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Long-division challenges for almost 14-year old

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    Long-division challenges for almost 14-year old

    My oldest is really trying but he just can't get long division. He's done long division before, but we went back for about a year to solidify his multiplication and short division and now he can't get the long division process straight. I've tried color-coding the steps, writing down an exemplar, putting a multiplication sign at the corner of the division bar, etc. but he's just not remembering what to do at each stage. Any ideas how to help him with this?
    Jennifer
    Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

    DS16
    MP: Lit 10, VideoText Algebra
    MPOA: High School Comp. II
    HSC: Spanish I, Conceptual Physics, Modern European History, and electives

    DS15
    MP: Biology, Lit 10, VideoText Algebra, Greek Tragedies
    MPOA: High School Comp. II, Fourth Form Latin
    HSC: Modern European History

    DS12
    7M with:
    Second Form Latin, EGR III, and HSC for US History

    DS11
    SC Level 4

    DD9
    3A, with First Form Latin (long story!)

    DD7/8
    Still in SC Level 2

    DD 4/5
    SC Level C

    #2
    Re: Long-division challenges for almost 14-year old

    Hi, Jen.

    "Teach and Re-teach were in a boat, and Teach fell out. Who was left?" Yep. Re-teach.

    (My husband and daughter can do Pete & Repeat for hours.)

    The good news here is that he knew long division before. It just had not made its way to his long-term memory when you switched math tasks, so you need to re-teach.

    We had a rhythmic clapped chant with our steps: Divide, Multiply, Subtract, Bring Down. We said it over and over. Whatever your steps, create something like this, say it over and over before starting, then work one step. Say it again to find the next step. Work that step. Say it again, and so on. Do this enough, and it should come back to him. At first, have him work only one step before reviewing the process. Gradually have him do two steps on his own, etc. You'll need to be there for every problem at first.

    Some would say, "calculator," but he is only 14. He will gain confidence by conquering this. And this multi-step task is so helpful for creating executive function practice with other multi-step tasks. I would persevere if you have the time and if he has the ability to re-learn.

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Long-division challenges for almost 14-year old

      Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
      Hi, Jen.

      "Teach and Re-teach were in a boat, and Teach fell out. Who was left?" Yep. Re-teach.

      (My husband and daughter can do Pete & Repeat for hours.)

      The good news here is that he knew long division before. It just had not made its way to his long-term memeac when you switched math tasks, so you need to re-teach.

      We had a rhythmic clapped chant with our steps: Divide, Multiply, Subtract, Bring Down. We said it over and over. Whatever your steps, create something like this, say it over and over before starting, then work one step. Say it again to find the next step. Work that step. Say it again, and so on. Do this enough, and it should come back to him. At first, have him work only one step before reviewing the process. Gradually have him do two steps on his own, etc. You'll need to be there for every problem at first.

      Some would say, "calculator," but he is only 14. He will gain confidence by conquering this. And this multi-step task is so helpful for creating executive function practice with other multi-step tasks. I would persevere if you have the time and if he has the ability to re-learn.

      I love this idea! Thank you so much!!
      Jennifer
      Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]

      DS16
      MP: Lit 10, VideoText Algebra
      MPOA: High School Comp. II
      HSC: Spanish I, Conceptual Physics, Modern European History, and electives

      DS15
      MP: Biology, Lit 10, VideoText Algebra, Greek Tragedies
      MPOA: High School Comp. II, Fourth Form Latin
      HSC: Modern European History

      DS12
      7M with:
      Second Form Latin, EGR III, and HSC for US History

      DS11
      SC Level 4

      DD9
      3A, with First Form Latin (long story!)

      DD7/8
      Still in SC Level 2

      DD 4/5
      SC Level C

      Comment

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