Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

    I'm struggling to choose between Charlotte Mason and Simply Classical Education. Is there anyone else who considered CM? What made you choose Classical? Has anyone actually used both?

    #2
    Re: Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

    I love CM. I love Simply Classical. Theyre actually very close intention-wise. CM is pretty classical. There are other posts that discusses that.

    Personal opinion.

    I love Simply Charlotte Mason history. The idea that history is connected to geography study. I think they drag out early history a bit. Their rotation is 6 years, I think. Sure spend 2 years on ancients so you're not rushing through Genesis, but 4 years to get to medieval is too slow for me. But the history after that...the idea of studying as a family really appeals to me. It is literature rich. It covers us and world history, together.

    I prefer CM picture and composer study. Studying fewer artists over the year as opposed to a new piece every week with MP. SCM guides schedule these out for you. But, the music and art with MP does connect it to the other enrichment items like read-aloud. We actually do both. We do MP enrichment and SCM picture study.

    We try to get outside frequently, an emphasis of CM.

    But, core skills wise, we're all MP. Rod and staff math, first start reading in kindergarten, and lit guides in older grades. We'll be adding latin next year (an emphasis of both MP and SCM).

    We do Memoria Press recitation, Bible, and writing. Specifically, we do simply classical 2 of those. This is the absolute strength of simply classical. The pace and kinesthetic activities used to teach writing, reading, and arithmetic can't be beat. Period.

    So, your question: can you combine them? Yes.

    Use MP for math, reading, writing, recitation, Bible, Latin, enrichment and cursive instruction.

    You can add in history, Bible, geography from Simply Charlotte Mason as time permits.

    The priority is MP academics. We do the history read-aloud from CM at bedtime pretty regularly. We do CM picture study as part of our morning gathering time.

    I think both programs complement each other nicely. But, MP gets done far more regularly in our house than CM. I emphasize short lessons, varied skills, and nature study.
    Married to DH for 13 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

    DS10- Simply Classical 4 / Grade 3 Classic Core,
    DD8- Grade 2 Classic Core,
    DD 6- Classic Core Kindergarten

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

      I've done both. With my oldest from Prek-5, we did mostly CM. My second son followed along K-2. I loved the emphasis on outdoors, nature, habits, good literature, and being a kid. I often felt anxious planning all the things we were to get to in a week. I did not do a good job of transitioning him from oral narrations to written. If I hadn't read a book they were reading, I didn't know what to ask or if their narrations were correct.

      Last summer, we started 3M with both, mostly because my husband wants the boys to learn Latin.
      It's been a blessing. Turns out my oldest needs the repetition, the structure. I feel certain that if SC had been there when he was younger, it would have helped us. The activities that he needed, the movement, the repetition, the incremental steps are all there planned out.

      In your ultimate decision, consider the special needs of your child. Also, know that I learned about teaching young children from CM. I apply CM principals to what we do know. I'm glad we did it, but I needed more help to teach my particular son and he needed more.
      Michelle in Central Tx
      DS 12 (4A modified), Ds 9 (4M), DS 5 (K)

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

        Charlotte Mason is a subset of Classical education, I think. Latin Centered Classical could maybe be considered a type of classical as well?

        I attempted to teach my children with a Charlotte Mason curriculum -- Mater Amabilis (the free Catholic CM curriculum). It just didn't work out for us. I was adding in too many things along with trying to teach the basics of reading, writing, and math. Also my oldest just could not narrate at all when we tried. It seems to me that many CM curriculums go with many but not much rather than much not many like MP.

        Here is what drew me to CM -- all the great books!, the idea of nature and music/art study. Aside from the books, we have yet to consistently implement nature study or CM style art/music study in our house. We may do music/art the CM way -- probably using SCM materials after completing the 2nd grade core. We'll see. I do try to incorporate the books -- we listen to This Country of Ours in the Car regularly, I make sure our bedtime read-alouds are quality books. Some are from CM booklists, some are from other booklists, but the kids don't get to just go to the library and pick whatever they want. We use religion materials from CM lists and we have really enjoyed that.

        Here is what didn't work for me with CM -- it was not structured enough and it wasn't cohesive. I was trying to keep up with too many parts -- history, fables, tales, geography, science -- in addition to writing, reading, and math. Also lots of CM programs have you select your own reading, writing, and math programs. This just didn't work for us. It wasn't until we came to MP that we were able to have programs that really worked together well.

        For us, MP really provided the plan -- I don't have time to plan things, and I can't put together anything better than MP already has. We only add what we need -- different reading/spelling for my oldest with dyslexia and a speech & language disorder, religion, super simple art (because my DD loves it), and extra literature that is not part of school.
        Susan

        2018-2019
        A (10) - Barton, R&S math 3, SC 3
        C (9) - Barton, R&S math 2, SC 3
        G (5) - Simply Classical C

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

          I will agree with everyone else that over all CM was just overwhelming for us/me! I really like having boxes to check! I don't check them all mind you and I don't necessarily check all the Monday boxes on Monday, but I know what is left, very easily.

