Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

Kate, attention, stubbornness, again

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Kate, attention, stubbornness, again

    So, I know it's our first day back, but I'm not expecting things to get better any time soon, so I thought I'd ask. Has anyone delayed academics beyond what you think "ought" to be needed due to your child not seeming ready emotionally? Kate is ready honestly for the content of SC C (and probably SC 1). Her fine motor skills are no where ready for SC 1, so thanks to Cheryl's patience with me, we are doing SC C with her, focusing on writing/fine motor, listening (read aloud - both SC and MP K Enrichment), and sight word reading.

    But ... she is so insanely stubborn. She makes her older brothers pale in comparison. I know it's inherent with Down syndrome. Maybe it's on the 21st chromosome. But it's near impossible to get her cooperation with anything other than usually read aloud time. Reading? Nope (some stems from my problems that I posted about last month of her not literally looking at the word/letter/page). Writing? Um, forget about it.

    Developmentally, she's around 5, though chronologically she's 7. Her receptive language is high, though she is very, very minimally verbal (really still non-verbal, though she has enough vocabulary for us to understand most of what she's saying). She demonstrates a lot of her knowledge through her play, mimicking stories she's heard or shows she's watched. She can follow along pretty well with Mass. Her and her younger brother (27 months old) have developed quite a play relationship, and talk to each other and somehow understand each other (he is speech delayed, though not developmentally delayed - he had a tongue tie).

    Could it be that despite her age, she's just not developmentally ready to sit down and do the hard work of learning to write? And then, when do you move ahead with content (by reading aloud) and yet know fine motor and also the ability to actually answer any comprehension questions will be lightyears behind? I'm really at a loss to know how much to push her (because it's just stubbornness) versus when to back off (because her opposition is due to not being developmentally ready for what I'm asking her to do).

    My biggest concern is holding her back from content she's ready to hear because she's not ready to learn to write or because she's not able to demonstrate learning the traditional ways. Help, please.
    Last edited by MyLittleWonders; 01-08-2018, 05:31 PM.
    Brit

    Catholic mom to five
    2019-2020:
    Ds '01 - College freshman: Thomas Aquinas College
    Ds '03 - 10th grade: MPOA Algebra 2, and a bunch of other stuff
    Ds '06 - 8th: MP Tiner science (chemistry, physics, and astronomy), 8M lit, 8M Exploring Planet Earth, ancient history, OLVS 8 Catechism
    Dd '10 (Down syndrome) - JrK with little brother and BOB books
    Ds '15 - JrK with big sister

    #2
    Re: Kate, attention, stubbornness, again

    First, you do not need to let her fine-motor weaknesses interfere with her learning. If she is ready to learn to read, you can teach her to read in SC 1 (or last semester SC C) without the writing. If she still needs the phonological awareness and pre-reading of SC C first semester, you can continue this with minimal writing. The lessons of SC C integrate in so many ways, the writing is often just "icing on the cake." You can decrease the amount of writing or coloring you require if she is otherwise ready to learn.

    Other thoughts:
    Maybe you can pull her most-cooperative parts of SC C and string them together in a row, so you begin to have some cohesive cooperation? I would aim for a day of success, even if the sessions are short. If you could create two good work sessions in a day, that might be all you can accomplish. After that, maybe you allow some of her learning to occur through her favorite ways: read-alouds, looking through (or listening to) books herself. Encourage fine-motor play through crafts, playdough, playdough scissors, bead stringing.

    Does she respond to charts or other incentives? For years my daughter worked for playtime. She loved pretend play. Her language therapist would tell her she could play at the end of her lessons. In Kate's therapies, has she cooperated well with anyone? Is there anything you could emulate from what worked in those settings?

    Just be sure she is not manipulating you. She is a "smart cookie," and she gives herself away in her playtimes.

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Kate, attention, stubbornness, again

      Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
      First, you do not need to let her fine-motor weaknesses interfere with her learning. If she is ready to learn to read, you can teach her to read in SC 1 (or last semester SC C) without the writing. If she still needs the phonological awareness and pre-reading of SC C first semester, you can continue this with minimal writing. The lessons of SC C integrate in so many ways, the writing is often just "icing on the cake." You can decrease the amount of writing or coloring you require if she is otherwise ready to learn.

