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    Mod or Acc curriculum

    Do any of the cottage schools utilize the moderated curriculum instead of the accelerated?

    Also, when starting a new school, how do you "get all of the students on the same page" when some have MP in their background and some do not? A parent today asked me how hard it would be to play catch up on the cumulative subjects, like grammar. (I think she said she would have a 6th grader coming into the program.)

    God bless,
    Meredith
    Son- 4th grade, homeschooled, full core
    2 younger children in Catholic school
    1 more munchkin up to no good

    #2
    Are you teaching all subjects to students sorted by grades, or will you offer classes at the same time and do a la carte placement? We do the latter. Either way has its own pros & cons.
    Festina lentē,
    Jessica P

    SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
    @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
    S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
    D · 8th
    D · 5th
    S · 2nd

    Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by pickandgrin View Post
      Are you teaching all subjects to students sorted by grades, or will you offer classes at the same time and do a la carte placement? We do the latter. Either way has its own pros & cons.
      We already know that Latin will be taught by one of the priests, so that class can't be offered all at the same time. I hadn't consider a la carte placement, though. I'd be curious to hear more about the pros and cons.
      Son- 4th grade, homeschooled, full core
      2 younger children in Catholic school
      1 more munchkin up to no good

      Comment


        #4
        Well, it sounds like it's something you won't be able to do! None the less, it simply means that all sections of a certain course are offered at one time and the student goes into the appropriate class at that time, even if it's with older or younger students. We do this on Mondays when we teach Latin, Lit, Comp, and Classical Studies. A student may move from Second Form Latin to Greek Tragedies instead of being in a "tenth grade classroom." The cons are that you need many teachers per section and those are hard to find. The advantage for us is that we serve homeschoolers and most students are new to Memoria Press and classical education. They don't fit into a grade and we can't "boot camp" them over the summer to get them ready. We place then where they need to go as closely as we can. If you have more if a school feel you will probably not be able to do this method, but since we serve homeschoolers it's a win for our families. At some point we hope to have some teachers teaching multiple sections of one subject morning and afternoon, but we'll need most of our students to be more fully on track with the sequence. That takes time to accomplish.
        Festina lentē,
        Jessica P

        SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
        @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
        S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
        D · 8th
        D · 5th
        S · 2nd

        Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

        Comment


          #5
          To answer your first question, yes, some use moderated and some use accelerated. We follow the accelerated pacing with the exception of Latin which we are moving up to start in third rather than second. This will put students in First Form in fifth rather than fourth. I teach this class myself and found that fourth graders could learn the material but not overlearn & master the way slightly older students could. We think this will be a great move long term since our students only have Latin class once per week. I'll let you know how this turns out in about five years.
          Festina lentē,
          Jessica P

          SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
          @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
          S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
          D · 8th
          D · 5th
          S · 2nd

          Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

          Comment


            #6
            My thinking is that if we use the moderated curriculum that there would be less "catching up" to have to do. My son would be entering 5th grade on a moderated curriculum and almost all of our 3rd grade and up prospective students would be new to MP.

            For our circumstances, I'd like to have our meeting days on Tuesdays and Thursdays, with Tuesday functioning as "Day 1" of the school week. (The reason for this is that we have a huge co-op in our area that meets on Mondays that some families may want to continue attending.) From what I've read, the easiest schedule to follow with K-2 is to go straight down the curriculum manual for that day, so that means Tuesdays would cover Day 1 and Thursdays would cover Day 3. Am I correct that most schools have found the practice of following a single's day work in the CM to be best practice for K-2?

            For 3rd grade and up, I'm thinking of employing an A/B schedule. The reason for this is that the priests would only be available on Tuesdays. So Tuesdays could cover Latin, Catechism, Christian studies, and maybe classical studies, while Thursdays would cover something like literature, composition, geography, spelling and/or grammar recitation.
            Son- 4th grade, homeschooled, full core
            2 younger children in Catholic school
            1 more munchkin up to no good

            Comment


              #7
              Your plan sounds solid! I credit one of our teachers in our first year coming up with the "let's just do Monday in the guide" approach. I think most cottage schools do this now, simply teaching Monday on whatever day they meet. I didn't see you mention math--will you be teaching that?

