Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

Using Wind in the Willows to teach figurative language?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Using Wind in the Willows to teach figurative language?

    Title says it all! How do I go about using the book and literature guide to teach figurative language to my son? He is very literal and I think he will need extra support
    and review but I'm not sure how to go about this. We started the book earlier this year but had to put it away because he didnt quite get the whole talking animals thing. Help!

    #2
    Re: Using Wind in the Willows to teach figurative language?

    Originally posted by Nothing new under the sun View Post
    Title says it all! How do I go about using the book and literature guide to teach figurative language to my son? He is very literal and I think he will need extra support
    and review but I'm not sure how to go about this. We started the book earlier this year but had to put it away because he didnt quite get the whole talking animals thing. Help!
    Hmmm... I'll take a stab at this one.

    With my own children, we emphasize the difference between real and pretend. Every time I read them a story, we jokingly ask questions about the story. For example, Miss Twiggley's Tree has a main character that lives with bears and has a dog who does her grocery shopping. They all share a treehouse on the edge of town. "Do bears read the newspaper? NO! Do dogs wear raincoats? NO! Do they play Chinese checkers? NO! It's just a silly story!" And we all laugh. But then I ask, "Wouldn't it be exciting if they did? What do you think they would read about? What would their favorite color raincoat be? Who would win?"

    If this doesn't work, assign a "person" to each animal character. If he doesn't "get" talking animals, ask him to think about what kind of person Toad would be if he weren't a frog. A middle-aged man? With balding hair? Does he have a deep voice or a shrill one? What kind of food does he like when he bothers to eat? Is he a messy houseguest? And is he a silly and frustrating person to be friends with? Whatever characteristics the author is trying to convey by making the protagonist an animal, try to bring that out in your discussion.

    Barring that.... ☺ Cheryl can help you!
    Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
    Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
    Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
    Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

    “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
    ~Pope St John Paul II

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Using Wind in the Willows to teach figurative language?

      Anita,

      I love this! I want to do school with your kids!

      Tanya

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Using Wind in the Willows to teach figurative language?

        A few ideas:

        Talking animals
        I love Anita's suggestion of thinking of actual people in their lives. You could introduce the idea with a familiar book, such as Frog & Toad. "Do you know any men like this?" (Perhaps retired neighbors who talk in their yards on summer days?) "Which one is more like Frog? Which is more like Toad?" Be sure not to make fun of people, but just draw comparisons. Or reference Winnie-the-Pooh. My kids have decided that one of their grandmas is very much like Rabbit, Dad is Owl, Michael's tendency toward unwarranted sullenness is like Eeyore. (Ironically, this comparison is not insulting, but just makes him smile.) Michelle fancies herself as a cross between Piglet and Tigger.


        Figurative language
        I would teach this for a few days, before you begin the actual book. Then when he encounters figurative language in the story, he will know what is happening. Just teach each a few key terms: metaphor, personification, hyperbole, symbolism. Make a few review cards with examples. Review the terms and ideas very briefly before each lesson.


        Teach with idioms
        This will be a great time to teach idioms. Through idioms, you can teach the terms Figurative and Literal as part of your pre-reading instruction. Give him two cards, one Figurative, the other Literal. Have him hold up the correct card for each.

        -"I'm getting ready to have a surprise party for Dad. Don't spill the beans!" Figurative or Literal? (He holds up a card.) Then discuss. What does "spill the beans" mean here?
        -"I'm going to ask you to carry this bowl of beans across the floor. Don't spill the beans!" Figurative or Literal? What does "spill the beans" mean here?

        -"That bird is nocturnal. He is a night owl." Figurative or Literal? What does "night owl" mean here?
        -"Dad likes to stay up late. He is a night owl." Figurative or Literal? What does "night owl" mean here? Is Dad really a bird? Like Anita, we have great success with silliness.

        If you need material, borrow a book from the library, like this.


        Wind in the Willows
        You might want to take a highlighter to the figurative language examples in the Student Guide. Then talk about comparison, as with the characters in Frog & Toad. Often with figurative language, things are being compared to other things.

        For example, on page 4 of the sample on MP's website, you find figurative language:
        Spring was moving in the air ....
        Soft breezes caressed ....
        The "insatiable sea" -- Is the sea really hungry? Does the sea have a stomach? What do you think the sea is being compared to?

        Or on page 6 - the river
        Use that terminology to ask, "What is the author comparing the river to?"


        Just a start
        Realize up front that your literal child will not suddenly become an expert in figurative language. However, you can use this as a good way to open his ears (figuratively speaking ) to this new use of words. He may even begin noticing other examples in everyday life.


        Fun question --

        Cheryl

        Comment

        Working...
        X