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Thread: Sensory Processing Help

  1. #1
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    Default Sensory Processing Help

    Hi ladies,

    I'm generally over on the K-8 board but am hoping and praying for some good information. My 5 year old son was just diagnosed with sensory processing disorder. This was our initial visit with the developmental ped. The Dr doesn't believe my son has autism but does think there is probably some ADD and/or anxiety mixed in there. He said it's too early and too hard to know for sure because the sensory processing is so big (is there a better discriptor?!?) right now. We have a referral for occupational therapy and a follow-up appt with the developmental ped in 6 months. Having a label on our troubles feels a little surreal and I'm still working through some of my own emotions about this. So here are some of my questions so far:

    1. What are some good resources for learning about sensory processing?
    2. I was planning on repeating JrK with him this school year. (He's a young 5 and not ready academically, socially or emotionally for K.) Should I switch to SC? Why or why not?
    3. What are some strategies and skills I can work on now that will help lay a solid foundation for the later years?

    TIA!
    Heidi
    2017-18
    dd- MP2
    ds- redshirting K
    dd- 2 years old & scribbling on everyone's paper

  2. #2
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    May 2016
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    124

    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    I have one with a mix of SPD, ADD, anxiety and giftedness. All of that came to a head for us around age 4. OT helped A LOT. We chose not to medicate the ADD. We didn't want her on 2 medications, and the anxiety trumped the ADD here. To answer your questions:

    1. The Out-of-Sync Child and The Out-of-Sync Child Has Fun were good resources for me.

    2. This I'm not sure about since we're also dealing with giftedness in this particular child. She read early and well and likes challenges. Yet, her struggles definitely hold her back. I will say that if SC had been around when we were first dealing with this, I think it may have been comforting for her.

    3. My child had major anxiety around transitions, so we worked a lot on making them as organized and calm as possible and always the same whenever possible. Organization in general is important for ADD and anxiety. I don't know which way your SPD child goes, but mine was sensory-avoiding, so there were things like clothing, shoes, soaps, laundry detergent, etc, etc that upset her. We found clothing with smooth seams, removed all tags, used a detergent that rinsed completely with no smell left behind, etc. She still wears Crocs most of the time with leggings and cotton knit tops. She needed some alone time during the day and a very set bedtime routine.

    During this time, I set aside a time daily for "school" which was just learning to read, doing some math and coloring. She looked forward to it and relied on it. All of the things you do to set up routines now will definitely pay off later. Having a plan for the day helps everyone know what to expect, which is often a very important thing to an anxious child.

    I hope this helps in some small way!
    Gigi
    Gina
    Honored & Blessed to be teaching my children at home
    (since 2001)

    DS-sophomore in college
    DD-soon-to-be college freshman!
    DD-9
    DS-8

  3. #3
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    Jul 2015
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    Lafayette, IN
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    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    I echo routines! Also, when establishing them, don't expect compliance or for things to get better immediately! It takes my son, many, many weeks. (10+) to stop complaining about new stuff! (and by complaining, I mean, rolling around the floor screaming!)

    Also, he'll need plenty of activities to feed the sensory stuff. In between school, he'll need to work a few of those things (I think our therapist recommended 2-3x a day for 15 min).

    Lastly, on the curriculum front: How far did he get in Jr. K? What are your concerns with proceeding to maybe SC1 (instead of MPK). Is he ready to read, or does he need more letter sound work? If you were going to repeat Jr. K, it might be nice to do SCC, instead. You'll have most of the books already. You'll only need 1) numbers books, 2 )FSR A 3) Animal coloring Book 4) Nature reader 5) SC-C bible 6) lesson plans. I do think the SC1 plans would also work just fine for him, if he was ready to read! The writing has been reduced from MPK.

    We did SC-C last year and every time I tried to go "off curriculum" and add something, it was a struggle! We did MUCH better when we stuck to the plans, as written!
    Christine
    (2016-2017)
    DD (8/09) SC2
    DS (9/11) SC-C
    DD (2/13) - soaking it all up!

    (2017-2018)
    DD (8/09) SC3
    DS (9/11) SC1
    DD (2/13) -still soaking it up, using Jr. K workbooks and R&S workbooks

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    Good morning, Heidi.

