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Cursive

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    Cursive

    We are stuck on A. He can write an A by itself beautifully. But getting them connected is frustrating both of us. We have tried erasing lines of A's from the white board, after the second one, he is going around the circle in the wrong direction. We've tried playdough, but that usually gets him mad before we even get to the letter, because he still can't make a snake effectively. (I have him just playing with play dough for thirty minutes or so a day to work on that.) We have tried wikki-sticks, and he has trouble there, as well. He can make a single A decently well, but can't connect them properly. I have tried making a line of A's step by step with the wikki sticks and he just can't quite get it. I am not sure if it is the fine motor skills lacking or the comprehension of the connecting with the wikki sticks.

    What am I missing? Maybe I need to take it to even bigger motor skills? A line of A's on the sidewalk to walk along maybe?
    Miah - married to Warcabbage, 3 boys, BS in social work, AS in Electrical Engineering Technology

    Evulcarrot - 18, freshman in college, Medical Technology , mild autism
    Battlebroccoli - 17, lives with grandma, attends a special high school program part time
    Doomsprout - 10, highly verbal moderate autism, anxiety, motor delays, sensory processing issues - SC 4 with R&S 4

    #2
    Re: Cursive

    Why not write a c next? It would force him to climb to the correct beginning position and then come back down.

    After he writes ac, writing two a's in a row may be easier because he'll have the strokes understood.

    My kids really struggled with getting to the correct starting point in the next letter too.
    Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

    DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
    DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
    DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

    We've completed:
    Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
    Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Cursive

      Another option you have is to make your own practice worksheets using the Start Write CD. It allows you to add arrows to the letters reminding the pathway to go!

      Michelle T

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Cursive

        Have you tried vertical writing? Sometimes that is easier to "see."

        Hand-over-hand might also help for motor memory.

        And Start Write might be worth the investment. You can enlarge the font quite a bit. This might help.

        Whenever he "gets" it, you might also decrease the daily time on the task. Have him connect the two letters and stop when he succeeds. Then move to something else.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Cursive

          Thanks for the ideas. I will definitely try having him write AC. I have the Start Write software, but he has never gelled well with arrows. Although I haven't tried them since he has done Vision Therapy. Maybe he didn't gel with them, because he couldn't see them well? I hadn't thought of that until just now. I'll try some tomorrow.

          I am so excited about this. We just finished giving his room a full makeover! All the school stuff is in there now! He has floor space! And importantly, we finally have a white board on the wall, so we can get him writing vertically. I think that was the last thing on the list of suggested items for SC2 that I was missing.


          Off-topic, but I'm really proud of myself on this room makeover. I hung all the first grade art posters up high on two walls, the alphabet chart is close to his desk. We even found a little stair stepper type exercise machine at the local thrift shop for $3. The electronics in it are broken, but the mechanics work fine. He has room for his cuddle swing to actually move, a block corner that isn't blocked from easy access. We've even got a corner for a crash pad, though that's still a bit of a work in progress. He often needs a lot of that big input to settle down. We put tape lines on the floor to help with our new PT goals. I have a comfy chair to sit on, so I'll actually stay in there (LOL). Got his knickknack shelf and wardrobe straightened, and some of his decorations up on the wall that I've been putting off for way too long, and his activity (puzzles, games, manipulatives, etc.) shelf is all attractive and uncluttered. His room was once a carport that the previous owner boxed in. They sectioned off an area (no door) that isn't really wide enough to be a walk-in closet, it's only wide enough for one curtain rod to fit, but his twin bed slides in there just perfect. I know that sounds kind of weird, but it has worked wonders on his anxiety to be boxed in like that. We put Christmas lights on the wall and have them hooked to a thing that lets him turn them on and off with a remote control. We'll see how long I manage to stay on top of everything. Keeping rid of clutter is one of my biggest challenges in life.
          Miah - married to Warcabbage, 3 boys, BS in social work, AS in Electrical Engineering Technology

          Evulcarrot - 18, freshman in college, Medical Technology , mild autism
          Battlebroccoli - 17, lives with grandma, attends a special high school program part time
          Doomsprout - 10, highly verbal moderate autism, anxiety, motor delays, sensory processing issues - SC 4 with R&S 4

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Cursive

            Outstanding! Share photos, if you have time.

            With Startwrite, you might play with font size, if he continues to find the arrows unhelpful. Make two huge connecting letters with a start dot and another target dot for connecting?

            Then combine this practice with the vertical writing. Then maybe also model an index finger in a tray of sand or cornmeal, and he imitates.

            It sounds like the manipulation of objects (Wikki sticks, playdough) gets in his way. You might save these for a theraplay time without tying it to cursive instruction.


            Congratulations on setting up his room. Inspiring. I love the image of art posters displayed in his own bedroom: less clutter, more art!

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Cursive

              It took me a while to get to this, because I made this whole post a couple days ago, and then hit post and it deleted it all. So frustration avoided it for a couple of days.

