Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

Homeschooling success with autistic/SPD child?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Homeschooling success with autistic/SPD child?

    My husband and I are looking into the Simply Classical curriculum for our five year old son, James. He is our oldest child and has been diagnosed with sensory processing disorder, and is likely on the spectrum, though we don't have an official diagnosis yet. He's high functioning and we have been taking him to speech and occupational therapy for a few months now.

    We live in a town where there is a classical charter school. We had always envisioned sending our children there, but recently decided on homeschooling for many reasons. Our three year old has type 1 diabetes, and the classical school does not have a nurse there full time. James also has a severe tree nut allergy that requires us to have an Epi-pen on hand. We checked out the Simply Classical Curriculum and it's perfect for James.

    Recently, we had a discussion with a relative who works as an OT at a public school. We trust her opinion very much, as she works with children like James all the time. She basically told us that unless we send him to a public school so he can get the services they provide, James will not do well. He has meltdowns and outbursts when there's a change in routine or something unexpected happens in our day. He has severe separation anxiety when I leave him and my husband stays home with him. We have only ever left him with immediate family members for babysitters. She told us that this will not improve, but only get worse if we continue to keep him home and not allow him the challenges that will come with being in a classroom with other children and unfamiliar adults.

    We are struggling so much with this conversation. We want to do what is best for all our children. We believe homeschooling is the right thing to do, but we don't want to hinder James. We don't know anyone personally that has home schooled an SPD/autistic child and I think mostly what we are looking for is encouragement and success stories. Thanks!

    #2
    Re: Homeschooling success with autistic/SPD child?

    Welcome to the forum, Mackenzie!

    I have not yet compiled all of our SC testimonials, but here are a few to print & read.

    Some are from homeschoolers with children on the autism spectrum:


    SC Testimonials

    SC Book
    "If you think you are out of hope -- get this book! Two of our children were adopted through foster care, and both are quite low-functioning, although the non-verbal one is probably higher functioning than the one who "has words" but isn't able to use them effectively.
    This book brought me SO MUCH HOPE. ... I was almost in tears last night, after having gotten everybody to bed, and desperate to dive in to see if this book lived up to the expectations I had after reading reviews of it. Due to the needs of these two children, I have all but lost my ability to focus--and reading "deep" books is not even something I seem capable of any more, especially at night when I fall into bed exhausted. I was instantly captivated by the author's story, as well as her ability to speak to me in terms my ever-shrinking brain could comprehend. ... I couldn't put this book down--I felt like this is the lifesaver that even specialists couldn't send a drowning woman.
    I feel like I found somebody who understands my life!" – A.N.

    "Your book has been the biggest game changer to our homeschool. We have always homeschooled, but you have inspired me to offer all six children a beautiful education, regardless of their and my limitations."
    -- Jennifer

    Success of the Simply Classical Curriculum
    based on reports of children with these diagnoses:

    ADHD
    Anxiety
    Apraxia of speech
    Auditory Processing Disorder
    Autism Spectrum Disorder
    Bipolar disorder
    Cerebral palsy
    Depression
    Developmental Coordination Disorder
    Down syndrome
    Dyscalculia
    Dysgraphia
    Dyslexia
    Executive Function Disorder
    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD/FAE)
    Hearing Impairment
    Hypotonia
    Intellectual disability
    Language Disorder
    Memory Weaknesses
    Mental Illness
    "Minimally Verbal" and Nonverbal
    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
    Oppositional Defiant Disorder
    Sensory Integration Disorder
    Sensory Processing Disorder
    Social Communication Disorder
    Speech and Language Disorders
    Vision Impairment
    Visual Processing Disorder
    Visual-Spatial Learner

    From our Simply Classical Curriculum homeschoolers:

    Level A

    "I am so excited about your special needs packages. I have not found anything else like them in the homeschool market.
    I am the parent of a child with severe mental insufficiency and developmental delay. She is also visually impaired and has autistic tendencies. She is six years old who functions basically on a two-year-old level, but without as much cognitive reasoning skills.
    I just wanted to thank you for making this special needs homeschool journey a little less lonely.
    Someone finally gets it! Thank you." -JB

