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ADHD & Mood

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    ADHD & Mood

    I'm hoping some of you ladies can share some advice/ been there done that sympathy with me. Anderson has ADHD. He takes ritalin. It helps him focus and is wonderful in that aspect, but it causes (or at least aggravates) decreased appetite, wild mood swings before onset and after the medication has worn off, headaches, and stomach aches. He hardly eats breakfast (I have to fight tooth and nail to get him to eat). Then at 3:00pm or so starts scarfing down anything he can get his hands on. Most foods have little nutritional value.

    Our biggest problem right now is the mood swings and meltdowns. They are constant - daily, multiple times a day, shouting, food stamping, yelling at siblings, etc. It really does seem like he has lost control. Afterwards he hates that he has done it, and he says that he feels out of control. It is so heartbreaking for him.

    A few things I have in mind are:
    [LIST][*]I want to start a diet overhaul in out house. Less empty carbs, more good protein, fruits, veggies, etc. Kitchen closed outside of regular meals and snacks (regular meals being breakfast, late afternoon lunch, dinner, for Anderson to work around his medication effects). None of my children are going to be happy with this, but that's okay. The only foods my daughter eats are pancakes, macaroni & cheese, string cheese, bananas, vanilla yogurt, vanilla ice cream, goldfish, applesauce and fruit snacks. Anderson eats just about all meats (as long as it isn't sauced or in a stew, apples, string cheese, saltine crackers, sometimes scrambled egg. We cannot go on like this!
    • daily exercise of some kind - likely walking
    • fast from electronics for at least two weeks
    • simple behavior chart like Anita described
    • regular daily routine, so he knows what to expect


    I would love to hear other ideas anyone has or stories of similar experiences/troubles. I'm also very interested in non-medicine interventions that people have used to supplement or replace medication. I'm not ready to stop the stimulants yet as it is so helpful with his focus, but I'd like to learn as much as I can about things I can do to help.

    Thanks so much!
    Susan

    2018-2019
    A (10) - Barton, R&S math 3, SC 3
    C (9) - Barton, R&S math 2, SC 3
    G (5) - Simply Classical C

    #2
    Re: ADHD & Mood

    Originally posted by sfhargett View Post
    I'm hoping some of you ladies can share some advice/ been there done that sympathy with me. Anderson has ADHD. He takes ritalin. It helps him focus and is wonderful in that aspect, but it causes (or at least aggravates) decreased appetite, wild mood swings before onset and after the medication has worn off, headaches, and stomach aches. He hardly eats breakfast (I have to fight tooth and nail to get him to eat). Then at 3:00pm or so starts scarfing down anything he can get his hands on. Most foods have little nutritional value.

    Our biggest problem right now is the mood swings and meltdowns. They are constant - daily, multiple times a day, shouting, food stamping, yelling at siblings, etc. It really does seem like he has lost control. Afterwards he hates that he has done it, and he says that he feels out of control. It is so heartbreaking for him.

    A few things I have in mind are:
    [LIST][*]I want to start a diet overhaul in out house. Less empty carbs, more good protein, fruits, veggies, etc. Kitchen closed outside of regular meals and snacks (regular meals being breakfast, late afternoon lunch, dinner, for Anderson to work around his medication effects). None of my children are going to be happy with this, but that's okay. The only foods my daughter eats are pancakes, macaroni & cheese, string cheese, bananas, vanilla yogurt, vanilla ice cream, goldfish, applesauce and fruit snacks. Anderson eats just about all meats (as long as it isn't sauced or in a stew, apples, string cheese, saltine crackers, sometimes scrambled egg. We cannot go on like this!
    • daily exercise of some kind - likely walking
    • fast from electronics for at least two weeks
    • simple behavior chart like Anita described
    • regular daily routine, so he knows what to expect


    I would love to hear other ideas anyone has or stories of similar experiences/troubles. I'm also very interested in non-medicine interventions that people have used to supplement or replace medication. I'm not ready to stop the stimulants yet as it is so helpful with his focus, but I'd like to learn as much as I can about things I can do to help.

