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Anxiety strategies?!?

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  • VAmom
    replied
    Re: Anxiety strategies?!?

    Jennifer,

    Thank you so much! It is tremendously helpful to have somebody help talk through all of this. Tonight my husband and I sat down and read through the posts and discussed it.

    Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
    This sounds like distractibility more than anxiety?

    For example, my DS9 has moderate-severe ADHD and I repeat phrases like "sound out this letter...no, this one here", "yes, that does look like a dragon, but let's answer this math problem...this one right here", "you can draw stick figures after we finish this page" ad nauseam during our school time

    My DD7, on the other hand, has anxiety/perfectionism. For her, our days look like:
    "I can't do this!"
    "You can, just take your time."
    "But I don't know the answers!"
    "That's why we practice."
    " I can't do it!"
    "Let's take one problem at a time."
    We begin working together and, once she gets going, she'll be mad but will finish without much more prompting.

    My son needs me to be his focus coach through the entire assignment. Which one sounds more like your daughter?


    Both of these sound like E.


    These scream "executive function" to me. Combined with the distractibility, it could be that she's dealing with a form of ADD (there are a few different types). ADD is largely an executive function disorder, although executive function issues can exist without ADD. Sensory issues can also mimic or be combined with ADD and/or anxiety. Anxiety and ADD go hand-in-hand too (that would be one of my other children -- we've got all kinds of fun stuff going on here). This is where your pediatric psychologist comes in. They can help sort out exactly what she's dealing with, whether it's a single thing or a combination of challenges.

    Regardless of the "label" though, there are some things you can do. My DS14 and DD5 both react to change/the unexpected in the way you describe. They will either go into a full out tantrum (my oldest has mostly outgrown that), or completely shut down with their head in their arms. They will refuse to work and there is nothing under the sun that will make them change their mind. And discipline does nothing but make it TEN TIMES WORSE. This leaves me with a lot of questions about how do you draw the line between the anxiety/ADD symptoms and the disrespectful behavior.

    Here are a few tools I pull from to prevent/handle these situations:

    1. I know the common recommendation is to "prepare them beforehand", but there's more to it than that. The time and method of "early warning" has to be just right in order for it to be effective. I have to prepare my two at least 24 hours in advance or I will have serious reactions on my hands. I also have to present it "matter-of-factly"; one iota of "stepping on eggshells" in fear of their reaction and the game is up. Even with significant time and proper presentation, I will usually have some reactions but they are milder and I can give the child space/time to work through it (unless there's a tantrum involved...see below) before they have to be cooperative.

    Thank you for the reminder of stating it matter of factly. It’s difficult when you are mentally preparing for the wave of emotions.

    2. My 5yo has trouble getting started on her lessons, so it's often helpful to start or support with something I know she loves doing. This might be a movement activity from SC1, or sitting on my lap to do her work, or reminding her excitedly that she's able to work in Book D today (since she just finished Book C and Book D was her big goal).

    3. If they shut down, I've found the biggest help is to do nothing. The more you try to convince, cajole or threaten the worse it will get. Some examples:

    This morning, my son was upset about a schedule change so he completely shut down -- right when he was supposed to be studying for math. So I let him sit there while I presented his brother's math lesson. By the time I was ready to teach his lesson, he was good to go.

    If my 5yo shuts down during a lesson, I've found the best thing to do is to tell her "Let me know when you're ready." This doesn't mean that she gets to go play. She has to stay in her seat until she's ready to work again. If she won't stay in her seat, I then place her on my lap. This sometimes leads to an escalation where she starts throwing a fit, but I keep holding and rocking her and she eventually calms down and tells me (or indicates) that she's ready to return to her work.

    4. If they tantrum (hopefully this doesn't happen with your daughter, but if it does): we've had tantrums here that have ranged from stomping feet to throwing belongings to tipping furniture to putting dents in my walls and doors. We make clear that this behavior is unacceptable, but by this point they're completely out of control of their own reactions. For my younger one, we hold/rock. For the older one, I physically contain. For example, something had set him off so he shut down. He then decided that he would start pushing other people's buttons by pushing their book bins into the schoolwork they were trying to do. I moved his chair a few feet away from the school table (with him in it!) and then held the chair with one hand while reaching across the table with my other hand to continue my 7 year old's reading lesson. At one point, I told him half-jokingly that I would sit in his lap if that was what it took to keep him in his seat. This went on for 30 minutes. If I had done anything else though, it would have devolved into complete chaos/anger.