    "I started level A with my 4 yr old son this past week. My husband and I are now completely sold on this curriculum. My son is already making a ton of progress and today he talked to the lady at our local store and said "please" to her (usually he won't say anything ....). He wakes up wanting to do school each morning. I told him we would have the weekend off and he said he still wants to do school anyway. He even started saying a couple simple prayers out loud as well! My husband was a bit on the skeptical side, but told me tonight that he's glad I got the curriculum and that we need to keep going with it. I wanted to share how just one week has helped so much!! -- Melissa

    "For my son, working on pointing (in the first level, Simply Classical Level A) has been huge and now he can isolate his finger and point, and as a result is exploring his environment more, pointing at pictures (non-verbal) to ask what is on the picture. -- Cortney



    Level B
    “So my son went from never even wanting to pick up a pencil or crayon to drawing! Huge improvements with this program. Moments like this let you step back and really see something amazing." -- Aurora

    "The pre-writing skills are one of my favorite things about the special needs curriculum!! I was thinking, 'What? This can be FUN?' (Because we were not having fun before the Simply Classical Curriculum. Before, there were many tears!)" --J.


    Level C
    "I'm loving it! It's been a joy to do with my daughter. I appreciate the open and go of well crafted plans." -- FFA

    “"For the first time ever, she answered 'What day was it yesterday? Tomorrow?' WITH NO HELP!!! She gets it!! She really gets it!! ❤😊" -- Jatina


    Longer
    My son is 6.4 years old on the spectrum. He was relatively nonverbal until about 4.5 and was all over the place with sensory functioning. We are a family of 5, 2 boys and a baby girl.

    I want to say what a blessing this forum has been for me. He loves picture books and is still getting confident. But he can read! My son has hardly struggled in math. It just happens to be his strength so we continued with that and still going strong.

    He doesn't like handwriting but we do it daily. This has greatly improved too! He can form his own capital letters and numbers now!

    Our children will progress a little at a time and at other times they will take a huge developmental leap it will leave you speechless!

    I absolutely love the enrichment curriculum and how nicely it guides me through the comprehension questions. He does not like having to think and figure things out but the stories are so good that he never refuses to sit and read with me.

    I approach the reading as a time for me and him to sit on the couch with a treat and work on this together. We use whatever tools we need to get us to understand what is required of us. We re-read the book, we take as many days as we need, we laugh when we don’t understand very well, we pause to think (and pop in a few more hersheys kisses) and figure things out, we talk about the story at other times of our day, we don’t work on it when we don’t feel like our heads can handle it, and most of all I make sure we are doing it all together.

    Guess what. It works. My attitude makes a big difference.

    We will be moving on to level 1 sc when we are ready.

    Level 1
    "So excited to hear the next level is coming! I know it is a labor of love for you and your family. We are all so blessed by your experience and perseverance.
    I pulled out Little Bear and my son balked, 'There's no way I can read THAT!'. I said, 'Oh, I bet you'll surprise yourself.' I casually left it out on the table and later saw him browsing through it. My son's reading has just exploded this year. His confidence and fluency have grown.
    My mom told me over Christmas break that she didn't think he'd ever learn to read. It's all thanks to this program (I've tried lots of others as we all know). This program makes no leaps in knowledge. It's just little steps, one after another, that lead to results.
    I couldn't be happier with my switch to MP and especially Simply Classical." __ M.B.


    Level 2
    "After only two days, he is really learning! Thank you so much for the advice. He actually likes spelling now." -- Bethany

    “Tomorrow will mark the end of 6 weeks and the difference in my son is remarkable. Yes, we are still working through some of the big issues but life is much better. The suggestions for the daily schedule, the picture cards, ideas for managing his anger and a beautiful curriculum have been a much needed breath of fresh air. The curriculum is a wonderful fit and it is so wonderful to see him thriving in exciting ways.” – Heidi


    “I ended up purchasing more MP simply classical materials. The language lessons are absolutely wonderful!! I love them!! [T]hrough the language lessons his comprehension has soared!! The amount of copywork in these lessons is great too. It's the perfect pace for my son. He loves spelling and all the stories we read. I am amazed at how comfortable he has gotten with not getting things right, his ability to keep trying until he learns things. His expressive language through memorizing things is greatly improving! He is learning some beautiful things that will hopefully impress in his little heart and provide him comfort when he needs it. My son sits at the table each morning to wait for me to wait to get started! It's a wonderful sight. Thank you all for everything. Just everything!!” -- Nubia



