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    Start with Latin?

    Finally giving up my lurker status:
    My family is starting MP this fall and are absolutely thrilled! I've been searching for a co-op or group to build community with since we moved to this area about a year and half ago, but we've unfortunately not found good connections.. I reached out to another newcomer and we've discussed setting up our own co-op or social group for the project style learning (PE, art, science, other possibilities). I even have a church interested in hosting us which my friend has said is one of the hardest parts of building a program or group. So that's awesome.

    But then I got to thinking more about the next year and want I really want help with. My oldest will be doing the 2nd grade core which means he'll start Latin. I really want to do Latin with someone else/another family/co-op/etc. but my search has turned up nothing in this area for homeschooling offerings for Latin. (Perhaps they're somewhere beyond by tech abilities?) I've never taught Latin! Don't have a clue to how to speak it! But I have the DVDs. . .

    So - I've been stalking this subthread of starting something. But what? My friend who is interested in doing a co-op has no interest in Latin at all (although not opposed to it). Would someone be interested in doing Latin with someone who has no idea what they're doing (like me)?

    I've reached out to others on the community webpage, but I've only gotten two responses. I am meeting with both of them next week. So that could turn up something. Others I've reached out to who have older children aren't interested in changing curriculum. But I'm not on social media so I haven't reached out to a large portion of people. I'm member of a resource group in the area but have yet to post anything to gauge interest until I have a better idea of what I'd like to do (or offer if we go charging ahead with the idea of a co-op/school).

    Background of me: Mom of three (7 year old son, almost 4 year old son, 8 month old daughter). I've been homeschooling our oldest from the start using classical methods but didn't realize it was a method. I have checked out Classical Conversations but it was never a good fit for us (something just felt "off" for us). I've just been introduced to MP and decided to go to a convention they'd be attending. Loved all the helpful staff and lectures I heard!!! Really solidified my decision to choose MP.

    Anyhow, those of you with much greater experience - how or what would you do?

    #2
    Welcome, Amanda!!
    First off, good for you for being willing to dive into something new. My best advice would be to dig into MP this year and learn the ropes without starting Latin. I would wait one year and start Prima in third. This is not MP talking, this is just Jessica. I am seeing that kids who start Prima in second (who do not attend full time school) usually hit some gaps in analytical thinking that can make some of the Forms difficult in years ahead. Of course, you could start Prima and then take two years to do Latina Christiana, but that makes it much harder to do in a group. I like the one-year/one-class layout that you can do if you simply start a year later. It would give you the year to learn the MP ropes as I said above and it would give you time to gather people more closely around you whom you would have a full year to invite to your cause. You could offer Prima fall of 2020 for second/third/fourth graders and perhaps grab a wider group of people. For this fall, I'd really recommend the Literature and Enrichment that's right in your oldest's lesson plan. That would make an excellent enrichment offering that's completely organized for you. Tack on some free play or old fashioned games and you have have PE. It would also potentially make others curious about MP.

    Just some preliminary thoughts. How does this hit you?
    Festina lentē,
    Jessica P

    SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
    @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
    S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
    D · 8th
    D · 5th
    S · 2nd

    Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

    Comment


      #3
      Thank you for your response!
      I can't say I wouldn't be disappointed to not start as planned. Could you explain more on the levels of Latin MP offers or what is expected to complete the various levels? Would I just skip that in the planning manual but then double up in the next year? I assume Latin is taught each year after second grade.
      If I'm not reaching out to others with the potential Latin study, I don't know what would make our little co-op (potentially) more appealing than any other. Well, the literature study would, I think. And I definitely love the enrichment that already laid out for me.

      Comment


        #4
        First, if you don’t want to do Latin alone, you can just see if anyone in your area might want a once weekly Latin class using Prima. The only issue with waiting is that if you plan to use MP core, you throw off the entire lesson plan book. This won’t be an issue for some, for others it will be.

        Talk to Others before deciding for sure.

        If if you are looking to get a small co-op going, you can just offer the grade for your own kiddos and do it at home. I love a good in-home co-op.
        Traditional Catholic mom of 4
        DD 16 - Kolbe 10th grade, volleyball player, applying to Catholic universities
        DD 14 - MP 8A, ASL, speech club, skater, crochet lover
        DD 6 - MP 1ST, volleyball and church lover
        DS 5 - mommy's crazy maker

        Comment


          #5
          Amanda,

          I wanted to say welcome, and also to let you know that our Latin programs are written so that anyone can teach them. So you can learn Latin as you teach it. Or take yourself through it this summer to get ahead of your students. And if you could swing it, we would love to have you come to our Sodalitas Gathering in Louisville this July. You could do a pre-conference Latin workshop on Wed. and get a crash course that way. Here is the link for SG: https://www.memoriapress.com/curricu...-registration/

          As to your question about our Latin programs, I will give you a short synopsis here:

          Prima Latina: Very introductory course for young students (2nd or 3rd grade). Introduces 5 vocabulary words a week and teaches the 8 parts of speech (in English) and some Latin prayers and songs. Grammar forms are barely introduced in this program.

