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TBI survivor: does not talk, hemiplegic. Level A?

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    TBI survivor: does not talk, hemiplegic. Level A?

    We've adopted a TBI survivor and their sibling. (TBI=Traumatic Brain Injury - what used to be called "shaken baby") Does not talk, though does say Daddy and Mama, quack, who, & ball. Can sign "eat" or "drink" with right hand only. Can shake head "no". The left side of the body does not work correctly, with the left arm being the worst, having little ability to control it, full tone. Has learned to walk in the last few months, turns 5 this spring. I downloaded the Level A: Assessing Readiness. 79% Yes/Emerging

    Are the Simply Classical lesson plans different than the Preschool lesson plans? They appear to utilize the same materials. We've made it to the above referenced accomplishments, but now feeling a little overwhelmed by school choices and not sure how to proceed. We homeschooled our eldest 3, back in the early 1990's after pulling them out of PS. They all graduated 15+ years ago. I'm rusty, to say the least, and a lot older. Just can't see these little ones attending PS. Yet overwhelmed at the thought of homeschooling them. But willing to give it my all. Could really use a support system, starting with some guidance. We already have the Preschool set for the neurotypical sibling. Just trying to figure out, for this fall, if SC A is basically the same as Preschool or what I should do?

    Thank you in advance for guidance. ~ Grace

    #2
    Re: TBI survivor: does not talk, hemiplegic. Level A?

    Grace,

    I'm going to let Cheryl handle advice for you, but I want to let you know that we will be glad to send you the Level A curriculum guide if you want to use it. It is basically the same as the Preschool guide, with some of the special-needs terminology removed. Just email sales@memoriapress.com, tell us that you already own the Preschool guide, and we'll be glad to send you the Level A one to use with your curriculum.

    Tanya

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      #3
      Re: TBI survivor: does not talk, hemiplegic. Level A?

      Dear Grace,

      Welcome. You are among friends. We even have one "rusty" (we prefer "veteran" ) homeschooling mom here who homeschooled 20+ years and then adopted a minimally verbal/medically fragile baby. This child began with Level A and is now in Level B. We have another young mom whose son said his first two-word sentence while working through Level A.


      Given your son's motor and language concerns, yes, teach from Level A. Use Tanya's generous offer to teach from the SC guide. Make notes. Review anything you need to review. If it takes longer than 34 weeks for this child than with the Preschool program for your other child, that is okay.

      With this child, plan on taking more time each day, being more intentional, and covering the same thing 4 days/week, even if it seems unnecessarily repetitive. Accommodate motor challenges, but otherwise try to keep the motor components, if you can.

      Meanwhile, assemble a team. Older can also be wiser. You cannot do this alone. A top PT, OT, & SPL will become your team, along with your medical team.

      Another suggestion from another not-so-young mom: Sometimes you can spend the therapy time observing the therapists closely and taking notes. Other times, use that therapy time to read a magazine or chat with other moms in the waiting room. Consider it your respite, while he receives services.

      If we can help in any other way, let us know.

      Cheryl

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        #4
        Re: TBI survivor: does not talk, hemiplegic. Level A?

        Originally posted by egmeridian View Post
        We've adopted a TBI survivor and their sibling. (TBI=Traumatic Brain Injury - what used to be called "shaken baby") Does not talk, though does say Daddy and Mama, quack, who, & ball. Can sign "eat" or "drink" with right hand only. Can shake head "no". The left side of the body does not work correctly, with the left arm being the worst, having little ability to control it, full tone. Has learned to walk in the last few months, turns 5 this spring. I downloaded the Level A: Assessing Readiness. 79% Yes/Emerging

        Are the Simply Classical lesson plans different than the Preschool lesson plans? They appear to utilize the same materials. We've made it to the above referenced accomplishments, but now feeling a little overwhelmed by school choices and not sure how to proceed. We homeschooled our eldest 3, back in the early 1990's after pulling them out of PS. They all graduated 15+ years ago. I'm rusty, to say the least, and a lot older. Just can't see these little ones attending PS. Yet overwhelmed at the thought of homeschooling them. But willing to give it my all. Could really use a support system, starting with some guidance. We already have the Preschool set for the neurotypical sibling. Just trying to figure out, for this fall, if SC A is basically the same as Preschool or what I should do?

        Thank you in advance for guidance. ~ Grace
        Stopping in to say hello and welcome. Level A is so much fun. Absolutely do not worry that you are "rusty". You'll do fabulous. I did Level C with my oldest child who had very few language skills and I had *never* taught before. It worked incredibly well. And I have taught Level A with my younger children. So put your mind at ease. This will be fun! Lots of songs and stories and paints. Just roll with it.

        My biggest reason for posting? To say, "Thank you". I have four children and my youngest is nine months old. I cannot imagine -- cannot IMAGINE -- anyone shaking them or any other sweet little baby, no matter how colicky. It is beyond horrific for me to even imagine. Thank you so much for adopting these precious children and giving them a loving home. None of us are perfect, but our love works perfection in little hearts when we give it freely. God bless you and your family.

        ~Anita
        Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
        Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
        Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
        Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

        “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
        ~Pope St John Paul II

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