    Longer
    "Now I am so much more hopeful and have such a sense of relief. I just wanted to say what a blessing this curriculum has been so far. We started 6 weeks ago with level 2, and I have seen such tremendous progress with my 8yo son.
    He has not been officially diagnosed with any learning disabilities, for a variety of reasons, but I suspect he has ADHD, dyslexia, dysgraphia, and dyscalculia. I have been a huge fan of Memoria Press for some time, and have used bits and pieces of it over the years with my oldest daughter. I never thought my son would be able to use MP. When I discovered Simply Classical I became intrigued. I was hesitant to try it though. It just seemed like so much, and my son doesn't do well with lots of work. He needs short to the point lessons. I have found this curriculum isn't nearly as time consuming as I feared and works really well with my son. He's growth has been tremendous in only 6 weeks.
    When we finished our last year's curriculum (we school year round) he was able to read CVC words and a handful of sight words. Yesterday, he was able to read "My Smart Dad" (in the At the Farm reader) with only a couple of corrections from me. I brought a tear to my eye.
    Reading for him has been such a struggle. While I by no means planned to give up, I had started considering that he may never read well. But now I am so much more hopeful and have such a sense of relief.
    He also did his spelling words and the most tricky word on the list was 'today'. I wasn't expecting him to be able to spell it. But he did without any help. 6 weeks ago he couldn't even spell 'to'.
    His printing has also greatly improved. He is even doing great with cursive. I have also been surprised with how much he likes doing recitations. I thought those might be a battle, and planned on skipping them if they were a cause of fights and/or meltdowns, but he actually looks forward to doing them.
    This curriculum has been such a blessing, and I am overwhelmed with the results so far. So for those of you debating about trying this curriculum I highly recommend it. I plan on using every level SC comes out with.” – E.T.


    Level 3
    “It just keeps getting better! I am enjoying the American history read-alouds myself!” – Christine



    More ...

    posted two years ago:

    https://forum.memoriapress.com/showt...Duffy-s-review

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Homeschooling success with autistic/SPD child?

      Originally posted by MackenzieRoss View Post
      My husband and I are looking into the Simply Classical curriculum for our five year old son, James. He is our oldest child and has been diagnosed with sensory processing disorder, and is likely on the spectrum, though we don't have an official diagnosis yet. He's high functioning and we have been taking him to speech and occupational therapy for a few months now.

      We live in a town where there is a classical charter school. We had always envisioned sending our children there, but recently decided on homeschooling for many reasons. Our three year old has type 1 diabetes, and the classical school does not have a nurse there full time. James also has a severe tree nut allergy that requires us to have an Epi-pen on hand. We checked out the Simply Classical Curriculum and it's perfect for James.

      Recently, we had a discussion with a relative who works as an OT at a public school. We trust her opinion very much, as she works with children like James all the time. She basically told us that unless we send him to a public school so he can get the services they provide, James will not do well. He has meltdowns and outbursts when there's a change in routine or something unexpected happens in our day. He has severe separation anxiety when I leave him and my husband stays home with him. We have only ever left him with immediate family members for babysitters. She told us that this will not improve, but only get worse if we continue to keep him home and not allow him the challenges that will come with being in a classroom with other children and unfamiliar adults.

      We are struggling so much with this conversation. We want to do what is best for all our children. We believe homeschooling is the right thing to do, but we don't want to hinder James. We don't know anyone personally that has home schooled an SPD/autistic child and I think mostly what we are looking for is encouragement and success stories. Thanks!
      Many people, including professionals, are not very familiar with homeschooling, so that may be where your relative is coming from. She may not have experience with homeschoolers, or may only have experience with a subset of homeschoolers that have not been very successful. I am sure she is coming from a good place and has good intentions, but there is absolutely no way she is right. There is no *one right way* to educate special needs children. She is likely right in that most private schools are not likely to have adequate resources for helping most special needs kids, but homeschooling is different. You are able to use whichever resources you discern are best for you children. You are free to change strategies and try new techniques without going through a plethora of red tape and bureaucracy, and you are going to have the very best interests of your children at heart. You do absolutely need support - both professional (OT/speech, doctors, etc) and social/emotional (other homeschoolers - especially veterans - either online or in person - both is best!). There are certainly ways to address emotional outbursts and stretch his ability to handle changes in routine/caregivers without putting him in school.