    We do have the tantrums and it is draining. With her it quickly escalates and thus far I am the only one who seems to be able to help her during them. My son has sensory processing disorder and is set off really easily. With the Christmas season, it seems to be at its height right now.

    That being said, IF THEY CROSS THE LINE, and attempt/actually do physically hurt someone or throw something, they are placed on immediate blackout. No toys, books, friends, etc. for a set amount of time, depending on the severity of the action. This works best for my son since he's older. For my daughter, my husband will usually intervene and take her upstairs to her room. He surfs the web on his phone while she calms down, removed from the situation. If my husband isn't home, I continue with the holding/rocking. This has led to some scratch marks and bruises on my arms and legs (she's an intense kid), but it keeps things from escalating further.

    5. If they don't come around: if they refuse to return to their work then they remain on blackout until it's completed (and completed well). This goes for my daughter as well.



    This is very common with both EF and ADD. Here are some things that have helped here:

    1. Make sure that no chore takes more than 10 minutes. This time may need to be greater or less for your daughter, but 10 minutes seems to be the timeframe that keeps my kids from feeling overwhelmed. However, this doesn't mean that they only do 10 minutes worth of chores a day! How do you handle school work then?

    2. Chore charts don't work long-term here, so when I'm on top of my game, I just look at what needs to be done and then make a list on the chalkboard. Each item on the list takes no more than 10 minutes. We then divide the list evenly between the kids. Usually they each have two things (older kids are assigned the extra if there's an uneven number). Because each task is no more than 10 minutes (often no more than 5), the kids don't feel overwhelmed. It's also modeling how to break a large task into smaller pieces.

    I have to get to work, but I hope something here helps! Please keep sharing/asking questions!
    I know I have more questions and thoughts but I’m having a hard time putting them on paper. Some of these struggles have been going on for so long that I’m not even sure what is normal. I know that 2nd to 3rd is a big transition and my hope and prayer is to have made some progress so that she can be successful how ever that looks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Anita
    replied
    Re: Anxiety strategies?!?

    Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
    This sounds like distractibility more than anxiety?

    For example, my DS9 has moderate-severe ADHD and I repeat phrases like "sound out this letter...no, this one here", "yes, that does look like a dragon, but let's answer this math problem...this one right here", "you can draw stick figures after we finish this page" ad nauseam during our school time

    My DD7, on the other hand, has anxiety/perfectionism. For her, our days look like:
    "I can't do this!"
    "You can, just take your time."
    "But I don't know the answers!"
    "That's why we practice."
    " I can't do it!"
    "Let's take one problem at a time."
    We begin working together and, once she gets going, she'll be mad but will finish without much more prompting.

    My son needs me to be his focus coach through the entire assignment. Which one sounds more like your daughter?





    These scream "executive function" to me. Combined with the distractibility, it could be that she's dealing with a form of ADD (there are a few different types). ADD is largely an executive function disorder, although executive function issues can exist without ADD. Sensory issues can also mimic or be combined with ADD and/or anxiety. Anxiety and ADD go hand-in-hand too (that would be one of my other children -- we've got all kinds of fun stuff going on here). This is where your pediatric psychologist comes in. They can help sort out exactly what she's dealing with, whether it's a single thing or a combination of challenges.

    Regardless of the "label" though, there are some things you can do. My DS14 and DD5 both react to change/the unexpected in the way you describe. They will either go into a full out tantrum (my oldest has mostly outgrown that), or completely shut down with their head in their arms. They will refuse to work and there is nothing under the sun that will make them change their mind. And discipline does nothing but make it TEN TIMES WORSE.

    Here are a few tools I pull from to prevent/handle these situations:

    1. I know the common recommendation is to "prepare them beforehand", but there's more to it than that. The time and method of "early warning" has to be just right in order for it to be effective. I have to prepare my two at least 24 hours in advance or I will have serious reactions on my hands. I also have to present it "matter-of-factly"; one iota of "stepping on eggshells" in fear of their reaction and the game is up. Even with significant time and proper presentation, I will usually have some reactions but they are milder and I can give the child space/time to work through it (unless there's a tantrum involved...see below) before they have to be cooperative.

    2. My 5yo has trouble getting started on her lessons, so it's often helpful to start or support with something I know she loves doing. This might be a movement activity from SC1, or sitting on my lap to do her work, or reminding her excitedly that she's able to work in Book D today (since she just finished Book C and Book D was her big goal).