    Thanks so much!
    My husband was diagnosed with ADD as an adult. We were blessed to have a doctor that did actual computer focus testing rather than go off of descriptions of symptoms. When they put him on Ritalin at 23, they said he responded to it the way they would expect a child to respond. He has it that bad. Anyways, he only eats breakfast if I remind him and even that is a new occurrence (he's now in his late 30's so that may have something to do with the change). When the Ritalin wears off (only 4 hours after he takes it) he gets tired, moody, etc. He has a hard time remembering to take that mid-day dose because he gets caught up in work -- we own our own business so he works from home. When he forgets that dose, it definitely makes for rough afternoons. When that dose wears off, it's usually just after work and he is again very tired and worn out.

    We have at least 4 children who show similar symptoms to my husband's. For various, serious reasons we don't have them on medication. Here is how we try to keep things in check; if your son is on medication, these things would help reinforce it's benefits:

    1) Routine. It's the same day in and day out. Not in a "by the clock" way, but in the sense that we do this, then that, then this. This does NOT mean that it flows smoothly or calmly (their ADD, moods and normal kid stuff see to that), but it gives a predictable framework. Whenever we go out of that framework, chaos ensues. Often it would be more accurate to say that "all h*** breaks loose".

    2) Whole foods. We try to keep an 80/20 on this so as not to cause MORE stress by stressing about everything we eat. There are some things we eat processed just because I don't have the time/energy to make it from scratch but we generally avoid: high fructose corn syrup, anything with more than 10g of sugar per serving and artificial flavors/colors. This means that cereal is usually corn flakes, plain cheerios or non-instant grits. Yogurt is plain, whole milk (our bodies NEED fat) with plain, frozen berries or a SMALL amount of honey or pure maple syrup. Candy only exists around the holidays and is restricted to one piece per day and not always on consecutive days. We allow baked goods, but we usually only have them when we've made them ourselves so that limits their consumption right there I AM more lenient when it comes to plain chocolate, especially if it's dark chocolate, as it can help moods/stress levels. This means one or two dark chocolate hershey kisses, but only once in a while. Birthdays don't follow this at all, but we do try to get a more "natural" ice cream or make it ourselves with the ice cream maker. We used to make the cakes at home too, but I haven't been able to keep that going lately.

    3) Fidgets. My husband just bought a fidget cube to see if it lived up to the hype before we spent $100 to get them for all the kids. It actually works and the kids were so intrigued by the concept that they decided to make their own, customized fidget cubes out of LEGO's! Each child was able to customize their cube for their particular needs. One child needs more tactile input so he put all different kinds of textured LEGO's on his cube. Another needs movement so he put switches and gears. And they came up with ALL of this on their own!

    The kids will also sit on pillows sometimes when working so they can "wiggle" without moving all over the place.

    4) Screens. We just went cold turkey on screens about two weeks ago and it does make a difference!

    5) Supplements. This is an area where I'm still experimenting. We found a homeopathic combo that helped my oldest years ago but it combines a TON of different remedies and herbs and that's just not a good idea for long term use. We just started everyone on 1000mg of high quality Fish Oil last week. They say it can take about 3 months to see results so I can't give feedback on it yet.


    We still have a lot to figure out here, but I hope some of this helps!
    Jennifer


    2018-2019
    DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
    DS-12 (6M)
    DS-10 (SC3)
    DD-8 (MP2)
    DD-6 (SC2)
    DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

    Comment


      #3
      Re: ADHD & Mood

      Oh! I forgot about the headaches! My 12 year old gets migraines from prolonged boredom, too much excitement or too many activities too many days in a row. I found out that treating them with acetaminophen or ibuprofen can actually make them come more frequently (that info was from a mainstream medical site). I've taught him to be aware of what causes them and I've become more keyed in to the early warning signs (bloodshot eyes, glazed look, trouble getting his words out, depressed/extremely frustrated mood, wanting to eat voraciously). When he and/or I see these things, we have him take deep breaths, take a break from reading, get some fresh air on the porch, talk about what's frustrating him, etc. This often stops it. If we don't catch it early enough then I have no choice but to give him pain meds otherwise the migraine will trigger nausea/vomiting.
      Jennifer


      2018-2019
      DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
      DS-12 (6M)
      DS-10 (SC3)
      DD-8 (MP2)
      DD-6 (SC2)
      DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

      Comment


        #4
        Re: ADHD & Mood

        Thanks Jennifer! That is helpful.