      Other thoughts:
      Maybe you can pull her most-cooperative parts of SC C and string them together in a row, so you begin to have some cohesive cooperation? I would aim for a day of success, even if the sessions are short. If you could create two good work sessions in a day, that might be all you can accomplish. After that, maybe you allow some of her learning to occur through her favorite ways: read-alouds, looking through (or listening to) books herself. Encourage fine-motor play through crafts, playdough, playdough scissors, bead stringing.

      Does she respond to charts or other incentives? For years my daughter worked for playtime. She loved pretend play. Her language therapist would tell her she could play at the end of her lessons. In Kate's therapies, has she cooperated well with anyone? Is there anything you could emulate from what worked in those settings?

      Just be sure she is not manipulating you. She is a "smart cookie," and she gives herself away in her playtimes.
      I'm going to look at our day and see about changing things up. We tend to start with recitation (alphabet, numbers 1-15, Genesis 1:1) and sight words. We do this sometimes at the table and sometimes on the couch, often depending on what's going on with the other kids. Then she has a break before we'd attempt to sit at the table to practice writing our letters or our numbers.

      Maybe instead, we should just start on the couch with a book. One she loves already. And then add in the book we're reading that day/week. We were starting with "circle time" - ring around the Rosies, Sally go round the sun type songs. But Oliver was making it difficult as he had specific ideas of what songs to sing at which times. LOL Maybe she'd be more willing to work on her learning to write with Dad in the evening ...

      You are right on not letting her manipulate me. There seems to be a common thread with Down syndrome and trying to avoid anything that is "hard" or "work". Then add attention issues and it gets difficult to get her cooperation. But with her delays, sometimes I wonder if I'm pushing too hard. But, I also know she is capable of more than she wants to do. Her hand strength is weak, and my goal is daily play with play doh and kinetic sand. I'd love to have some type of monkey bars out back for her to hang from, too, though I'm not sure if that'll happen.

      I need to make a chart for her. She loves TV - Curious George and Doc McStuffins. I told her today that she'd have to do school with me to get TV. So ... no TV today. But maybe a chart will help know exactly how much Mom is making her do (I used to do something similar with my boys, just so they knew there was in fact an end to their day). It might help.

      Thank you Cheryl for your dedication to our children. There is comfort knowing I can come here with my concerns and confusions and know that between you and the other moms, there is understanding, ideas, and support.
      Brit

      Catholic mom to five
      2019-2020:
      Ds '01 - College freshman: Thomas Aquinas College
      Ds '03 - 10th grade: MPOA Algebra 2, and a bunch of other stuff
      Ds '06 - 8th: MP Tiner science (chemistry, physics, and astronomy), 8M lit, 8M Exploring Planet Earth, ancient history, OLVS 8 Catechism
      Dd '10 (Down syndrome) - JrK with little brother and BOB books
      Ds '15 - JrK with big sister

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Kate, attention, stubbornness, again

        Originally posted by MyLittleWonders View Post
        So, I know it's our first day back, but I'm not expecting things to get better any time soon, so I thought I'd ask. Has anyone delayed academics beyond what you think "ought" to be needed due to your child not seeming ready emotionally? Kate is ready honestly for the content of SC C (and probably SC 1). Her fine motor skills are no where ready for SC 1, so thanks to Cheryl's patience with me, we are doing SC C with her, focusing on writing/fine motor, listening (read aloud - both SC and MP K Enrichment), and sight word reading.

        But ... she is so insanely stubborn. She makes her older brothers pale in comparison. I know it's inherent with Down syndrome. Maybe it's on the 21st chromosome. But it's near impossible to get her cooperation with anything other than usually read aloud time. Reading? Nope (some stems from my problems that I posted about last month of her not literally looking at the word/letter/page). Writing? Um, forget about it.

        Developmentally, she's around 5, though chronologically she's 7. Her receptive language is high, though she is very, very minimally verbal (really still non-verbal, though she has enough vocabulary for us to understand most of what she's saying). She demonstrates a lot of her knowledge through her play, mimicking stories she's heard or shows she's watched. She can follow along pretty well with Mass. Her and her younger brother (27 months old) have developed quite a play relationship, and talk to each other and somehow understand each other (he is speech delayed, though not developmentally delayed - he had a tongue tie).