    3. If they shut down, I've found the biggest help is to do nothing. The more you try to convince, cajole or threaten the worse it will get. Some examples:

    This morning, my son was upset about a schedule change so he completely shut down -- right when he was supposed to be studying for math. So I let him sit there while I presented his brother's math lesson. By the time I was ready to teach his lesson, he was good to go.

    If my 5yo shuts down during a lesson, I've found the best thing to do is to tell her "Let me know when you're ready." This doesn't mean that she gets to go play. She has to stay in her seat until she's ready to work again. If she won't stay in her seat, I then place her on my lap. This sometimes leads to an escalation where she starts throwing a fit, but I keep holding and rocking her and she eventually calms down and tells me (or indicates) that she's ready to return to her work.

    4. If they tantrum (hopefully this doesn't happen with your daughter, but if it does): we've had tantrums here that have ranged from stomping feet to throwing belongings to tipping furniture to putting dents in my walls and doors. We make clear that this behavior is unacceptable, but by this point they're completely out of control of their own reactions. For my younger one, we hold/rock. For the older one, I physically contain. For example, something had set him off so he shut down. He then decided that he would start pushing other people's buttons by pushing their book bins into the schoolwork they were trying to do. I moved his chair a few feet away from the school table (with him in it!) and then held the chair with one hand while reaching across the table with my other hand to continue my 7 year old's reading lesson. At one point, I told him half-jokingly that I would sit in his lap if that was what it took to keep him in his seat. This went on for 30 minutes. If I had done anything else though, it would have devolved into complete chaos/anger.

    That being said, IF THEY CROSS THE LINE, and attempt/actually do physically hurt someone or throw something, they are placed on immediate blackout. No toys, books, friends, etc. for a set amount of time, depending on the severity of the action. This works best for my son since he's older. For my daughter, my husband will usually intervene and take her upstairs to her room. He surfs the web on his phone while she calms down, removed from the situation. If my husband isn't home, I continue with the holding/rocking. This has led to some scratch marks and bruises on my arms and legs (she's an intense kid), but it keeps things from escalating further.

    5. If they don't come around: if they refuse to return to their work then they remain on blackout until it's completed (and completed well). This goes for my daughter as well.



    This is very common with both EF and ADD. Here are some things that have helped here:

    1. Make sure that no chore takes more than 10 minutes. This time may need to be greater or less for your daughter, but 10 minutes seems to be the timeframe that keeps my kids from feeling overwhelmed. However, this doesn't mean that they only do 10 minutes worth of chores a day!

    2. Chore charts don't work long-term here, so when I'm on top of my game, I just look at what needs to be done and then make a list on the chalkboard. Each item on the list takes no more than 10 minutes. We then divide the list evenly between the kids. Usually they each have two things (older kids are assigned the extra if there's an uneven number). Because each task is no more than 10 minutes (often no more than 5), the kids don't feel overwhelmed. It's also modeling how to break a large task into smaller pieces.

    I have to get to work, but I hope something here helps! Please keep sharing/asking questions!
    This entire response is gold. I wish I had an hour (or two) to reply. Just wanted to say, “Well done.” *This* was very common at our house up until about a year ago. Now we just struggle with attention, focus, fidgety energy and an occasional sour attitude about school. But that’s all cake compared to the all out war I was engaged in years previous (yikes, that was hard). Now the biggest frustrations are generally the 472 interruptions in our day (aka The Toddler). I’m glad you listed what ADHD was like (Yes, that is a dragon. You can draw stick figures after school.) It gave me food for thought!

    Leave a comment:


  • jen1134
    replied
    Re: Anxiety strategies?!?

    She knows all the answers and can do the work but working on the task is very difficult for her....This mama is tired of saying “write a-l-t-u-s” and none of the strategies I’ve tried seem to be helping.
    This sounds like distractibility more than anxiety?

    For example, my DS9 has moderate-severe ADHD and I repeat phrases like "sound out this letter...no, this one here", "yes, that does look like a dragon, but let's answer this math problem...this one right here", "you can draw stick figures after we finish this page" ad nauseam during our school time

    My DD7, on the other hand, has anxiety/perfectionism. For her, our days look like:
    "I can't do this!"
    "You can, just take your time."
    "But I don't know the answers!"
    "That's why we practice."
    " I can't do it!"
    "Let's take one problem at a time."
    We begin working together and, once she gets going, she'll be mad but will finish without much more prompting.