    First, I am so sorry. The first diagnosis can hit hard. It can feel good to know your suspicions had merit, but it can feel daunting to know your suspicions had merit! You are doing everything right: thinking long-term, following up in 6 months, pursuing OT, and re-evaluating academic needs. Just give your mind/self time to absorb, as you go. It is not so simple as "I thought I needed to turn right, but I need to turn left." It is a new mindset. The good news is that your little boy is still your little boy.

    Here is a thread comparing/contrasting JrK and SC C. See what you think. Feel free to ask more detailed questions than the comparison might provide.

    And here is a good link for exploring SPD.

    Though you usually post on K-8, you are welcome to keep one foot over here too. We're glad to have you.

    Cheryl

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    Quote Originally Posted by cherylswope View Post
    Good morning, Heidi.

    First, I am so sorry. The first diagnosis can hit hard. It can feel good to know your suspicions had merit, but it can feel daunting to know your suspicions had merit! You are doing everything right: thinking long-term, following up in 6 months, pursuing OT, and re-evaluating academic needs. Just give your mind/self time to absorb, as you go. It is not so simple as "I thought I needed to turn right, but I need to turn left." It is a new mindset. The good news is that your little boy is still your little boy.

    Here is a thread comparing/contrasting JrK and SC C. See what you think. Feel free to ask more detailed questions than the comparison might provide.

    And here is a good link for exploring SPD.

    Though you usually post on K-8, you are welcome to keep one foot over here too. We're glad to have you.

    Cheryl

    Welcome, Heidi! I "keep one foot over here" as well -- sensory, anxiety, EF, and ADD. But other than that my kids are neurotypical...lol.
    Jennifer

    2016-2017
    DS-13 & DS-12 (mix of MP5 & MP7), DS-10 (4th for New Users), DS-8 (MP K), DD-6 (MP K), DD-4 (FSR), DD-2

    2017-2018
    DS-14 & 13 (mix of 6M & 8M)
    DS-11 (5M),
    DS-9 (?)
    DD-7 (MP1)
    DD-5 (SC2)
    DD-2-1/2

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    We have sensory stuff going on here as well, with my oldest and youngest, both boys - 9 and 4.

    I recently did an online course called sensory solutions. It was about developing and implementing a sensory routine for your child. It was helpful. I've heard great things about The Out of Sync Child and it is on my list to read. My oldest is dx with ADHD and anxiety as well. He avoids for noise and some touch and then seeks for proprioception. My youngest isn't diagnosed with ADHD but likely has it, and he certainly has sensory processing issues. They both are in occupational therapy - and it is wonderful.

    Routines are absolutely essential. Howiecran is right though -- they are often met with loud resistance. Making visual schedules is really helpful too. I made a morning and bedtime routine chart and I am amazed at how my youngest has taken to it. I'm working on one for our school activities. Especially with my youngest, he needs lots of physical movement interspersed with his "school" activities. Right now we are only up to 5 minutes of table time or so at a time. We're still working through SC A and using the R&S three year old workbooks. We say our prayer, then we do his recitation while he's jumping on a trampoline. Then we read a book. Then we might play with a exercise ball. Then go to the table for 5 minutes or so. Etc. I'm still figuring out the best tools to help him. My oldest has the same issues but he has more problems with emotional regulation right now than anything else.

    As far as curriculum, it is wise to delay K for one more year. I plan on holding off on K work until my youngest is 6. The way I see it, working on regulating his body, learning to follow directions, sit properly at a table and sit and listen properly to stories, and to communicate appropriately with words is just as important school wise as any academic skills. Unless he can do these things he won't be able to learn.

    Having a set order of your day is incredibly helpful. Also using first, then statements are helpful for my youngest. First we will do this workbook page, then we will play with the ball. With the "then" activity being a preferred activity and the "first" activity being a less preferred one.

    It is difficult to get a first diagnosis. Helpful to know that your suspicious were right that something was different but sad and daunting at the same time.
    Susan

    2017-2018
    A (9) - mix of SC 2 and MP 1, R&S math 3
    C (8) - mix of SC 2 and MP 1, R&S math 2
    G (4) - Simply Classical A, hoping to start SC B in the spring

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    Thank you ladies! I have spent the last few days reading and rereading your suggestions and links. The understood.org website has been incredibly helpful to begin to learn more about what is going on and how to approach it. It also makes me wonder about my eldest daughter but that's a rabbit trail for another day. It seems there are some signs of the autism and/or ADHD and possibly some anxiety. I'm trying to take it a day at a time. I've requested The Out of Sync Child from our library and am looking forward to reading it.