        Anderson's mood problems are most significant before his meds kick in and when they are wearing out. The doctor actually just prescribed another med to help with that (a non stimulant) but he hasn't been taking it long enough to see results.

        I know routine is important -- I've got to get better on it. I remember a line from Simply Classical where Cheryl said that it was the unstructured time where most of the misbehavior/problems occurred. Completely true. I have such a struggle with acedia.

        I'm sure eating better foods will be helpful. I'm planning on cutting out artificial flavors and colors, trying to get rid of preservatives, etc, fresh foods, more whole grains. Only 1 snack food a day (like goldfish, crackers, etc - the stuff that adds nothing nutritionally). And yes to whole milk products, we were already doing whole milk, but we're switching to whole milk yogurt too.

        I like that fidget cube! I might get one. We have a couple of sensory toys that I should bring out more. He has a wiggle pillow thing for sitting at the school table and it really does seem to help him. He chooses to use it.

        We did two weeks without screens months ago and it was wonderful. So I have faith it will be good again.

        I've heard about fish oil, but there are so many types I haven't started any. We certainly don't get enough DHA/EPA in our diet. Do you mind sharing what type you are using?

        As far as headaches, it can be so difficult for him to communicate. His head hurting can mean he has a headache, it can also mean that his head/emotions feel out of control, or that he's having trouble focusing.
        Susan

        2018-2019
        A (10) - Barton, R&S math 3, SC 3
        C (9) - Barton, R&S math 2, SC 3
        G (5) - Simply Classical C

        Comment


          #5
          Re: ADHD & Mood

          It sounds like you're on the right track! For the fish oil, we use this one. The site says the capsules can be chewed, but we haven't tried it.

          What are your biggest challenges when it comes to a routine?
          Jennifer


          2018-2019
          DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
          DS-12 (6M)
          DS-10 (SC3)
          DD-8 (MP2)
          DD-6 (SC2)
          DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

          Comment


            #6
            Re: ADHD & Mood

            I can't speak to the ADD/Meds things, but I hear this is every common (about the 3pm crash/so hungry). If it is pretty consistent, can you plan to head him off, and plan a late lunch/snack for him at 2:30/2:45, ensuring, for now, that whatever you are doing, the boy is eating by 2:45 (not thinking about it then, but actually eating then?).

            The thing I wanted to comment on is habit building. I would pick one thing and start there. You can't climb a mountain in 1 day. You can try, but you will either not reach the mountain and feel defeated or reach the top, but be unable to come down, or do it again. I have tried for many years now to set my "this is how things are going to go" and wake up on Monday and enforce these new, many changes. A trip to the grocery store will have occurred ahead of time, menu plans made, but in the end, I don't follow through. A monkey wrench is thrown almost every time and I feel defeated before even getting very far. A refrigerator full of food that doesn't get eaten. I have recently been encouraged by several blogs and postings that I thought I would share though. You need to start small and make only 1 change at a time. You can start with snacks, if you want - only offer cheese, fruit, veggies, yogurt, etc. Once this habit feels routine, make another change....keep going.

            The blog I read recently shared that she was the same as all of us, trying to make changes but never continuing. She had some goals wake up earlier, learn a new language, read, and I can't remember the other things. The first thing she did was set a goal of reading ONE page a night, ONE page! She often didn't have the energy to pick up the book, but she knew she only had to read 1 page, so she did it. She often read more than one page though. After this habit was built, she moved onto the language. She found some french app! HA! She said of 5 minutes every day while she sat and had her coffee, she listened to this app. At the end of the year she took some test and placed well- 5 min a day, every day was all she did! Anyway, as you can see, small, achievable changes make great progress!!!

            I'm currently working through "Trim Healthy Mama". it's the first "plan" where they actually say in the book, don't change everything overnight! They suggest starting with breakfast. so, that is what I am doing! I've actually been able to do more, but my goal is only breakfast right now! So, it's achievable!! In the meantime, I'm learning what the plan means and how to make it work for me!