    My son needs me to be his focus coach through the entire assignment. Which one sounds more like your daughter?


    Our typical challenge is E generally gets out of sorts if anything doesn’t go as expected either in our schedule or in her expectations. Some examples are if I have to answer a phone call during school time (the doctor is about the only one I answer) or if the pattern in the lessons change. Recently, cursive changed from reviewing the letters to forming words and sentences. When there is a change she has an angry outburst and refuses to do her work. Depending on the day, it can take a few minutes to a few hours to get her back on task.

    These scream "executive function" to me. Combined with the distractibility, it could be that she's dealing with a form of ADD (there are a few different types). ADD is largely an executive function disorder, although executive function issues can exist without ADD. Sensory issues can also mimic or be combined with ADD and/or anxiety. Anxiety and ADD go hand-in-hand too (that would be one of my other children -- we've got all kinds of fun stuff going on here). This is where your pediatric psychologist comes in. They can help sort out exactly what she's dealing with, whether it's a single thing or a combination of challenges.

    Regardless of the "label" though, there are some things you can do. My DS14 and DD5 both react to change/the unexpected in the way you describe. They will either go into a full out tantrum (my oldest has mostly outgrown that), or completely shut down with their head in their arms. They will refuse to work and there is nothing under the sun that will make them change their mind. And discipline does nothing but make it TEN TIMES WORSE.

    Here are a few tools I pull from to prevent/handle these situations:

    1. I know the common recommendation is to "prepare them beforehand", but there's more to it than that. The time and method of "early warning" has to be just right in order for it to be effective. I have to prepare my two at least 24 hours in advance or I will have serious reactions on my hands. I also have to present it "matter-of-factly"; one iota of "stepping on eggshells" in fear of their reaction and the game is up. Even with significant time and proper presentation, I will usually have some reactions but they are milder and I can give the child space/time to work through it (unless there's a tantrum involved...see below) before they have to be cooperative.

    2. My 5yo has trouble getting started on her lessons, so it's often helpful to start or support with something I know she loves doing. This might be a movement activity from SC1, or sitting on my lap to do her work, or reminding her excitedly that she's able to work in Book D today (since she just finished Book C and Book D was her big goal).

    3. If they shut down, I've found the biggest help is to do nothing. The more you try to convince, cajole or threaten the worse it will get. Some examples:

    This morning, my son was upset about a schedule change so he completely shut down -- right when he was supposed to be studying for math. So I let him sit there while I presented his brother's math lesson. By the time I was ready to teach his lesson, he was good to go.

    If my 5yo shuts down during a lesson, I've found the best thing to do is to tell her "Let me know when you're ready." This doesn't mean that she gets to go play. She has to stay in her seat until she's ready to work again. If she won't stay in her seat, I then place her on my lap. This sometimes leads to an escalation where she starts throwing a fit, but I keep holding and rocking her and she eventually calms down and tells me (or indicates) that she's ready to return to her work.

    4. If they tantrum (hopefully this doesn't happen with your daughter, but if it does): we've had tantrums here that have ranged from stomping feet to throwing belongings to tipping furniture to putting dents in my walls and doors. We make clear that this behavior is unacceptable, but by this point they're completely out of control of their own reactions. For my younger one, we hold/rock. For the older one, I physically contain. For example, something had set him off so he shut down. He then decided that he would start pushing other people's buttons by pushing their book bins into the schoolwork they were trying to do. I moved his chair a few feet away from the school table (with him in it!) and then held the chair with one hand while reaching across the table with my other hand to continue my 7 year old's reading lesson. At one point, I told him half-jokingly that I would sit in his lap if that was what it took to keep him in his seat. This went on for 30 minutes. If I had done anything else though, it would have devolved into complete chaos/anger.

    That being said, IF THEY CROSS THE LINE, and attempt/actually do physically hurt someone or throw something, they are placed on immediate blackout. No toys, books, friends, etc. for a set amount of time, depending on the severity of the action. This works best for my son since he's older. For my daughter, my husband will usually intervene and take her upstairs to her room. He surfs the web on his phone while she calms down, removed from the situation. If my husband isn't home, I continue with the holding/rocking. This has led to some scratch marks and bruises on my arms and legs (she's an intense kid), but it keeps things from escalating further.

    5. If they don't come around: if they refuse to return to their work then they remain on blackout until it's completed (and completed well). This goes for my daughter as well.