    As far as OT, is there anything in particular I should look for? We received recommendations for two places. Are there different approaches to OT?

    With regards to the JrK vs SC-C vs K vs SC1, making a decision on which curriculum has been difficult. He turned 5 in June and that is when we completed the JrK program. He was able to handle siting at the table with brief bursts of big movements to do his numbers and letters pages, recitation and a quick speech articulation practice (about 20-30 mins.) He can sit for a story as long as you don't mind the constant movement. The developmental ped did a quick intelligence test and he tested above average. He knows his numbers and the addition and subtraction concept. He knows his letters and letter sounds. He shows the signs of reading readiness, such as reciting the story in a book because he's heard it 18 million times. Officially with the school district, I don't want this to be considered his kindergarten year. If he were ever to enter a school setting and/or when he plays sports, I want him to have the extra year to develop. In my opinion, the K program has too much writing and moves too quickly for my son. I was planning to repeat JrK with additional Rod and Staff preschool books to make school four days a week for him. When I look at it that essentially becomes SC-C without FSR A. So maybe I should go ahead and have him do SC-C which would give him some new material and some extra practice. Should I try to do the enrichment along with the 2nd grade enrichment I am already doing?

    Thank you for the reminders about routines. We have spent the summer working on our morning and bedtime routine. We are scheduled to start school on Monday so that I can have 6 weeks without any interruptions (ha!) to solidify our school routine. He seems to have a hard time with knowing what day of the week it is and what it means; Sunday= church, for example. I am thinking I'll add some picture cues to our calendar for him. Are there other "tricks" to the routines that might help?

    Thank you ladies! It is wonderful to have a place of support and encouragement!
    Heidi
    2017-18
    dd- MP2
    ds- redshirting K
    dd- 2 years old & scribbling on everyone's paper

  8. #8
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    Mar 2012
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    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    Quote Originally Posted by VAmom View Post

    As far as OT, is there anything in particular I should look for? We received recommendations for two places. Are there different approaches to OT?

    ... So maybe I should go ahead and have him do SC-C which would give him some new material and some extra practice. Should I try to do the enrichment along with the 2nd grade enrichment I am already doing?

    He seems to have a hard time with knowing what day of the week it is and what it means; Sunday= church, for example. I am thinking I'll add some picture cues to our calendar for him. Are there other "tricks" to the routines that might help?
    OT
    1) a provider who takes your insurance and 2) an OT who specializes in (or enjoys working with) children with sensory issues.

    SC-C
    This sounds like a good plan. If you can do the SC-C enrichment, that would be very helpful. Everything works together. You can, however, omit the Nature Reader if you do not have time.

    Calendar
    For now, focus on one week, rather than one month. Your photo calendar might have 7 large photos, Sunday - Saturday left to right.

    Each day in your Opening, try this:
    1. Say the names of the days of the week together as you point to each photo in order, left to right. ("Sunday, Monday, ....")
    2. Point to "today." Say, "Today is Thursday."
    3. Point to the day before. Say, "Yesterday was Wednesday."
    4. Point to today again. "Today is Thursday."
    5. Point to the day after. Say, "Tomorrow will be Friday."
    6. Point to today again. "What is today?" (Today is Thursday.)
    7. Do this daily. Be sure to end on "today" with the child saying the day.

    In this way you are working subtly on "to be" verb tenses which will be helpful in SC 3 (or MP 2), you are teaching "yesterday, today, tomorrow," and you are making those days of the week very solid in his mind.

  9. #9
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    Jul 2015
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    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    Quote Originally Posted by cherylswope View Post
    OT
    1) a provider who takes your insurance and 2) an OT who specializes in (or enjoys working with) children with sensory issues.

    SC-C
    This sounds like a good plan. If you can do the SC-C enrichment, that would be very helpful. Everything works together. You can, however, omit the Nature Reader if you do not have time.

    Calendar
    For now, focus on one week, rather than one month. Your photo calendar might have 7 large photos, Sunday - Saturday left to right.

    Each day in your Opening, try this:
    1. Say the names of the days of the week together as you point to each photo in order, left to right. ("Sunday, Monday, ....")
    2. Point to "today." Say, "Today is Thursday."
    3. Point to the day before. Say, "Yesterday was Wednesday."
    4. Point to today again. "Today is Thursday."
    5. Point to the day after. Say, "Tomorrow will be Friday."
    6. Point to today again. "What is today?" (Today is Thursday.)
    7. Do this daily. Be sure to end on "today" with the child saying the day.