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Name:	Whiteboard, toys, art.jpg
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ID:	103986 This is our new whiteboard. We made it with this super thin plywood, and a 3x4 white board glued on. We already had the paint, screws, and the lip for the markers is an old piece of wall trim cut to size. It cost only about $25 from Lowe's, and we have half the piece of plywood left for another project. Some of the posters are above it, and the crashpad can be seen on the edge.

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ID:	103987 This is the block area. We have a partial set of attribute blocks (some pieces lost since my 17 year old was 3!), and some tree limb blocks. The Minecraft blocks I made for his birthday party two years ago. We used 75 9" boxes from Staples. The Minecraft specific patterns were printed off and glued on. They have held up really well, and are good for big constructions. The pile of pillows will be a crashpad once I get a cover to stuff the items into.

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ID:	103988 More art posters, mini trampoline, exercise machine, cuddle swing, tape lines on the floor, unfinished tile work (I swear it is getting finished this spring.), activity shelf, the door with the ABC chart goes to the laundry room.

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ID:	103989 milk crate of plastic dinos and dragons, black shelf of random toys, cardboard boxes of Super Hero Squaddies (cute little action figures that are highly collectible), coffee can of army men, and his mice. He wanted rats. They are more fun, but they are a lot more difficult and more responsibility. They have to be interacted with and kept entertained, and require a much bigger cage set up. He's learning the basics of physical rodent care with the mice who are happiest when no one interacts with them outside looking and cage cleaning (and honestly they aren't too fond of the cage cleaning either).

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Name:	Bed closet.jpg
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ID:	103990 Here is bed in the closet. We have Christmas lights on the wall, attached to a remote control. He likes his stuffed animals a lot. Not in the picture at the foot of the bed, under the shelf and under the foot of his bed are his tubs of water beads, moon sand, light box, and tub of PE equipment like weights, dancing ribbons, stretch bands, etc. He has a light show device that projects lights on the ceiling and walls, also on a remote control. He uses it and his whole bed area as a calm down zone sometimes. He has headphones and an mp3 player that is filled with white noise and string music for calming as well.


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ID:	103991 School zone. My comfy chair, his desk and chair (the ball in another picture is supposed to be his chair, as recommended by his PT, but seems to have gotten a hole in it the first day--Of COURSE). The Memoria books are in the shelves between the desk and comfy chair. On top of that shelf are phonics readers and some manipulatives in the basket and a stack of practice paper. He has his art supplies, pencil boxes, a tiny chalkboard, and handheld marker board in the desk shelves. We got that desk for $2 way back when my older kids started homeschooling. The local school district was remodeling all their furniture for the silly 'group' table thing that works so well with kids that need to focus. The bookshelf. Which still needs to be straightened. It was organized into science shelf, history shelf, etc, but took a hit while we were cleaning the room. I have a thing for books. This one is overflowing, and I have about five more scattered through the house also overflowing with plans to build a couple more (that will be instantly overflowing if I know me!) His bed is directly across from the bookshelf. He has a couple of trays of pansies on the desk in this shot. We are going to plant them in the little garden outside that giant window in front of his desk. He absolutely loves gardening.


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ID:	103992 His wardrobe. My dad made it when the Sprout was 5. It's small so he could be independent with clothes put away. He's going to outgrow it in another couple of years. Some knickknacks and keepsakes. The Minion banner I made for his last birthday. Minecraft paintings, Tesla and Einstein dolls. He bought those himself at the science museum!


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Name:	Activity Corner (2).jpg
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ID:	103993 I've retaken this photo several times. It refuses to not be fuzzy. A better shot of his activity shelf. Puzzles and Legos on the top shelf. letter and phonics manipulatives, Wikkistix, and a visual motor activity basket on the second shelf, fine motor activities, and math manipulatives on the third shelf, and games on the bottom. The Michelangelo painting on the ceiling. The oldest thought it had to be there. We put up a screen door on his room months ago, back when the dog lived with us. She was always on the Sprout's bed. It keeps the cats from killing his mice, too. We didn't want to block it off entirely with a solid door, and the screen door has worked out surprisingly well. The cats haven't climbed on it, and we can hear him play in there.

              Just barely visible on the other side of the screen door, we have an oil change drip pan 2x4 hanging on the backside of the kitchen bar. It has Minecraft magnets on it. That was a shockingly cheap project. The drip pan was only about $10. It has one small section of embossed letters, but otherwise makes a huge magnet board right there where kids can play by the kitchen. It would work great for a PECS magnet board if that sort of thing was needed.
              Miah - married to Warcabbage, 3 boys, BS in social work, AS in Electrical Engineering Technology

              Evulcarrot - 18, freshman in college, Medical Technology , mild autism
              Battlebroccoli - 17, lives with grandma, attends a special high school program part time
              Doomsprout - 10, highly verbal moderate autism, anxiety, motor delays, sensory processing issues - SC 4 with R&S 4

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Cursive

                Thanks, Miah! Your Sprout is all set.

                Pansies growing, artwork visible, science museum dolls ready to inspire, a comfy chair... and a mom who loves him.

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