            Lastly, if you do not own an instantPOT, read this and head to amazon and order one! :-) I now have two, after getting my first one in October. I use it for so many other things - my number 1 thing is YOGURT! It really is THAT good! My husband and I went on our honeymoon to Paris! We hardly ate at restaurants, but ate a bakeries, etc (meat, cheese, bread, etc). We went to "grocery" store for breakfast type foods and I have yet to find the yogurt like we ate there, until I made it myself!!! I made the berry compost (fruit on the bottom) and oh, just like Paris (probably less sugar too!). Yesterday I made tomato bisque soup and today I made shredded chicken. I put it in the InstanPOT (frozen breasts!) and 45 minutes later, I had cooked chicken, ready to shred!. We actually had to go somewhere before it was done, so I came home to it done! :-) I made a chicken wrap for lunch! Yum!
            Christine

            (2018-2019)
            DD1 8/23/09 - SC4
            DS2 9/1/11 - SC2
            DD3 2/9/13 - MPK

            Previous Years
            DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3)
            DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK)
            DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others!)

            Comment


              #7
              Re: ADHD & Mood

              Originally posted by howiecram View Post
              Anyway, as you can see, small, achievable changes make great progress!!!
              I just wrote in my planner last night: START WITH ONE THING!
              Jennifer


              2018-2019
              DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
              DS-12 (6M)
              DS-10 (SC3)
              DD-8 (MP2)
              DD-6 (SC2)
              DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

              Comment


                #8
                Re: ADHD & Mood

                Originally posted by sfhargett View Post
                I'm hoping some of you ladies can share some advice/ been there done that sympathy with me. Anderson has ADHD. He takes ritalin. It helps him focus and is wonderful in that aspect, but it causes (or at least aggravates) decreased appetite, wild mood swings before onset and after the medication has worn off, headaches, and stomach aches. He hardly eats breakfast (I have to fight tooth and nail to get him to eat). Then at 3:00pm or so starts scarfing down anything he can get his hands on. Most foods have little nutritional value.

                Our biggest problem right now is the mood swings and meltdowns. They are constant - daily, multiple times a day, shouting, food stamping, yelling at siblings, etc. It really does seem like he has lost control. Afterwards he hates that he has done it, and he says that he feels out of control. It is so heartbreaking for him.

                A few things I have in mind are:
                [LIST][*]I want to start a diet overhaul in out house. Less empty carbs, more good protein, fruits, veggies, etc. Kitchen closed outside of regular meals and snacks (regular meals being breakfast, late afternoon lunch, dinner, for Anderson to work around his medication effects). None of my children are going to be happy with this, but that's okay. The only foods my daughter eats are pancakes, macaroni & cheese, string cheese, bananas, vanilla yogurt, vanilla ice cream, goldfish, applesauce and fruit snacks. Anderson eats just about all meats (as long as it isn't sauced or in a stew, apples, string cheese, saltine crackers, sometimes scrambled egg. We cannot go on like this!
                • daily exercise of some kind - likely walking
                • fast from electronics for at least two weeks
                • simple behavior chart like Anita described
                • regular daily routine, so he knows what to expect


                I would love to hear other ideas anyone has or stories of similar experiences/troubles. I'm also very interested in non-medicine interventions that people have used to supplement or replace medication. I'm not ready to stop the stimulants yet as it is so helpful with his focus, but I'd like to learn as much as I can about things I can do to help.

                Thanks so much!
                Weighing in quickly here (you've already gotten some good advice):