    The sense of being overwhelmed by a task happens in other areas of her life; for example, room cleaning. In other areas she struggles to accept directions from other people including her dad.
    This is very common with both EF and ADD. Here are some things that have helped here:

    1. Make sure that no chore takes more than 10 minutes. This time may need to be greater or less for your daughter, but 10 minutes seems to be the timeframe that keeps my kids from feeling overwhelmed. However, this doesn't mean that they only do 10 minutes worth of chores a day!

    2. Chore charts don't work long-term here, so when I'm on top of my game, I just look at what needs to be done and then make a list on the chalkboard. Each item on the list takes no more than 10 minutes. We then divide the list evenly between the kids. Usually they each have two things (older kids are assigned the extra if there's an uneven number). Because each task is no more than 10 minutes (often no more than 5), the kids don't feel overwhelmed. It's also modeling how to break a large task into smaller pieces.

    I have to get to work, but I hope something here helps! Please keep sharing/asking questions!

    Leave a comment:


  • VAmom
    replied
    Re: Anxiety strategies?!?

    Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
    I have to get our school day started (or I'll end up with non-cooperation as well!) but I wanted to tell you that I have two children in particular who have been this way their entire lives. It sounds like your daughter has trouble with what they call "mental flexibility" or "black and white" thinking -- with a dose of distractibility for good measure It can look like anxiety, but anxiety is a symptom not the root.

    I'll share more later, but wanted to let you know that there IS hope. My older child who deals with this has come such a long way. It's something he will always struggle with, but he's made amazing progress the past couple of years. There's a lot that went into that, so I'll share more after school!

    In the meantime, since she's able to articulate her feelings well, dig a little deeper and ask why school was easier yesterday. Their reasons/perceptions can be completely unexpected!
    This is interesting! The developmental ped diagnosed anxiety when she was three. I said that I wanted to try working on things at home and to see if she “out grew” it. Fast forward 4 years later and the problems don’t seem to be going away but getting worse. Some of the other non-school struggles that I shared with the Dr. is she has difficulty taking directions from others (her dad giving directions at bedtime instead of me,) and new people or settings. This definitely gives me some food for thought. *off to Google mental inflexibility*

    Heidi

    Leave a comment:


  • jen1134
    replied
    Re: Anxiety strategies?!?

    Originally posted by VAmom View Post
    Jennifer,

    I was all set to reply and then yesterday school went beautifully for us so I’ve been puzzling over what was different about yesterday than all the other days.

    Our typical challenge is E generally gets out of sorts if anything doesn’t go as expected either in our schedule or in her expectations. Some examples are if I have to answer a phone call during school time (the doctor is about the only one I answer) or if the pattern in the lessons change. Recently, cursive changed from reviewing the letters to forming words and sentences. When there is a change she has an angry outburst and refuses to do her work. Depending on the day, it can take a few minutes to a few hours to get her back on task. In the cursive example, I had warned her that we were nearing the end of the review and would be doing something different.

    She will also avoid doing her work if she sees an opportunity, such as me stepping out of the room to use the restroom or helping another child.

    E has very high expressive language and vocabulary so I asked her what made yesterday different. She said that yesterday’s work felt easier and hoped today would be too. I’m not sure where to go because the work was the same as it always was. She knows almost every answer but hates writing. We are working on pencil grip which I’m hoping will help in the long run.

    The sense of being overwhelmed by a task happens in other areas of her life; for example, room cleaning. In other areas she struggles to accept directions from other people including her dad.

    I’ve tried to teach her how to do deep breathing, I’ve created task charts, and tried to create spaces for her to work with fewer distractions.

    I feel like I’m rambling but I hope this helps clarify. This has been going on for a long time and seems to be getting worse as the workload continues to increase. I love MP, and teaching her. My fear is that in our current state one of us is going to burn out.

    Heidi

    I have to get our school day started (or I'll end up with non-cooperation as well!) but I wanted to tell you that I have two children in particular who have been this way their entire lives. It sounds like your daughter has trouble with what they call "mental flexibility" or "black and white" thinking -- with a dose of distractibility for good measure It can look like anxiety, but anxiety is a symptom not the root.

    I'll share more later, but wanted to let you know that there IS hope. My older child who deals with this has come such a long way. It's something he will always struggle with, but he's made amazing progress the past couple of years. There's a lot that went into that, so I'll share more after school!

    In the meantime, since she's able to articulate her feelings well, dig a little deeper and ask why school was easier yesterday. Their reasons/perceptions can be completely unexpected!