          Latina Christiana: Another introductory course for 3rd-5th graders. Introduces 10 vocabulary words a week and a grammar form, so this course is ramped up from Prima, but still introductory.

          First Form Latin: This is our introductory course for 6th grade and up or the first actual grammar course for students who have completed Prima Latina and/or Latina Christiana. This is where we are getting serious about Latin. FFL introduces 10 vocabulary words a week and a grammar form, but there is also extensive practice with a rather large workbook, so we are looking for retention and mastery here as well as application to some extent.

          All of our Latin courses come with teaching dvds and a scripted teacher manual so that you can teach Latin yourself. But the first year you are teaching it, if you just listen with your students to the dvd and do the written work, you will learn the Latin alongside them. We only do one lesson a week, so there is plenty of time to nail a lesson before moving on.

          I hope this helps a little, but feel free to reach out with additional questions. We are here to help!

          Tanya

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Amanda U View Post
            Thank you for your response!
            I can't say I wouldn't be disappointed to not start as planned. Could you explain more on the levels of Latin MP offers or what is expected to complete the various levels? Would I just skip that in the planning manual but then double up in the next year? I assume Latin is taught each year after second grade.
            If I'm not reaching out to others with the potential Latin study, I don't know what would make our little co-op (potentially) more appealing than any other. Well, the literature study would, I think. And I definitely love the enrichment that already laid out for me.
            It IS fun to start, but I'm just saying that if you are thinking to offer it as a class then you need to think ahead about what that will look like a few years out. If you start Prima this year then you'll probably want to do LC over two years. The first year is easy logistically and you can do the second half the following year, however, if anyone wants to join you in three years they'll need to work through the first half of the book to join you. I know that seems a long way away! Anyway, it's just something to think about. To solve this you can:
            1) start Prima and possibly do it two years in a row (the kids don't remember it as well as your think!), Then move on to LC at a one year pace
            2) wait a year to start Prima then do everything on a one year pace (easier to add new folks in)
            3) do Prima, then spread LC over two years, having any new people work solo to be ready to join you

            There's not a "right" way to do this but when you start doing a study with a group your choices will have consequences down the line. In a homeschool you just do whatever you want, but in a group you have to move together. At our 1x/week cottage school we aren't seeing the analytical mastery we want in fourth grade First Form students so we are bumping everyone up a year. It's taken three years to see this though! Try something, but then be willing to flex if you need to. The Forms are no joke and slightly older students can feel more up to that challenge. When parents aren't working through with students they need more teacher help. My goal for my own kids is to get to Latin translation and reading in high school. Starting Prima in 3rd gets you four full years! I've found I need outside help by Third Form. For me, this meant I could do it at home with DVDs for four years!

            Good luck!
            Festina lentē,
            Jessica P

            SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
            @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
            S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
            D · 8th
            D · 5th
            S · 2nd

            Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

            Comment


              #7
              Thank you for the responses! I had originally planned to purchase the core packages each year. How is Latin covered each year going through the packages?
              From what I understand, 2nd - Prima Latina
              3rd -Latina Christiana - is this also 4th? (LC is covered over two years?)
              progressive Form levels 5th and up?

              And, yes, I do intend to take Latin alongside my oldest. My classical education is lacking to put it mildly.

              We are thinking about the logistics of the Sodilatas gathering this summer. We're about 8ish hours away. Our family could really use the support. As I mentioned earlier, I haven't found others who classically educate (outside of the Classical Conversations group). I was hoping to put it out there we'd be studying Latin and see if that strikes anyone's interest to join us.

              Thank you for any and all suggestions!

              Comment


                #8
                Amanda,

                Here is our Latin sequence in the Cores:
                2nd - Prima Latina
                3rd - Latina Christiana (Part 1)
                4th - Latina Christiana (Part 2)
                5th - First Form Latin
                6th - Second Form Latin
                7th - Third Form Latin
                8th - Fourth Form Latin alongside Henle I
                9th - Henle 2 Exercises (Caesar)
                10th - Caesar Translation Course
                11th - Henle 3 (Cicero)
                12th - AP Latin (Vergil & Caesar)

                Comment


                  #9
                  Glad to have found this thread. I have been thinking about starting some sort of class as well. I will also have a 2nd grader and I did consider starting a Prima Class and may still be considering it. It is easy to teach, fun to teach, and Ihave taught my older two kids Prima. I will agree with above poster though about the Forms. Now that I remembering after reading through this thread, my Ds1 did do First through 4th forms with the help of MPOA. He started First Form in 6th grade. It was easy for us, so was 2nd Form. He did do the online academy, but i was drilling all the other days of the week and do know the material. However, 3rd Form was harder, but we managed. But... it's 4th Form that is really a lot of work and it's hard and translation exercises really take more time and brain power. It was a lot and he was 14 by this time. I do think it would be helpful to go slower than the onlne academy, but then again their schedule pulls you through to get it done. DS1 completed his latin studies after 4th Form.
                  So now I'm going to have to decide about Prima class for 2nd or for 3rd! LOL

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