    In this way you are working subtly on "to be" verb tenses which will be helpful in SC 3 (or MP 2), you are teaching "yesterday, today, tomorrow," and you are making those days of the week very solid in his mind.
    We did SC-C last year. It took my son at least a full semester to "kind" of get it and now it makes so much difference in our day to day life. "Oh, today is x, we do x."
    Christine
    (2016-2017)
    DD (8/09) SC2
    DS (9/11) SC-C
    DD (2/13) - soaking it all up!

    (2017-2018)
    DD (8/09) SC3
    DS (9/11) SC1
    DD (2/13) -still soaking it up, using Jr. K workbooks and R&S workbooks

  10. #10
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    Aug 2015
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    Noth Park Colorado
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    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    I'm cleaning my attic. Re-discovering old treasures and purging like crazy, along Anita's lines of simplifying life to de-stress.

    Anyways, I found a big bag of laminated schedule cue cards that we used for my son years ago. They have velcro dots on the back. It's seriously a gallon bag full. Geared mostly to the preschool jrK crowd. Has a church for Sunday, lunch time, nap time, go to the park, play with blocks, brush teeth...all sorts of things. Enough to schedule a full week at a time.

    If you're interested, just PM me and I'll ship em out. Free! Just want them to get used, feel dreadful just chucking them in the trash.
    Married to DH for 11 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

    DS9- Simply Classical 3 / Grade 2 Classic Core, DD6- Grade 1 Classic Core, DD 4- Simply Classical C

  11. #11
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    Aug 2016
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    109

    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    Quote Originally Posted by cherylswope View Post
    OT

    Calendar
    For now, focus on one week, rather than one month. Your photo calendar might have 7 large photos, Sunday - Saturday left to right.

    Each day in your Opening, try this:
    1. Say the names of the days of the week together as you point to each photo in order, left to right. ("Sunday, Monday, ....")
    2. Point to "today." Say, "Today is Thursday."
    3. Point to the day before. Say, "Yesterday was Wednesday."
    4. Point to today again. "Today is Thursday."
    5. Point to the day after. Say, "Tomorrow will be Friday."
    6. Point to today again. "What is today?" (Today is Thursday.)
    7. Do this daily. Be sure to end on "today" with the child saying the day.

    In this way you are working subtly on "to be" verb tenses which will be helpful in SC 3 (or MP 2), you are teaching "yesterday, today, tomorrow," and you are making those days of the week very solid in his mind.
    Cheryl,

    Thank you this makes sense. We will start working on this on Monday. Do you put pictures with the words too?

    Heidi
    2017-18
    dd- MP2
    ds- redshirting K
    dd- 2 years old & scribbling on everyone's paper

  12. #12
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    Aug 2016
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    109

    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    Quote Originally Posted by howiecram View Post
    We did SC-C last year. It took my son at least a full semester to "kind" of get it and now it makes so much difference in our day to day life. "Oh, today is x, we do x."
    Howiecram,

    Thank you for the heads up on how long it takes. It helps to know that you aren't the only mom repeating the same.exact.thing.for.the.hundredth.time. I thought of you this morning as my child was screaming about how awful it is to get dressed before breakfast, even though we spent the entire summer working on our morning routine.

    Heidi
    2017-18
    dd- MP2
    ds- redshirting K
    dd- 2 years old & scribbling on everyone's paper

  13. #13
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    Aug 2016
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    109

    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    Quote Originally Posted by Colomama View Post
    I'm cleaning my attic. Re-discovering old treasures and purging like crazy, along Anita's lines of simplifying life to de-stress.

    Anyways, I found a big bag of laminated schedule cue cards that we used for my son years ago. They have velcro dots on the back. It's seriously a gallon bag full. Geared mostly to the preschool jrK crowd. Has a church for Sunday, lunch time, nap time, go to the park, play with blocks, brush teeth...all sorts of things. Enough to schedule a full week at a time.

    If you're interested, just PM me and I'll ship em out. Free! Just want them to get used, feel dreadful just chucking them in the trash.
    Colomama,

    Oh my! Thank you so much! I can't say enough kind words about how wonderful the MP community is! I'll send the PM now. It's my first one so it might not work.