                1) routine -- ABSOLUTELY. You do not have to schedule everything to death, but do have a predictable routine to your day, including exercise of your choice AND quiet time to decompress
                2) reduce screens -- another fantastic idea. Cancel your cable; remove apps from tablets; put a fence around viewing habits (only one movie per day, for example, after all chores, schoolwork and exercises are done)
                3) clean eating -- the basic rule here is "if it doesn't grow out of the ground or have a mama, don't eat it". Goldfish would not qualify as clean eating, for example. But cheese does. So does wheat, but as close to its natural form as possible. Eat all foods as close to their natural state as you can get. Recipes typically have around five ingredients (i.e. Dinner could be a palm-sized steak cooked in two teaspoons of olive oil with salt and pepper and Worcestershire sauce with a salted, roasted sweet potato and a teaspoon of maple syrup) Breads are fine, but limit them and make them full of whole grains (Dave's Killer Bread -- thin version -- is quite good toasted with a schmear of butter). Big agreeement with using butter and whole milk. No reduced fat cheeses or yogurts either. But eat them in moderation. Your plate should be primarily fruits and veg with a small helping of protein and grain. Nothing fancy. My grocery list always includes apples, bananas, pears, oranges, grapes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, mushrooms, onions, bell peppers, carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers and lettuce. Don't overthink it. Just keep the good food on hand instead of bad. If you're hungry, you have your pick. And just drink water, coffee or tea. Sugar is fine in small amounts (I'm drinking my afternoon cup right now). Which brings me to...
                4) scheduled eating -- again, not rocket science. Just eat breakfast at about the same time every day (make sure you have a good balance of fats, carbs and protein -- a small bowl of oatmeal, a poached egg and a cup of coffee keep me going a pretty long while), a small mid morning snack (grapes and a slice of sharp cheddar cheese with water); a simple lunch; an afternoon snack (I prefer Irish black tea and a slice of the aforementioned toast -- YUM); plus a simple dinner. This keeps energy levels stable and your blood sugar from crashing.
                If you can't get your son to eat first thing in the morning, make him a smoothie with peanut butter, banana and yogurt.
                5) choose an exercise you will actually do -- if you like walking, walk. But if you hate jogging, don't resolve to start. You'll never do it.
                6) keep the behavior chart simple
                7) keep communication open -- forgive and seek forgiveness. Fill your house with grace. Read books together that promote the character qualities that are important to you. Pray together. Talk and snuggle (as much as you can with a 9 yo!) before bed every night. Stay in touch. Stay involved.
                8) pray for him

                Good luck!
                Last edited by Anita; 01-14-2017, 03:11 PM.
                Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
                Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
                Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
                Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

                “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
                ~Pope St John Paul II

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: ADHD & Mood

                  And be sure to tell the prescribing physician about the mood swings. If stimulants trigger mood swings, this can (should) alert the physician.

                  We experienced this with my son and needed to switch to a different class of medications for his ADHD.

                  If the physician is good, he/she will also know about researched supplements for optimal brain health in children with ADHD. Then he/she can recommend supplements to coordinate with prescribed medical treatment. When all of this is in good balance, then all of your efforts toward diet, structure, and habit-building will be even more effective.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: ADHD & Mood

                    I haven't read though all the replies so forgive me if I am repeating.

                    My now 12 yro son was clinically diagnosed by computer testing and other methods several years ago. He has primary inattentive type (no real hyperactivity), tested gifted but with slower processing speed. We tried various non-medication methods for about a year, and then with the urging of his doctor, finally gave it a try. It lasted a month before we pulled him off of it. Mostly for the reasons you described and showing depression (not his character). I am by no means suggesting no-meds for your son..every child is different..I know Children who thrive with it..but we just couldn't make it work.

                    So here is what we do:
                    1) keeping routine is key for his success. He knows what to expect. When our routine is derailed, he gets moody.
                    2) very clean diet..we do have gluten allergies in our home so that must be avoided. And my Middle daughter has chronic Lyme disease with several co-infections..so we also have to abstain from dairy and very minimal sugar. We have very limited grains..just quinoa and gf oats every once in while. Zero HFCS, food dyes-especially red 40!!, and preservatives. And organic as much as possible. It's not really as restrictive as one would think. I do cook every meal though. My kids usually help. Or I have pre-made some freezer meals. In the begginning it was tough but we have been at it for so many years it's just the norm. When 2 of my kids accidentally are given food dyes, they go nuts. My non- gluten allergic kids absolutely get "foggy" when they have had it.
                    3) essential oils diffused while working.
                    4) strict bedtime. Enough sleep is crucial. It's hard to be restrictive on my almost teen boy with bedtime, but he seriously can not function with out solid sleep.
                    5) my son also take a high quality multi vitamin with extra B12 and a fish oil in the morn and extra calcium, magnesium, and zinc at bed. I wouldnt suggest giving all that to your child unless you know he has a deficiency. Too much can cause mood issues too.
                    6) zero screens outside of his MPOA class and Quizlet for review. We have one tv in our house that only usually comes on during weekends, and zero gaming systems. I do know kids with adhd that can handle screen time well. My son and two of my others can not. It completely changes their mood. It's crucial for my husband and I to be good examples when it comes to this our we do get some resistance. This forum is my guilty pleasure
                    7) we've also rid our house of chemicals and fragrances with the exception to essential oils. Environmental toxin overload can play a role in mood and can also inhibit healing.
                    8) exercise is a must for my sons mental clarity. His brain is much more calm
                    If he is exercising regularly..especially in the winter months.