      I have three kids - my oldest and my youngest have special needs. Both have sensory differences, apraxia of speech, and ADHD. My oldest is very likely on the spectrum. He just turned 10. He certainly has social struggles. I've homeschooled since kindergarten. Maybe he would be better able to handle social interaction and changes in routine if he was in school. I guess that's possible. But I'm 100% positive he wouldn't be the happy, confident kid he is today if he was in an environment where he was always the *different, bad* kid. He'd likely experience bullying. He'd likely think he wasn't smart (he also has learning disabilities in reading and writing). Because I homeschool, because I am able to use curriculum that's right for him, he understands that his brain works differently than many other children, but he thinks he's very smart (because he is!), he's kind and loving, and he's happy and mostly confident.

      There are times where I wish I wasn't 100% responsible for his education, but all in all, I am so happy chose this course. I wish I'd known of MP and Simply Classical from the beginning! It would have made this journey smoother for sure.

      I recommend you read Cheryl's book Simply Classical if you haven't already. It is full of both encouragement/success stories and practical advice.
      Susan

      2020-21
      A (12) - Simply Classical 5/6
      C (11) - Simply Classical 5/6
      G (7) - Simply Classical 1

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Homeschooling success with autistic/SPD child?

        My youngest sounds very similar to your James. He has sensory processing disorder, level I/II autism with a high degree of verbal skills (he is highly verbal, but has low social skills-think Sheldon on Big Bang Theory) and a severe anxiety disorder. We tried a Mom's Day Out type of once a week daycare when he was 3-4 for the same reasons. Everyone kept telling us that if we didn't he'd only get worse. His behavior and overall well being seriously deteriorated that year. I won't paint a rose colored picture. We spent the entire first year of homsechool just to get him to sit at the table without a meltdown. He is old enough that all the SC levels weren't out then, so we started with the Junior Kindergarten. It took 2 years to get through it.

        He didn't learn to read until he was 8 1/2, but he went from pre-primer reading level to 4th grade reading level in 3 months once he finally got the hang of it. (Vision therapy was vital for him. His senses just don't integrate well on their own.)

        When he was 4, he literally could not go into our fenced backyard by himself without having a panic attack. He kicked the priest and blew out the candle during his baptism. We had to drag him, kicking and screaming, off playgrounds because people were letting their toddlers accost him and he was about to punch them or a child had mixed up those spinning picture things that had to be perfectly aligned. We were told not to bring him back to the daycare the next year. Stores were instant meltdown inducers.

        He's 9 1/2 now. He shakes hands at the Peace, even with strangers. He walks through stores, on good days he gives brief hugs, he acts in musical theater and plays the violin in a community orchestra (with a very understanding teacher, but he does it). He is doing Simply Classical 3 plus Greek Myths, and enjoys it at least to the level that 9 year old boys enjoy anything that interferes with play time. He goes outside on his own. He has conversations and is interested in other kids. He spends the night with family.

        We have time for him to go to extra therapies that are based on his needs not the very limited offerings based on the effects on his education (my oldest went from 5 hours per week of therapy in preschool to .5 hours that I had to fight for in public Kindergarten and his fine motor skills were in the .01 percentile) My youngest has gone to vision therapy, OT, PT, counseling (anxiety meds have helped him. I know they aren't for everyone, but he needs them), and speech therapy on horseback (hippotherapy). We have scheduling flexibility and the flexibility in teaching that didn't have him mocked and tormented and told he was stupid for not reading until he was 8 1/2. He went to a sleep away camp for 5 days this summer! They knew he's autistic and anxious and were prepared to manage him, but he chose to go and he was successful and had fun.

        The curriculum from Memoria is so much richer than anything they get in public school, too that I feel that he is getting a more robust education even if he isn't learning to code or any number of things the public school are wasting time on these days. He'd likely be stuck in a self contained classroom due to his inability to cope with the larger environment (at least when he was younger). And those classrooms are notoriously bad at actually *teaching*. Especially for a child who has a high IQ.

        In homeschool, he is learning how to cope with a world that is often painful and confusing to him. He has a safe place and trusts us. Having that lets him take some risks like going to camp and to better cope with things that bother him like going to stores. If he was spending every day in an environment that stressed him and caused him pain (like a noisy public school) then all of his at home time would be spent trying to recover and that's not how I want to spend his childhood. I don't believe he'd be where he is today if we had not homeschooled him.