    Heidi
    2017-18
    dd- MP2
    ds- redshirting K
    dd- 2 years old & scribbling on everyone's paper

  14. #14
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    Mar 2012
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    1,593

    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    Quote Originally Posted by VAmom View Post
    Cheryl,

    Thank you this makes sense. We will start working on this on Monday. Do you put pictures with the words too?

    Heidi
    I found that photos helped. You can do this for any day that has a set routine.

    A tip: use a photo of your own bank, grocery store, pool, therapy center, etc. If you attend church every Sunday, take a photo of your actual church.

  15. #15
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    Mar 2014
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    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    Quote Originally Posted by VAmom View Post
    Howiecram,

    Thank you for the heads up on how long it takes. It helps to know that you aren't the only mom repeating the same.exact.thing.for.the.hundredth.time. I thought of you this morning as my child was screaming about how awful it is to get dressed before breakfast, even though we spent the entire summer working on our morning routine.

    Heidi
    I found that really helpful too.

    Also, we've had many mornings these past few weeks where there was crying about having to get dressed before breakfast. One of the first few days we did our routine, we had a battle of wills -- he stayed in his room for 1.5 hours before he put on clothes. No clothes = no food. Solidarity.

    I have a visual schedule for our morning routine - it's just a word table with a picture with words next to it, like make your bed, get dressed, etc. It helps my 4 year old. My 9 year old thinks its the "worst thing ever." However, he now knows what is expected whether he likes it or not.
    Susan

    2017-2018
    A (9) - mix of SC 2 and MP 1, R&S math 3
    C (8) - mix of SC 2 and MP 1, R&S math 2
    G (4) - Simply Classical A, hoping to start SC B in the spring

  16. #16
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    Jul 2015
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    Lafayette, IN
    Posts
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    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    A few thoughts/discussion on Sensory/Executive Function issues

    1) In reflection, I'm wondering if I had not supported my son more, if there would have been less resistance? When you think about the whole process of getting dressed, it is actually an extremely multi-task item. To get dressed, here are the steps I can think of involved: 1) leave the spot you are in and get to your bedroom. 2) take off the clothes you are wearing 3) put the clothes where they belong 4) get a shirt 5) get some bottoms 6) put on shirt 7) put on pants.

    That is actually a complex task! Even though the child might be physically able to complete the task, they are basically, emotionally not able. They literally can not do it. I definitely find myself struggling with this. How much do I support the child vs "giving in". When is it a battle of the wills and when do they just really need more support?

    So, in the case of the "morning routine" to ask my son to get dressed, make his bed, and brush his teeth may have been ridiculous to begin with. We probably would have completed the routine at the same time, but with less frustration on all our parts if I would have considered offering more support. I could have gone with him to his room and either 1) direct him what to do and in what order 2) physically help with small parts and gradually move to him doing it more himself. The making bed might have to wait. "Can you help me make your bed?" "Ok, we are done, let's go brush your teeth now." After several weeks of supporting him getting dressed, you try sending them to do it on their own...then add make bed, etc.

    I think when we are schooling these are also things we need to consider. Last year, my son could not color a page by himself. He didn't need me to physically do anything, but he needed me physically sitting there to say, "Wow, you colored the bear's nose brown", let's color this flower next". We did actually do this, and eventually, I was able to leave for short periods gradually working up to longer periods and finally, "assigning" it. Is it a battle of the wills, or did he just need support? Again, serious questions here. It's the whole when to push and when to support challenge.

    Lastly, I have heard to consider for many tasks what a child 2 years younger might be expected/able to do. This seems to be about right on when I think of even the two above tasks. The child was physically able to 1) get dressed, make a bed and brush teeth, but was not emotionally (is that the right word?) ready. The child could physically color, but looking at a big open page was overwhelming. I coached him through to get it done.
    Christine
    (2016-2017)
    DD (8/09) SC2
    DS (9/11) SC-C
    DD (2/13) - soaking it all up!

    (2017-2018)
    DD (8/09) SC3
    DS (9/11) SC1
    DD (2/13) -still soaking it up, using Jr. K workbooks and R&S workbooks

  17. #17
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    Aug 2015
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    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    Totally agreeing with Christine here. I definitely have caught myself over-assigning things. Like brush your teeth. He'd get all flummoxed at choosing his toothbrush, there were so many to choose from at the sink. My girls have started brushing their faces...seriously. luckily, no toothpaste was involved. Ha!