                    Please know that this is what works for US. And while it hasn't "cured" him, these things help tremendously.

                    Prayers from one adhd mama to another!
                    Last edited by Katie; 01-14-2017, 07:36 PM.
                    Katie

                    2018/2019 5th year with MP
                    DS 9th, DD 6th, DD 2nd: attending a classical prep school 3 days/week using mostly MP.
                    Twin DD's 6: home with me and loving MPK!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: ADHD & Mood

                      Originally posted by Anita View Post
                      7) keep communication open -- forgive and seek forgiveness. Fill your house with grace. Read books together that promote the character qualities that are important to you. Pray together. Talk and snuggle (as much as you can with a 9 yo!) before bed every night. Stay in touch. Stay involved.
                      8) pray for him

                      Good luck!
                      Yes!! This!!! Thank you for bringing this up. When I get frustrated with him, it's no good. I do ask for his forgiveness often. When I pray with him and talk to him and stress that what he has is a gift, it eases tension between us. I have to remind myself that he.can.not.help 80% of his struggles with attention. I say that because he is still an adolescent boy with 4 younger, often times, distracting sisters I pray that God always helps me acknowledge his accomplishments and not his struggles.
                      Katie

                      2018/2019 5th year with MP
                      DS 9th, DD 6th, DD 2nd: attending a classical prep school 3 days/week using mostly MP.
                      Twin DD's 6: home with me and loving MPK!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: ADHD & Mood

                        Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
                        What are your biggest challenges when it comes to a routine?
                        Honestly, getting going in the morning and fatigue in the afternoon. I'm planning on cutting myself off from my phone/computer during non-break time too to help with that. I planned on a long lunch to give myself a rest, but haven't been using it because we've been late getting going with our days.

                        Originally posted by howiecram View Post
                        If it is pretty consistent, can you plan to head him off, and plan a late lunch/snack for him at 2:30/2:45, ensuring, for now, that whatever you are doing, the boy is eating by 2:45 (not thinking about it then, but actually eating then?).

                        The thing I wanted to comment on is habit building. I would pick one thing and start there. You can't climb a mountain in 1 day. You can try, but you will either not reach the mountain and feel defeated or reach the top, but be unable to come down, or do it again.
                        Having food ready for him is a great idea. I'll prepare him a meal at lunch time and then reheat it for him right before the time he usually starts melting down.

                        That point on habit building is very true. I have a huge tendency to go whole hog on things and then fizzle. I'll start with building a predictable routine and better meals. There's no way I could get them to eat the type of meals I want them to eat right out the gate, so I'll start a bit smaller.

                        I do have an instant pot. I need to figure out how to do more things in it. Any websites you suggest for recipes?

                        Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
                        And be sure to tell the prescribing physician about the mood swings. If stimulants trigger mood swings, this can (should) alert the physician.

                        We experienced this with my son and needed to switch to a different class of medications for his ADHD.

                        If the physician is good, he/she will also know about researched supplements for optimal brain health in children with ADHD. Then he/she can recommend supplements to coordinate with prescribed medical treatment. When all of this is in good balance, then all of your efforts toward diet, structure, and habit-building will be even more effective.
                        Yes, he added a new medicine to help the transition on and off the meds, in hopes that would help the mood swings. We go back in 2 1/2 weeks, so I expect he'll make adjustments if it's not helping. He came highly recommended when we moved back to NC.