          I feel with MP you can add some of the CM components in "free time", but skill wise, MP ensures they are being done and I don't have to wonder!

          A lot of threads on CM vs MP. The consensus seems to be CM for parenting/free time, MP for "school" as a nice compromise. (habit building, getting outside, etc)

          P.s - I think a lot of people use the CM book lists for free time/read aloud suggestions.
          Christine

          (2019/2020)
          DD1 8/23/09 - SC5/6
          DS2 9/1/11 - SC3,4, 5/6 combo
          DD3 2/9/13 -SC2 to start, MP1 second semester

          Previous Years
          DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4’
          DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2)
          DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK)

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

            Thank you so much for your thoughtful input. It seems the consensus is that CM may be prone to having holes and difficult to implement. I am very, very grateful for your willingness to share.

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

              One of the many things I have tried is CM. I have one real caution for you if your child has special needs. My older daughter, who is accelerated in everything, narrated like a (very wordy) pro. My special needs child could not narrate. We tried Simply Charlotte Mason for a term, and still use some of it for the the older. My special needs girl cannot understand much of the reading, cannot recall picture details for picture study, cannot discuss poetry (neither can her mother, so Stella basically just tells us both what it means), will not sing along with the hymns (although she will dance if we do), and could not learn to sew with the hand sewing video (although she did independently pick up a needle and thread since that session and has taught herself to sew really well). The long and the short of it is that the enrichment did not really enrich her, and the history went in one ear and out the other, usually while she distracted her sister from listening and played with the pets or dolls or just stuck her fingers in her ears. It was a really terrible experience for her. If your child does not have special needs I think it is a fine curriculum, though nowhere near as rigorous as the Memoria Press curriculum which offers much more training in how to think and reason.
              JeJe Greer
              Mom to:
              Stella (6M in 2018-2019)
              Clara (SC3 in 2018-2019)

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

                Very interesting to know. Since we are at the very beginning of our journey I have no way to predict which way my littles will go. We do have special needs in our household, but the child they told me would never walk or talk (is walking and babbling) shows the best problem solving skills of the three! I don't know what to expect! LOL! Jejegreer, I'd like to discuss this in greater depth via PM if you are willing.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

                  Originally posted by mhoward1999 View Post
                  I'm struggling to choose between Charlotte Mason and Simply Classical Education. Is there anyone else who considered CM? What made you choose Classical? Has anyone actually used both?
                  You've already received much great counsel here. I'm curious if you've read Cheryl Swope's book Simply Classical? If not, that might be a great next step to helping you decide. Based on the very last post you added to this thread, I think might find just what you need in that wonderful book.
                  Festina lentē,
                  Jessica P

                  SY2019-2020 · 8th MP Year
                  @ Home, HLN, & MPOA
                  S · 10th, MPOA Henle 3
                  D · 8th
                  D · 5th
                  S · 2nd

                  Highlands Latin Nashville Cottage School

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

                    Originally posted by pickandgrin View Post
                    You've already received much great counsel here. I'm curious if you've read Cheryl Swope's book Simply Classical? If not, that might be a great next step to helping you decide. Based on the very last post you added to this thread, I think might find just what you need in that wonderful book.
                    Thank you, Jessica. Yes, especially in the Preface and first four chapters, you will find clear answers to the philosophical questions, much of which is told in "story" form, so the reading is quick. Remaining chapters offer specifics on learning, behavior, and assessment with large doses of encouragement.

                    We integrate much of the wisdom from Charlotte Mason into our SC Curriculum:

                    -observational nature study from the early years (see My Nature Journal), which my own children adored,

                    -reading from and enjoying together real, engaging, beautiful books,

                    -forming habits and shaping loves,

                    -giving meaningful work and purposeful study (no needless busywork or "twaddle"), so the child has ample time to play outside and become interested in life.


                    At the same time, we know our special-needs children. They need systematic, diligent teaching with practice, practice, practice to learn with mastery of reading, writing, and arithmetic, and even with social skills. All must be explicitly taught. This requires structure and proven teaching strategies while focusing, in the classical framework, on all that is worth knowing.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

                      Originally posted by pickandgrin View Post
                      You've already received much great counsel here. I'm curious if you've read Cheryl Swope's book Simply Classical? If not, that might be a great next step to helping you decide. Based on the very last post you added to this thread, I think might find just what you need in that wonderful book.
                      I have not, but it IS on my wish list. I will have to move it up to the top of the list in priority of obtaining! Thank you for the recommendation.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

                        Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
                        Thank you, Jessica. Yes, especially in the Preface and first four chapters, you will find clear answers to the philosophical questions, much of which is told in "story" form, so the reading is quick. Remaining chapters offer specifics on learning, behavior, and assessment with large doses of encouragement.

                        We integrate much of the wisdom from Charlotte Mason into our SC Curriculum:

                        -observational nature study from the early years (see My Nature Journal), which my own children adored,

                        -reading from and enjoying together real, engaging, beautiful books,

                        -forming habits and shaping loves,

                        -giving meaningful work and purposeful study (no needless busywork or "twaddle"), so the child has ample time to play outside and become interested in life.


                        At the same time, we know our special-needs children. They need systematic, diligent teaching with practice, practice, practice to learn with mastery of reading, writing, and arithmetic, and even with social skills. All must be explicitly taught. This requires structure and proven teaching strategies while focusing, in the classical framework, on all that is worth knowing.
                        I will definitely obtain and read the book, though it is sounding more and more like SC is going to be the best fit for us.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

                          Originally posted by mhoward1999 View Post
                          Very interesting to know. Since we are at the very beginning of our journey I have no way to predict which way my littles will go. We do have special needs in our household, but the child they told me would never walk or talk (is walking and babbling) shows the best problem solving skills of the three! I don't know what to expect! LOL! Jejegreer, I'd like to discuss this in greater depth via PM if you are willing.
                          I am happy to discuss this with you. My email is jejegreer@comcast.net.
                          JeJe Greer
                          Mom to:
                          Stella (6M in 2018-2019)
                          Clara (SC3 in 2018-2019)

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
                            Re: Simply Classical vs Charlotte Mason

                            We integrate much of the wisdom from Charlotte Mason into our SC Curriculum:

                            -observational nature study from the early years (see My Nature Journal), which my own children adored,

                            -reading from and enjoying together real, engaging, beautiful books,

                            -forming habits and shaping loves,

                            -giving meaningful work and purposeful study (no needless busywork or "twaddle"), so the child has ample time to play outside and become interested in life.


                            At the same time, we know our special-needs children. They need systematic, diligent teaching with practice, practice, practice to learn with mastery of reading, writing, and arithmetic, and even with social skills. All must be explicitly taught. This requires structure and proven teaching strategies while focusing, in the classical framework, on all that is worth knowing.
                            I have been reading back on the Special Needs forum, and just came across this thread... I know it’s an “oldie” but it was definitely helpful! We homeschooled our older girls using a mix of CM, unit studies, and delight-directed learning, and it was such an enjoyable experience. The more gentle and relaxed we were, the better they seemed to love learning, and they soaked everything up! I was determined to do the same with our little guys, with lots of Charlotte Mason ideas and fun unit studies. When delays showed up, I went looking for a play-based preschool curriculum, but what I was finding wasn’t working... my oldest son wasn’t simply learning enough by play. I do think we may have warded off some possible sensory aversions with all the water beads, play dough, and shaving cream, but i’m totally beginning to understand that our kids need “systematic, diligent teaching” and that “all must be explicitly taught.” And I really need our days to feel more orderly than a bunch of quick, unrelated lessons and messy activities. I think we’ll probably continue with the purposeful play aspect in part of our day, but I’m definitely encouraged by seeing what is taught daily and systematically in SC! Thank you, Cheryl! ❤️

                            Also... after studying CM more intensely this time around, and then finding SC, I was truly surprised that there actually are quite a few similarities! In the 90’s, I think we did a more watered-down version of CM... some of the newer CM curriculums out there are much more systematic and planned. I felt like I was jumping ship from CM, but it’s feeling like more of a fine-tuning. I had honestly never thought we’d head in a classical direction with our homeschooling... and sometimes when I look ahead to upper levels I’m a little scared... but the step-by-step that I’m seeing in the lower levels looks so comforting!

                            Comment


                              #15
                              As a new member myself, I am very grateful that you added to this thread, so I was able to read it, too! There is so much that I did love about the CM philosophy and approach;I also love MP because there is common ground in so far as using real books and incorporating emphasis on picture and music study. We began our homeschooling journey nine years ago with a Classical mindset, but I became very distracted by CM resources and online groups, and many of the CM "purists" ideals that all connections must be completely made by the children.

                              As the special needs of my oldest made themselves more evident, putting that pressure on her without supports in place made narration very stressful. This year, she completed MP's "What's that Bird?" study with great enthusiasm and now considers herself an official "bird watcher." That course has been a gift that may serve her for the rest of her life and it would never have happened for her if I had done a purely CM approach. Reviewing the flashcards and listening to the calls online has helped her immensely when we do spend time in nature -- or our backyard.

                              So I have come back to more of a Classical approach for all of my children. All of the products that I have used by Memoria Press have pleased my special-needs child as well as myself.

                              Laura

                              Laura H.

                              DD: 13, special-needs
                              DD: 10
                              DD: 6
                              DD: 6

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X