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Helps for harnessing stims

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    #16
    Re: Helps for harnessing stims

    You may also appreciate this:


    You Can Give Your Child the Joy of Knowing
    with the full story embedded in the article.

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      #17
      Re: Helps for harnessing stims

      Thank you! I enjoyed the video last night. My, how far he has come. It is good to see those instances and stories. I spent quite a bit of time in older forum threads reading through other families' information on dealing with issues of non verbal and stims.
      This has led me to another question (Cheryl, you did say I could ask more.) .
      I noticed many other families are doing this with younger siblings in tow. How are they managing this level of one on one teaching while attending to the needs of their youngest?
      Our son is 6 and I have to be right with him either at his side with a hand on His leg or back or him on my lap. I also have to sometimes touch his check softly to signal or prompt a response.
      We have a one year old as well who loves to be in the thick of things but Jesse (our 6 yr old) cannot focus with him along side.
      Anita, you may have some suggestions here. Or other threads to direct me to.
      Just some background...we also have a 15 and 13 year old whom I home schooled through 6th and 7th grades, so schooling two at a time is not a new concept. I tried many tricks I used when they were young but our new set of circumstances doesn't seem to work with my usual tricks of the trade. I know others are doing this, and doing it well. I guess my question is...how? Without help of another adult or caregiver.
      Thanks again for indulging my specific line of questioning.

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        #18
        Re: Helps for harnessing stims

        Originally posted by Juliepauldesign@gmail.com View Post
        Thank you! I enjoyed the video last night. My, how far he has come. It is good to see those instances and stories. I spent quite a bit of time in older forum threads reading through other families' information on dealing with issues of non verbal and stims.
        This has led me to another question (Cheryl, you did say I could ask more.) .
        I noticed many other families are doing this with younger siblings in tow. How are they managing this level of one on one teaching while attending to the needs of their youngest?
        Our son is 6 and I have to be right with him either at his side with a hand on His leg or back or him on my lap. I also have to sometimes touch his check softly to signal or prompt a response.
        We have a one year old as well who loves to be in the thick of things but Jesse (our 6 yr old) cannot focus with him along side.
        Anita, you may have some suggestions here. Or other threads to direct me to.
        Just some background...we also have a 15 and 13 year old whom I home schooled through 6th and 7th grades, so schooling two at a time is not a new concept. I tried many tricks I used when they were young but our new set of circumstances doesn't seem to work with my usual tricks of the trade. I know others are doing this, and doing it well. I guess my question is...how? Without help of another adult or caregiver.
        Thanks again for indulging my specific line of questioning.
        Hi Julie!

        No worries, ask away -- that's what we are here for.

        The answer to "How?" is "The best you can." Figure out how long it takes to do a typical school day with your son. One hour? Two hours? And then school him during the time of day when he is freshest and most cooperative. While that's going on, have the older kids keep the baby occupied. Or, if she (?) is a late sleeper, school him before she wakes up.

        I have a special needs daughter -- in addition to my special needs son -- a rising kindergartner, AND a 13-month-old. It is BUSY at my house. I have no older kids to keep the baby occupied so I've given her a busy box of board books and interesting things. She plays with those (or the dog or the cats or the dishes in the cabinets or her olde brother) until her morning nap. Morning nap is when we get most of the challenging work done. It just takes patience.

        Remember: the baby won't be a baby forever! This is the season to develop your homeschooling habits. The baby will start to understand the schooling schedule and adapt. Just be consistent and keep at it. It will be bumpy for awhile but then everything will fall in line.

        Feel free to PM me!

        XOXOXO
        Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
        Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
        Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
        Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

        “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
        ~Pope St John Paul II

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