                        Originally posted by Katie View Post
                        4) strict bedtime. Enough sleep is crucial. It's hard to be restrictive on my almost teen boy with bedtime, but he seriously can not function with out solid sleep.
                        5) my son also take a high quality multi vitamin with extra B12 and a fish oil in the morn and extra calcium, magnesium, and zinc at bed. I wouldnt suggest giving all that to your child unless you know he has a deficiency. Too much can cause mood issues too.
                        6) zero screens outside of his MPOA class and Quizlet for review. We have one tv in our house that only usually comes on during weekends, and zero gaming systems. I do know kids with adhd that can handle screen time well. My son and two of my others can not. It completely changes their mood. It's crucial for my husband and I to be good examples when it comes to this our we do get some resistance. This forum is my guilty pleasure
                        7) we've also rid our house of chemicals and fragrances with the exception to essential oils. Environmental toxin overload can play a role in mood and can also inhibit healing.
                        8) exercise is a must for my sons mental clarity. His brain is much more calm
                        If he is exercising regularly..especially in the winter months.

                        Please know that this is what works for US. And while it hasn't "cured" him, these things help tremendously.

                        Prayers from one adhd mama to another!
                        We're decent at bedtime, but are often 1/2-1 hour late. We need to get better at this so that the kids get enough sleep and that my husband and I actually get enough time together.

                        He definitely is one of those kids who can't handle screen time well. He gets sucked in. Glazed over eyes, sluggish moving brain. I'm certain removing them will be a positive.

                        I'm going to work slowly but surely switching over to natural foods and cleansers. I'm dipping my feet in diffusing essential oils.

                        We had snow last weekend and we kept inside for 4 days or so. I bet this has contributed. I'm going to encourage him to play outside every afternoon and hopefully take walks together.

                        Originally posted by Anita View Post
                        Weighing in quickly here (you've already gotten some good advice):


                        7) keep communication open -- forgive and seek forgiveness. Fill your house with grace. Read books together that promote the character qualities that are important to you. Pray together. Talk and snuggle (as much as you can with a 9 yo!) before bed every night. Stay in touch. Stay involved.
                        8) pray for him

                        Good luck!
                        This is such good advice. My guy knows he struggles, it seems like someone is frustrated with him most of the time. He needs more encouragement and affirmation than correction. He is such a sweet, good kid at heart and many of his struggles are out of his control. He actually does let me snuggle though, so I need to take advantage of that for as long as possible.

                        A couple days ago he asked why his sister is farther along in reading even though he is old. Yikes. Took a deep breath. Told him that God makes everyone differently and gives everyone different gifts and weaknesses. He knew he had ADHD and apraxia of speech. But I hadn't told him about dyslexia/dysgraphia before. He handled it well, likely because I made a point to go over his strengths at the same time -- super kind and thoughtful, natural gift in mathematical thinking, ability to synthesize information and think deeply over it. I need to remember to compliment him outside of school time for behaving well/doing nice things.

                        Thanks everyone for posting, lots of food for thought!
                        Susan

                        2018-2019
                        A (10) - Barton, R&S math 3, SC 3
                        C (9) - Barton, R&S math 2, SC 3
                        G (5) - Simply Classical C

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: ADHD & Mood

                          Originally posted by sfhargett View Post

                          I do have an instant pot. I need to figure out how to do more things in it. Any websites you suggest for recipes?


                          I use "This old Gal". I also just google times on how long to cook stuff. I bought one pot in the fall, but I didn't use it that much. It did not have a yogurt maker though. I bought a yogurt one on black friday! I now have two and I use both, regularly! Soups, yogurt, sides are what I use it for the most. Also, shredded meat and pot roast. I still prefer to bake or grill most meat. The yogurt has been the most fascinating thing for me. It really is that good! You can't find the texture of the yogurt here in the US! It's time consuming, but most of it you are not doing anything. It is something that would make me not do it again, usually, except is is THAT good! :-) Also, I strain it for Greek yogurt and the whey protein has been used in so many things recently (anything that calls for liquid). I froze them in 4 tablespoons portions. . (1/4 cup) (obviously if anyone has dairy issues this isn't going to be a selling point!) There are so many protein powders on the market these days and all it is is WHEY PROTEIN! You can add it to smoothies too, upping the protein content. My son has sensory issues so eats very few cooked veggies. He will drink just about any smoothie I make for him though. He doesn't like the texture of any berry, but will drink them in a smoothie. (I'll add kale and spinach in my vitamin). Also a random thought not related to the instant pot, about my son: I try to capitalize on his growth spurts (the days where he eats all day) to introduce new foods. He must be hungry enough to try the new taste and texture! It doesn't always work and it is hard to plan around since you don't know when it will occur, but I have changed dinner plans! (oh wow, you have been eating all day, I guess we can save tacos for later in the week - tonight we'll have chicken and some veggie you have not had before!)
                          Christine

                          (2018-2019)
                          DD1 8/23/09 - SC4
                          DS2 9/1/11 - SC2
                          DD3 2/9/13 - MPK

                          Previous Years
                          DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3)
                          DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK)
                          DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others!)

