If MP 3 would be beneath his abilities, or if he would not work well with your 11yo, you could look at either MP 4 which is available now or SC 4, which releases soon.

    Thank you! Yes, it's been a pretty hard climb. We've worked through so many things and to be this close to being able to just buy a program and use it, is quite amazing. I never thought we'd get there.

    He does work well with his sister. They've pretty much always worked together. I figured that whatever my 11yo ended up with, I'd adapt for my 13yo. I just have no idea what he can do. I think I'll look over the samples online to see if I can adapt it well for him. I may have them both use MP 4 or SC 4. I need to work through each sample first. I do not want to overwhelm them, but if it's too easy, they will also balk. Such a hard decision.


    As with your 11yo, you could keep his math program or switch to R&S arithmetic, which focuses on mastery of those math facts. (A tip: If you keep his current math program, you will want a good plan for improving automaticity of math facts before he hits 6/5.) As with our phonics, we build in review of math facts in our SC levels.

    Yes, the dreaded math facts are killing me. lol I've been working on them for so long that I see them in my sleep. Too bad they don't. lol If R&S had workbooks, I'd definitely change, but with my 13yo's writing, I can't change. (Virtual Homeschool Group has the Saxon books computerized. You can take an At Your Own Pace class for free and it has video lessons and all lessons on the computer. It allows him to work on his own.) I still work on fact practice with him though.

    Thank you for your help! I will continue to look through the website and I hope to order in February.

    Blessings,
    Lisa

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    1,086

    Default Re: Placement guidance?

    [QUOTE=Lisainjax;66567]
    Quote Originally Posted by cherylswope View Post

    My 11yo is reading at a much higher level than SC3. She's been reading 350+ page books, like Cat Warriors and Emmy and the Incredible Shrinking Rat. We read most of the MP3 books 2 years ago. The issue, is speed and memory. She remembers all stories with great detail, but can't remember math facts without a lot of extra work. She's been working on her second violin piece for the whole school year and will need several more months before she has it memorized. She would excel at being a garden fairy. lol So, would she be better off repeating books that she's been through already, if it would allow her to maybe work faster? Or, should I move her to MP4 or SC4 for a little more challenge? Or even MP5, but done at a slower pace?



    Blessings,
    Lisa
    I hear you say that you are interested in helping her gain some speed in her reading/processing. You can continue having her read the books she wants for "pleasure", but try books that are lower levels for teaching! Just a note. My daughter (who is only 8) seems to be able to read much higher than her actual decoding skills. While not a "gifted" child, she does have above average intelligence and some how she infers words and can "read" them. It turns out she isn't really reading them, but guessing her way through entire passages. At least, it was that way until we went way lower in her teaching level. She can read 3rd grade books, but not alone. She skips words and lines if I do not read along with her. I found that the beginning 2nd grade seems to be the level in which we can teach at. She is developing many other skills. She would be mentally exhausted (she too suffers from memory issues) to have to read 3rd grade books, then do all the writing, comprehension, etc.
    Christine
    (2016-2017)
    DD (8/09) SC2
    DS (9/11) SC-C
    DD (2/13) - soaking it all up!

    (2017-2018)
    DD (8/09) SC3
    DS (9/11) SC1
    DD (2/13) -still soaking it up, using Jr. K workbooks and R&S workbooks

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,778

    Default Re: Placement guidance?

    Yes, to affirm Howiecram's point, it is best to err on placement at a slightly lower level that you can accelerate or supplement -- whether MP or SC -- than in a frustratingly challenging level for which the student lacks pre-requisites.

    Much to ponder! All MP and SC levels are fully customizable up or down by subjects, so we can certainly find something that will streamline your homeschool.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,778

    Default Re: Placement guidance?

    Do any of your boys qualify for OT? If yes, this might be a good support for you and for them.

    Also, just so you know, R&S books can be written in. No need to transfer or rewrite problems. My daughter's dysgraphia & tremor presented similar challenges for us as the ones you describe, so she solved problems directly into the R&S books.

    Did you happen to read MaggieAnnie's post? Her children are like yours in some ways: older, strong in some academic areas, accustomed to working hard. She takes higher MP Cores and teaches as written, unless adaptations are necessary, and provides -- as she mentions in her signature -- "remediation/support" along the way. She still has all of the lesson plans and resources at her fingertips, but with the freedom to individualize if needed. With everything you have already accomplished, I envision you doing something similar with great success.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: Placement guidance?

    Quote Originally Posted by cherylswope View Post
    Do any of your boys qualify for OT? If yes, this might be a good support for you and for them.

    Also, just so you know, R&S books can be written in. No need to transfer or rewrite problems. My daughter's dysgraphia & tremor presented similar challenges for us as the ones you describe, so she solved problems directly into the R&S books.

    Did you happen to read MaggieAnnie's post? Her children are like yours in some ways: older, strong in some academic areas, accustomed to working hard. She takes higher MP Cores and teaches as written, unless adaptations are necessary, and provides -- as she mentions in her signature -- "remediation/support" along the way. She still has all of the lesson plans and resources at her fingertips, but with the freedom to individualize if needed. With everything you have already accomplished, I envision you doing something similar with great success.
    Our insurance doesn't pay for hand OT. We paid out of pocket with my oldest, and then I work with my boys using those techniques on my own ever since. Basically, I do everything. It wasn't so hard when there were only two kids, but those two are grown and these 5 are running me in circles. lol I guess that's why I'm looking for a curricula that I can use.

    I didn't see MaggieAnnie's post, I'll look for it over on the other thread. I am quite the master tweaker at this point in time, I just want to make sure that I buy the level that will allow for the least amount of tweaking necessary. lol This year, I started with The Alveary and tweaked it so much that I am no longer using any of the original material. That is what I'd like to avoid. It's enough just to homeschool the kids and I don't want to have to recreate the wheel each week.

    I appreciate all of the advice! I think I may just have to choose a level and be willing to move up or down as needed. I have enough kids that anything not used by one, will probably be used by someone else.

    Blessings,
    Lisa

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    152

    Default Re: Placement guidance?

    Seconding teaching from lower level literature books. My 9 1/2 year old reads A Series of Unfortunate Events books for fun, but guesses through a lot of words. He can even narrate well, but I know he misses a lot of specifics and nuance.

    We are doing SC3 with a different math. The literature selections are a good fit for out loud reading and especially for the analysis aspects. That skill can lag behind their fun reading skill. The amount of writing is not too high either.

Similar Threads

  1. Feeling like a total failure......need some guidance/support!
    By jsadowski in forum K-8 Curriculum Board
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 06-22-2016, 12:17 PM
  2. Standardized Test Guidance
    By GeorgiaMom in forum K-8 Curriculum Board
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 04-03-2016, 11:05 PM
  3. Need some guidance with the Poetry book
    By homeschoolmom16 in forum K-8 Curriculum Board
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 05-02-2013, 12:27 PM
  4. Need guidance with Latin
    By Cuzsooke in forum K-8 Curriculum Board
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-15-2012, 05:34 PM
  5. guidance on choosing curriculum
    By foronemoresoul in forum General FAQ
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-09-2010, 09:29 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •