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Reading in Cursive

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    Reading in Cursive

    Quick question:
    Are there helps embedded in the SC Levels for students who may have a hard time reading in cursive? Discrimination may pose a problem for some struggling readers.

    Thanks!
    Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
    Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
    Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
    Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

    “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
    ~Pope St John Paul II

    #2
    Re: Reading in Cursive

    Hi, Anita.

    Great "hint." Thank you! We have time to add this to the SC 3 CG.


    In SC 2, the multiple cursive-letter ID exercises are intended to help with this. If you need more than this right now, I would dedicate just a few minutes of cursive writing time to cursive reading. You can do this before he begins. Help him read the words he will write. Then have him write. Or let him write, and then have him go back and read. Or both.

    You might also begin writing him simple Mommy notes in cursive. "Let's go." "I like your hat!" If he cannot yet read joined letters, you might play a quick game of "Name That Letter" before or after his lesson. Write a letter on a mini white board. Have him rapid-fire name the letter. Swipe it clean. Write another. In other words, give him plenty of practice reading letters. Then move to words.

    Reading cursive is difficult at first. He is still learning letters, so much of this will come with practice. Even so, your question is a great reminder to be more intentional. Reading cursive is becoming a lost art, and not just for children with special learning needs!

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      #3
      Re: Reading in Cursive

      Thank you!

      He reads the entirety of Amelia Bedelia to us every day at lunch now (!!!) but trips up on the handwritten notes from "Mrs. Rogers" a bit. It just occurred to me that he might need a little more practice reading more than the simple CVC-level words in NAC 1 and his cursive practice sheets workbook. And that, of course, prompted me to wonder if someone else's student could benefit as well.

      Well done!
      Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
      Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
      Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
      Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

      “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
      ~Pope St John Paul II

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Reading in Cursive

        From the one-and-only Iris Hatfield, creator of New American Cursive, here are a few more tips as the student progresses in cursive writing.

        [The notes in brackets are mine.] Everything else is shared by Iris for this discussion:



        Of course, reading cursive is best accomplished by writing cursive. Here are some quick suggestions depending on the abilities of the student.



        · The student could start a cursive scrapbook to include a page for each letter of the alphabet. Search for examples that can be cut out of magazines and newspapers to place on each letter page. Scrapbook could also include pages of favorite words, notes written by friends and family.

        · Memoria Press has NAC wall charts that could be used as flash cards. [See also the NAC/manuscript poster.]

        · The child could trace words, starting with the often-used words such as in NAC Workbook 2 page 81. [We begin NAC 2 in SC 3.]

        · The Teach Yourself Cursive Workbook has two pages of “Other Cursive Capitals” to help students learn other cursive styles.

        · Play a game of reading the mail that is addressed in cursive.

        · Use the Startwrite/NAC software CD to print out the child’s name and the names of family and friends, special words that are meaningful to the child. Write notes with the software that would be easy for the child to read.

        · Develop a cursive pen pal.

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