        Sorry if this is too rambling. I am not always the best at organizing my thoughts, but overall I strongly believe that homeschooling with Simply Classical is the single best option for an SPD/autism kid.
        Miah - married to Warcabbage, 3 boys, BS in social work, AS in Electrical Engineering Technology

        Evulcarrot - 18, freshman in college, Medical Technology , mild autism
        Battlebroccoli - 17, lives with grandma, attends a special high school program part time
        Doomsprout - 10, highly verbal moderate autism, anxiety, motor delays, sensory processing issues - SC 4 with R&S 4

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Homeschooling success with autistic/SPD child?

          Just want to add, my oldest son also is ASD and has SPD and while the SC cores are newer to MP than we are we have used MP for years with him adapting as we went and I can say wholeheartedly that while at times challenging, homeschooling has been the best choice we could have made. Two of my other kids have learning issues as well and while often a bit chaotic it has been a joy to see how far they have come.

          We have had occupational therapists and speech therapists, and ds's neuropsychologist and pediatrician all take the time to encourage us in our choice to homeschool, commenting that it was always the best outcome they had seen with kids because it allowed a child' anxiety to remain the lowest while they learned to navigate an overwhelming world and that they were happy to see the way it benefited him.
          Winter 2020 :
          DD - Graduated!
          DS - core 10 with remediation/support
          DD - core 7 with remediation/support
          DS - core 5 with remediation/support

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Homeschooling success with autistic/SPD child?

            My youngest, Clara, has SPD, ADHD and something else that we are still trying to diagnose. When she went to public kindergarten she was absolutely miserable. She has a lot of social anxiety, but after taking her out of public school, and through taking her to local homeschool events, she has gotten to the point where she was actually able to join the swim team this fall with other children ages 7 through seniors in high school, plus several adult coaches. I do not think that sending her to school was helping her social abilities or teaching her much about interacting with others. She was basically only interacting with a couple of adults and a classroom full of kids exactly her age, which is nothing like the real world. Through homeschooling she is learning to interact with people of all ages. I think that your relative is well-meaning, but seems to be under the impression that homeschooling James means keeping him in the house all the time. That is not what we do, and I am sure that it is not what you will do. I encourage you to read Simply Classical by Cheryl Swope. You will learn so much. I also encourage you to look at this forum frequently. Every time I read things here I learn so much about how to help my own daughter, even from situations that are not exactly the same.
            JeJe Greer
            Mom to:
            Stella (8M with 9th grade literature, writing, and Henle Latin)
            Clara (Combination of SC 5/6 and 4th New User)

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Homeschooling success with autistic/SPD child?

              I wanted to add my experiences of homeschooling my son with Simply Classical too. He is 5 1/2 and diagnosed with autism. He is high functioning, sensory issues aren't what they used to be, but one of the reasons for that is that he is at home, and he's more able to communicate with me about what's going on, we can still have meltdowns at the shop etc.

              It is really hard when a professional, or someone who has had authority in your life speaks out so decidedly about a matter like homeschooling and how it's going to lead to bad outcomes for your child. I've had it from my parents, and from a psychologist they got to come and assess my children and tell me the number one thing I should do for them is put them in school. The outcomes for kids really are impacted by the choices that parents make, the help that children (and parents) receive...and that is a heavy weight to bear.

              My daughter (who is not ASD, but has had sensory and, shall we say, behavioural challenges - she's a super intense person) turned 8 last week and my mum, who still entirely disapproves of our homeschooling decision, had to admit how she'd really 'come on' after a number of 'worrying years'. (She later commented on the need to have kids be in 'culture' - as in mainstream society's culture, a problem in families where there are lots of children apparently...so I'm sure she thinks my daughter has matured in spite of our choices not because of them!).

              Last year I nearly had to end a friendship with someone very dear to me because, as a teacher she felt I was making all the wrong decisions...And let me know about it, and how abnormal my daughter was at each and every opportunity - with the explicitly stated implication that school will straighten her out. (She also has been surprised at my daughter's maturing!). My strong intuition has been that school would have made things worse for her...and the vehement reactions that continue just make me smile now, they are so inconsistent!