        Could it be that despite her age, she's just not developmentally ready to sit down and do the hard work of learning to write? And then, when do you move ahead with content (by reading aloud) and yet know fine motor and also the ability to actually answer any comprehension questions will be lightyears behind? I'm really at a loss to know how much to push her (because it's just stubbornness) versus when to back off (because her opposition is due to not being developmentally ready for what I'm asking her to do).

        My biggest concern is holding her back from content she's ready to hear because she's not ready to learn to write or because she's not able to demonstrate learning the traditional ways. Help, please.
        Oh, Brit — Big hugs! I’ll be back as soon as I can with a more detailed response. But NO — you are not alone! And no, this does not mean gloom nor doom. Keep reading at whatever level she enjoys. But teach at a level that she can attend. I know that seems odd. You WILL have to push her, likely far harder than you have had to push your other children. But she WILL get it. Start where she is and teach there. Wring all you can from that ability and push gently where she struggles. Things will start to fall in to place. Promise.
        Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
        Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
        Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
        Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

        “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
        ~Pope St John Paul II

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Kate, attention, stubbornness, again

          I made a star chart for the different levels for Sodalitas last year. I'll try to upload one here for you after supper or maybe tomorrow. It does wonders around here with the kids knowing when their day is over and how much more they have to do.
          Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

          DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
          DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
          DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

          We've completed:
          Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
          Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Kate, attention, stubbornness, again

            I thought I'd give a quick update ... it's only been three days, but they've been much better days. One thing I decided to do was to shelve the Alphabet and Numbers books for at least a few months. Instead, I'm using the raised line kindergarten paper Cheryl recommends in one of the levels. I used a highlighter to draw five circles (essentially capital Os) on each line. Then, I used a colored marker to make a dot at the top of each. We also counted them and I wrote the numbers inside each O. She traces 5 Os each day. Nothing more. Just five. I'm taking the approach that five circles/Os done every day with very little to no resistance is better than a full page of anything. We'll move onto vertical lines, horizontal lines, diagonal lines, capital Us, and upside down Us over time. My goal is to help her learn to control her fine movements to get closer and closer to the actual shape. Right now I'm holding loosely the tip of the marker (the fat Crayola washable markers) for stability. After we get good with the marker and the ease with which it glides on the paper, I'd like to use crayons (a bit more resistance), and then pencils/colored pencils for even more resistance/sensory input.

            Tuesday was a bit rough with her sight word primer (we are using the Faith & Freedom grade 1 pre-primer from Seton), so I started thinking about why she was resisting reading/having trouble with attending. I realized the font is pretty small and is embedded in the pictures (sweet 1950s era pictures similar to Dick & Jane). Visually it was very distracting to her and she was having a hard time focusing on the too-small-for-her words. So, I sat and typed out 10 stories in Word ... I put the paper landscape and the font at 60. I was able to type three sentences per sheet, doubled spaced. Then I printed them and sliced them. They are just loose leaf strips. I put the stack in front of her, while I sit facing her. I use the cap of the pink marker to point to each word (sentences range from 2-4 sentences so far), and as she finishes each sentence, I flip it over on the ground (we've been doing our reading on the living room floor), revealing the next sentence underneath. We've been able to successful get through three stories on Wednesday and the next three today much faster than it was taking her to read one in the book. My goal is to get her so familiar with the words/sentences that we can eventually pick the book back up and she'll be able to read from it. Eventually. And I think as much as I love the F&F readers, I'll probably move her into the Reading-Literature readers that Yesterday's Classics reprinted. The pages are all black and white with minimal illustrations, which should be less visually distracting for her.

            Thank you all for your encouragement. I really appreciate it.
            Brit

            Catholic mom to five
            2019-2020:
            Ds '01 - College freshman: Thomas Aquinas College
            Ds '03 - 10th grade: MPOA Algebra 2, and a bunch of other stuff
            Ds '06 - 8th: MP Tiner science (chemistry, physics, and astronomy), 8M lit, 8M Exploring Planet Earth, ancient history, OLVS 8 Catechism
            Dd '10 (Down syndrome) - JrK with little brother and BOB books
            Ds '15 - JrK with big sister

            Comment

            Working...
            X