    Leave a comment:


  • VAmom
    replied
    Re: Anxiety strategies?!?

    Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
    Hi, Heidi.

    Have you listened to this podcast we recorded earlier in the year about dealing more effectively with a child who struggles with anxious thoughts? We mention some tips & strategies. Currently it is the podcast 4th from the top via the above link.
    Thank you Cheryl! I tried finding it via the old post but couldn’t see it on the HSLDA website. I will listen to it today while I fold some laundry.

    Heidi

    Leave a comment:


  • VAmom
    replied
    Re: Anxiety strategies?!?

    Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
    I've dealt with anxiety since I was 9 and two of my children deal with it to varying degrees. Because anxiety can manifest in so many different ways, can you tell us more specifically how it's impacting her/her schoolwork?
    Jennifer,

    I was all set to reply and then yesterday school went beautifully for us so I’ve been puzzling over what was different about yesterday than all the other days.

    Our typical challenge is E generally gets out of sorts if anything doesn’t go as expected either in our schedule or in her expectations. Some examples are if I have to answer a phone call during school time (the doctor is about the only one I answer) or if the pattern in the lessons change. Recently, cursive changed from reviewing the letters to forming words and sentences. When there is a change she has an angry outburst and refuses to do her work. Depending on the day, it can take a few minutes to a few hours to get her back on task. In the cursive example, I had warned her that we were nearing the end of the review and would be doing something different.

    She will also avoid doing her work if she sees an opportunity, such as me stepping out of the room to use the restroom or helping another child.

    E has very high expressive language and vocabulary so I asked her what made yesterday different. She said that yesterday’s work felt easier and hoped today would be too. I’m not sure where to go because the work was the same as it always was. She knows almost every answer but hates writing. We are working on pencil grip which I’m hoping will help in the long run.

    The sense of being overwhelmed by a task happens in other areas of her life; for example, room cleaning. In other areas she struggles to accept directions from other people including her dad.

    I’ve tried to teach her how to do deep breathing, I’ve created task charts, and tried to create spaces for her to work with fewer distractions.

    I feel like I’m rambling but I hope this helps clarify. This has been going on for a long time and seems to be getting worse as the workload continues to increase. I love MP, and teaching her. My fear is that in our current state one of us is going to burn out.

    Heidi

    Leave a comment:


  • cherylswope
    replied
    Re: Anxiety strategies?!?

    Originally posted by VAmom View Post
    My eldest is 7 and doing MP2. She struggles with anxiety and is set to see the pediatric psychology team in February. She hasn’t received any therapy or medication to date. In the meantime, accomplishing her school work continues to be a challenge. She knows all the answers and can do the work but working on the task is very difficult for her.

    What are some anxiety strategies? This mama is tired of saying “write a-l-t-u-s” and none of the strategies I’ve tried seem to be helping.

    Thanks!
    Heidi
    Hi, Heidi.

    Have you listened to this podcast we recorded earlier in the year about dealing more effectively with a child who struggles with anxious thoughts? We mention some tips & strategies. Currently it is the podcast 4th from the top via the above link.

    Leave a comment:


  • jen1134
    replied
    Re: Anxiety strategies?!?

    Originally posted by VAmom View Post
    My eldest is 7 and doing MP2. She struggles with anxiety and is set to see the pediatric psychology team in February. She hasn’t received any therapy or medication to date. In the meantime, accomplishing her school work continues to be a challenge. She knows all the answers and can do the work but working on the task is very difficult for her.

    What are some anxiety strategies? This mama is tired of saying “write a-l-t-u-s” and none of the strategies I’ve tried seem to be helping.

    Thanks!
    Heidi

    I've dealt with anxiety since I was 9 and two of my children deal with it to varying degrees. Because anxiety can manifest in so many different ways, can you tell us more specifically how it's impacting her/her schoolwork?

    Leave a comment:


  • VAmom
    started a topic Anxiety strategies?!?

    Anxiety strategies?!?

    My eldest is 7 and doing MP2. She struggles with anxiety and is set to see the pediatric psychology team in February. She hasn’t received any therapy or medication to date. In the meantime, accomplishing her school work continues to be a challenge. She knows all the answers and can do the work but working on the task is very difficult for her.

    What are some anxiety strategies? This mama is tired of saying “write a-l-t-u-s” and none of the strategies I’ve tried seem to be helping.

    Thanks!
    Heidi
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