              It scares people because they have made mistakes themselves and this surely must be a mistake cause it's not 'normal', or they haven't been able to do it for their children and wish they could or they just can't see outside that paradigm of school and society knowing best.

              The psychologist who saw my kids at my parents request when my son was turning 4 said to me that 'we only take *our* children out of school when there gets to be too much bullying'. Oh boy that made me mad!!! According to this lady kindy kids are 'kind' and make allowances that older kids don't. Quite honestly, I haven't seen this. At our old church the other kids my sons age just flat out ignored him. He'd be trying to ask something, say hi, and his *really* good efforts would be ignored, to the point I would move in and say "Hey ..., Jonny was just saying how much he likes your toy/asking if he can play with you ." And they'd shrug their shoulders and ignore him still. And these were kids from really good families!

              When I did the Hanen 'Talkability' course last year one thing that really stuck with me was about finding good playmates for my child. When your child has special needs this gets harder. But when you are with them, you can see what's going on, coach your child in their engagement as necessary, and know when it's just not a great 'match' and move on. Some kids are going to like your kid, your kid will like other kids and these are the best situations to work on social skills in.

              My Jonny would be lost in school. Totally lost. I shudder to think. My husband and I are wanting to, have on our urgent to do list, to get my life insurance bumped up more than twice where it's at. It'll be more than his...but we both know that, especially for Jonny if something happened to me he will need to have one on one tuition if he is to be able to have the best opportunity at life. And that costs a lot if money.

              And as for Simply Classical...it is so great! My son's therapist is so frequently either recommending things that we're already doing in Level C or, when I tell her what we're doing she's *so* impressed by it. Genuinely impressed. She's also totally baffled by us as a family. We're really transparent about our issues and trying to improve our capacity to help, our kids play outside (our yard is awful but it's big and there's nothing my two youngest like more than to sit in a good hold they've dug!), we cut all screen time (recently adding Mister Rogers after lunch so I can get a rest as I am very pregnant)...that would be so much more difficult if he was at school, with all the other kids watching his favourite shows (innocuous enough but it does something very very not good to him).

              It is scary to do something different, and just because it's different doesn't automatically make it good. But I would highly recommend Simply Classical as being a good kind of different way. I feel like it's teaching me to be not just a parent but a teacher. Things I just would not think to teach/do in a million years. Getting access to the wisdom of someone like Cheryl is invaluable and it gives me a lot of confidence as I move forward.

              Praying for you that God will give you clarity and discernment as to what is best for your son and family as you go through this decision making process!

              Let us know how things go .

              (One more thing, there are professionals out there who will be supportive of your decisions, and who will connect with your child better because of it. We now have a good speech therapist, a good ABA program supervisor and in the past my daughter saw a fantastic psychologist...I find it helpful to mention that we are a homeschooling family at the very first conversation...the response is a good indicator!)
              Last edited by sarahandrew; 12-12-2017, 05:05 PM.
              Sarah

              Aussies from Sydney, Australia
              Miriam 10yo
              Jonathan 8yo
              Elissa 5yo
              Thomas 2yo
              Caleb 2 months

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Homeschooling success with autistic/SPD child?

                Hi Mackenzie,

                I hope you've been encouraged by all the testimonies here! Our son on the spectrum is 14 now, and homeschooling him has been one of the best decisions we ever made. He attended public school in a special education program for 1 1/2 years at ages 6-7. By the time we pulled him out, he was acting out and hitting/kicking his younger siblings as soon as he walked in the door from school because he was so stressed and overstimulated. And this was with an incredibly kind and loving special ed aide accompanying him at all times in the classroom. The best the school can offer doesn't compare to orderly, one-on-one instruction such as you will find with the Simply Classical curriculum. We didn't even have that resource at that time, but homeschooling still benefited our son in innumerable ways and continues to.

                The separation anxiety is something you can work on later when he is older and stabilized in other areas. I wouldn't worry about that right now and would focus on getting your plan for his education in place. It's just not true that that's never going to get better if he is homeschooled. It may just fade as he meets with success through homeschooling.
                Catherine

                2020-21
                DS17
                DS15
                DS13
                DD13
                DS8
                DD5
                DS 2.5

                Homeschooling 4 with MP
                2 in classical school

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Homeschooling success with autistic/SPD child?

                  Thank you all for your responses. It's so encouraging to my husband and me. We'll post again when we come to a decision. Thanks so much!

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X