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: ADHD & Mood

                            Originally posted by howiecram View Post
                            The yogurt has been the most fascinating thing for me. It really is that good! You can't find the texture of the yogurt here in the US! It's time consuming, but most of it you are not doing anything. It is something that would make me not do it again, usually, except is is THAT good! :-) Also, I strain it for Greek yogurt and the whey protein has been used in so many things recently (anything that calls for liquid). I froze them in 4 tablespoons portions. . (1/4 cup) (obviously if anyone has dairy issues this isn't going to be a selling point!) There are so many protein powders on the market these days and all it is is WHEY PROTEIN! You can add it to smoothies too, upping the protein content.
                            ...
                            Also a random thought not related to the instant pot, about my son: I try to capitalize on his growth spurts (the days where he eats all day) to introduce new foods. He must be hungry enough to try the new taste and texture! It doesn't always work and it is hard to plan around since you don't know when it will occur, but I have changed dinner plans!
                            I started making yogurt because my kids were bankrupting me with how much they ate. I figured out that a gallon of milk would make at least twice as much Greek yogurt as buying it outright (one gallon of milk is $3.50 and makes about two generous quarts of Greek yogurt; versus two quarts of storebought Greek yogurt at $14 total -- that's a no-brainer!). I now have TWO yogurt makers. I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE homemade yogurt. You are absolutely correct -- store bought doesn't even come close! Homemade yogurt is smooth, creamy and silky. Store bought is gelatinous, chalky and weird by comparison (even the premium whole milk brands are inferior to homemade). But you ARE left with a ton of whey. I use it to replace milk or water in oatmeal, pancakes, waffles, cornbread, muffins and anything else I can think up. It's versatile, awesome stuff.

                            One hint to anyone who wants to get more whole foods into their kids' diets: cut up several different kinds of fruits and put them in a bowl. When you serve meals, serve the fruit as well. Just leave it on the table for anyone to grab -- breakfast, lunch and dinner. Refill and replenish as needed. You will be shocked at how quickly and how often your kids go for it. Make healthy eating more convenient than eating junk food. Works like a charm.
                            Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
                            Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
                            Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
                            Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

                            “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
                            ~Pope St John Paul II

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: ADHD & Mood

                              Originally posted by Anita View Post
                              I started making yogurt because my kids were bankrupting me with how much they ate. I figured out that a gallon of milk would make at least twice as much Greek yogurt as buying it outright (one gallon of milk is $3.50 and makes about two generous quarts of Greek yogurt; versus two quarts of storebought Greek yogurt at $14 total -- that's a no-brainer!). I now have TWO yogurt makers. I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE homemade yogurt. You are absolutely correct -- store bought doesn't even come close! Homemade yogurt is smooth, creamy and silky. Store bought is gelatinous, chalky and weird by comparison (even the premium whole milk brands are inferior to homemade). But you ARE left with a ton of whey. I use it to replace milk or water in oatmeal, pancakes, waffles, cornbread, muffins and anything else I can think up. It's versatile, awesome stuff.

                              One hint to anyone who wants to get more whole foods into their kids' diets: cut up several different kinds of fruits and put them in a bowl. When you serve meals, serve the fruit as well. Just leave it on the table for anyone to grab -- breakfast, lunch and dinner. Refill and replenish as needed. You will be shocked at how quickly and how often your kids go for it. Make healthy eating more convenient than eating junk food. Works like a charm.
                              Okay, I may need to try that out next weekend. Since my surgery, I've been drinking protein shakes and the nutritionist says whey protein isolate is the most absorb able form.
                              Susan

                              2018-2019
                              A (10) - Barton, R&S math 3, SC 3
                              C (9) - Barton, R&S math 2, SC 3
                              G (5) - Simply Classical C

                              Comment

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