              One caution-if families continue with the old co-op and join you that means they have to get all their work done in two days at home. That's hard for studies like Latin & math that should be done daily. Just keep in mind that on the day when students are at your school doing the B day, they are not doing any homework from their A day. And vice-versa on the opposite day. This can get tricky for those daily subjects. I'm not saying that some families could not pull that off, especially with little kids, but I would caution families with older children that they will have to work hard on their days at home if they are going to spend their Monday somewhere else. You might also need to look into what kind of workload that co-op is going to expect. You don't want to have duplicated subjects between Monday and what you are doing Tuesday through Friday.

              Moderated pacing sounds ideal for you. Where you start with each subject and what, if anything, you require as summer reading will simply be determined by the ages you get enrolled.

              HTH!
              Festina lentē,
              Jessica P

              SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
              @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
              S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
              D · 8th
              D · 5th
              S · 2nd

              Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by pickandgrin View Post
                I didn't see you mention math--will you be teaching that?

                One caution-if families continue with the old co-op and join you that means they have to get all their work done in two days at home. That's hard for studies like Latin & math that should be done daily. Just keep in mind that on the day when students are at your school doing the B day, they are not doing any homework from their A day. And vice-versa on the opposite day. This can get tricky for those daily subjects.

                HTH!
                After asking around I think math would be best left up to the individual, but what you said gives me an idea! I was struggling with what to put in the block of B-day where I put spelling and grammar recitation, so maybe there could be designated time for "independent study." They could work on completing their math and Latin independently during that designated time, but there would be a tutor in the room to keep them on track and answer questions. They could even quiz each other with Latin flashcards and math facts. I'd put in in the third block of the day with geography in the fourth block. That way if they get their independent work done early the teacher could just start geography a little earlier. Geography is a lighter subject for the end of the day and easy to expand to fill time with tracing and coloring maps.

                Originally posted by pickandgrin View Post
                Where you start with each subject and what, if anything, you require as summer reading will simply be determined by the ages you get enrolled.
                I've seen that summer reading list somewhere and can't seem to find it again. Do you have a link?

                Thank you sooooo much for your help!
                Son- 4th grade, homeschooled, full core
                2 younger children in Catholic school
                1 more munchkin up to no good

                Comment


                  #9
                  Here's the Highlands Latin School required summer reading: https://thelatinschool.org/summer-re...uired-reading/
                  And here is the reading list for supplemental reading: https://thelatinschool.org/summerreadinglist/

                  Tanya

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by tanya View Post
                    Here's the Highlands Latin School required summer reading: https://thelatinschool.org/summer-re...uired-reading/
                    And here is the reading list for supplemental reading: https://thelatinschool.org/summerreadinglist/

                    Tanya
                    I had seen a list of summer reading to help kids catch up who were new to MP. Does that sound familiar?
                    Son- 4th grade, homeschooled, full core
                    2 younger children in Catholic school
                    1 more munchkin up to no good

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Each subject will basically have its own on-ramp and it will vary by what the student has done before. You should probably call it pre-requisite reading and not summer reading just to give it a different feel and convey that it is not optional . It will likely be course and student specific, though you can have a checklist for each course from which to start.
                      Festina lentē,
                      Jessica P

                      SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
                      @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
                      S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
                      D · 8th
                      D · 5th
                      S · 2nd

                      Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

                      Comment


                        #12
                        And I love your independent study idea!
                        Festina lentē,
                        Jessica P

                        SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
                        @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
                        S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
                        D · 8th
                        D · 5th
                        S · 2nd

                        Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by musdir26 View Post

                          I had seen a list of summer reading to help kids catch up who were new to MP. Does that sound familiar?
                          Are you thinking of this handout from Sodalitas 2018? Starting MP in Middle and High School (2018 Sodalitas handout).pdf

                          I'm not sure who wrote it, but I think it will answer your question.

                          HTH!
                          Michael
                          Memoria Press

                          Comment

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