    Definitely work on one thing at a time. A whole morning routine would be overwhelming to my 9 year. He's got the get dressed part, but make bed is what we're working on. He changed his own sheets today and just could not figure out how to get that blasted fitted sheet on the mattress. He would get a corner tucked and it would come off when he moved to the next corner. We finally got it wrestled into place, luckily no tears were shed.
    Married to DH for 11 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

    DS9- Simply Classical 3 / Grade 2 Classic Core, DD6- Grade 1 Classic Core, DD 4- Simply Classical C

  18. #18
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    Durham, NC
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    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    I think you have a great point Christine. It is a very fine line. When is a tantrum a character thing and when is it a sign of overload or being asked to do something they're not developmentally ready for. I think the 2 years younger is a good guideline. It's helpful to keep in mind.

    When my kids are doing their morning/bedtime routine, I'm either right along side with them, or I'm available to help.

    In the case of our morning routine, for a long time we've been telling A to go get dressed and brush his teeth and he does it just fine. So in my example of the 1.5 hour stand off - it really was just that. I was having him do something out of his preferred order and that was hard for him. In that situation I chose to hold firm because I knew I was asking him to do something he was capable of. With G, I'm doing the morning routine right next to him. Okay G, lets look at your chart, what's first and so on. With the older two, I need to just ask them, have you done XYZ? A still needs help making his bed, likely will for quite a while. C is the only one who can do the whole thing independently.

    Now for school tasks -- In my planning, I thought I'd be able to assign his math work, phonics pages, and some other things independently. Turns out I can't. For now, he needs me right there next to him giving direction. I think as the school year progresses we will be able to move towards doing more independently, but not right now. It really is a tricky thing to discern.
    Susan

    2017-2018
    A (9) - mix of SC 2 and MP 1, R&S math 3
    C (8) - mix of SC 2 and MP 1, R&S math 2
    G (4) - Simply Classical A, hoping to start SC B in the spring

  19. #19
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    Jul 2015
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    Lafayette, IN
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    950

    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    Quote Originally Posted by sfhargett View Post
    I think you have a great point Christine. It is a very fine line. When is a tantrum a character thing and when is it a sign of overload or being asked to do something they're not developmentally ready for. I think the 2 years younger is a good guideline. It's helpful to keep in mind.

    When my kids are doing their morning/bedtime routine, I'm either right along side with them, or I'm available to help.

    In the case of our morning routine, for a long time we've been telling A to go get dressed and brush his teeth and he does it just fine. So in my example of the 1.5 hour stand off - it really was just that. I was having him do something out of his preferred order and that was hard for him. In that situation I chose to hold firm because I knew I was asking him to do something he was capable of. With G, I'm doing the morning routine right next to him. Okay G, lets look at your chart, what's first and so on. With the older two, I need to just ask them, have you done XYZ? A still needs help making his bed, likely will for quite a while. C is the only one who can do the whole thing independently.

    Now for school tasks -- In my planning, I thought I'd be able to assign his math work, phonics pages, and some other things independently. Turns out I can't. For now, he needs me right there next to him giving direction. I think as the school year progresses we will be able to move towards doing more independently, but not right now. It really is a tricky thing to discern.
    My son has figured out a way to circumvent part of the morning routine! He's been sleeping ONTOP of his covers, so he doesn't have to make his bed! HAHAHA. It's going to be a cold winter! (HE said, no, I just use my blanket (half the size of himself) and put the big pillow on top if I am cold). He has actually chosen himself now to get up and first thing get dressed. He said "then all I have left is to brush my teeth after breakfast". HE broke it all up for himself!
    Christine
    (2016-2017)
    DD (8/09) SC2
    DS (9/11) SC-C
    DD (2/13) - soaking it all up!

    (2017-2018)
    DD (8/09) SC3
    DS (9/11) SC1
    DD (2/13) -still soaking it up, using Jr. K workbooks and R&S workbooks

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Franklin, Ohio
    Posts
    59

    Default Re: Sensory Processing Help

    Wow! Reading through this thread has been so helpful! Though my daughter has not been diagnosed, I know she has sensory issues. She also really likes routines, but has a hard time staying focused. During school last year she needed me nearby cheering her on or she would lose focus and not get anything done. Now I have some ideas on how to help her.
    --Amanda

    DD #1 - First Grade Core
    DD #2 - Preschool

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