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Re-reading Phonics Readers

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    Re-reading Phonics Readers

    Those of you who have your children read the phonics readers (or other material) more than one time a day -- how do you schedule it? Back to back? Once in the morning and once in the afternoon? Once with the main lesson and once again as a fluency lesson? I'm trying to move my son quickly through the red readers and probably the stories in FSR C, but I think he could benefit from reading them more than once. I'd love to hear how you all have worked it.
    Susan

    2018-2019
    A (10) - Barton, R&S math 3, SC 3
    C (9) - Barton, R&S math 2, SC 3
    G (5) - Simply Classical C

    #2
    Re: Re-reading Phonics Readers

    Originally posted by sfhargett View Post
    Those of you who have your children read the phonics readers (or other material) more than one time a day -- how do you schedule it? Back to back? Once in the morning and once in the afternoon? Once with the main lesson and once again as a fluency lesson? I'm trying to move my son quickly through the red readers and probably the stories in FSR C, but I think he could benefit from reading them more than once. I'd love to hear how you all have worked it.
    We always read them two or three times, at least. We read them when they are assigned; read them as a review before reading the next assigned reader (a few days later); and then read them a third time on a light day where we don't have much to do. I just insert them in the lesson as a failsafe. Typically, by then, the children will start picking the books up on their own to read for pleasure (I leave them out and available on our school cart).

    Does that help? I wouldn't push too hard or too fast if this is your son's first exposure to FSRC, though. Take your time and do the lessons as assigned. They need to "cook" a bit in his noggin to really be effective
    Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
    Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
    Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
    Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

    “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
    ~Pope St John Paul II

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Re-reading Phonics Readers

      We were similar. I sort of "spiraled" the readers. We would do them as assigned, then I kept them off to the side. I would do like Anita and sometimes use it as a warm-up and sometimes she read them to Daddy at night time. I don't think we ever re-read one on the same day.
      Christine

      (2019/2020)
      DD1 8/23/09 - SC5/6
      DS2 9/1/11 - SC3,4, 5/6 combo
      DD3 2/9/13 -SC2 to start, MP1 second semester

      Previous Years
      DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4’
      DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2)
      DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK)

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Re-reading Phonics Readers

        Originally posted by sfhargett View Post
        Those of you who have your children read the phonics readers (or other material) more than one time a day -- how do you schedule it? Back to back? Once in the morning and once in the afternoon? Once with the main lesson and once again as a fluency lesson? I'm trying to move my son quickly through the red readers and probably the stories in FSR C, but I think he could benefit from reading them more than once. I'd love to hear how you all have worked it.
        While we're on it ---- anyone have tips for encouraging struggling readers to re-read the phonics readers WITHOUT wailing and gnashing of teeth.

        If I hear, "Mom, those are baby books!" one more time, I think I may scream.
        Plans for 2019-20

        DD1 - 24 - College Grad and rocking her own bakery business
        DD2 - 13 - 8A Louisville HLS Cottage School and MPOA
        DS3 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
        DS4 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
        DD5 - 7 - MP2, Louisville HLS Cottage School
        DS6 - 5 - MP K

        [url]www.thekennedyadventures.com/all-about-our-memoria-press-homeschool[/url]

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Re-reading Phonics Readers

          Originally posted by DiannaKennedy View Post
          While we're on it ---- anyone have tips for encouraging struggling readers to re-read the phonics readers WITHOUT wailing and gnashing of teeth.

          If I hear, "Mom, those are baby books!" one more time, I think I may scream.
          Bribery.

          Wait -- no...

          Threat of pain?
          Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
          Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
          Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
          Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

          “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
          ~Pope St John Paul II

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Re-reading Phonics Readers

            Ha. I use bribery for more than a few things. The big two kids wanted a new ipad game very badly. So I told them if they did their best at school all last week (our first week) then they could purchase the game with their own money. Success! Of course I do want to minimize brainless electronics so I can't do this every week. Bribery with food treats?

            So speaking of re-reading -- do you guys have your kids re-read the stories in the FSR books or ALS readers, or just the primary phonics. My son can read CVC and blend words easily but really struggles with fluency. He also fatigues really quickly. Were your kids pretty fluent before moving on the FSR D? And lastly, for the longer stories in FSR D/E does your child read the entire story or do you alternate sentences or paragraphs with the child?
            Susan

            2018-2019
            A (10) - Barton, R&S math 3, SC 3
            C (9) - Barton, R&S math 2, SC 3
            G (5) - Simply Classical C

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Re-reading Phonics Readers

              Originally posted by sfhargett View Post
              Ha. I use bribery for more than a few things. The big two kids wanted a new ipad game very badly. So I told them if they did their best at school all last week (our first week) then they could purchase the game with their own money. Success! Of course I do want to minimize brainless electronics so I can't do this every week. Bribery with food treats?

              So speaking of re-reading -- do you guys have your kids re-read the stories in the FSR books or ALS readers, or just the primary phonics? My son can read CVC and blend words easily but really struggles with fluency. He also fatigues really quickly. Were your kids pretty fluent before moving on the FSR D? And lastly, for the longer stories in FSR D/E does your child read the entire story or do you alternate sentences or paragraphs with the child?
              We have a chore/behavior chart at my house. Each child gains a star for completion of a desired action. 6 stars equals one piece of candy. Works great. So does cracking the proverbial whip and getting serious with them if they cop an attitude. There's very little voice-raising or handling involved. We're just very matter-of-fact: "If you do not do 'this', then 'that' happens. Do you understand?"
              They agree. But if they do not act:
              "You did not do 'this', so 'that' is now the consequence."
              Keep it simple. Be consistent. Follow through.
              "If you do not read your assignment right now, you will have to read it before dinner. Do you understand?"
              They agree, but then whine and grouse and decide to be difficult. I have other children to teach and other things to do (and it's not worth the near temptation of sin, honestly, to argue with my child) so we move on. But: Guess what we do before dinner? It gets done.

              Re-reading: depends on the day, their energy level and their mastery of the material. My daughter, I have to stop or she'll read an entire book by herself (she just keeps going and going in books like "Soft and White"). She moved slowly at first with FSRA, but then "cracked the code" on her own and started flying through all the readers. She's now reading a grade level ahead.

              My son, I have to practically drag in to reading anything. But the way I assisted him was by pre-reading, reading, and re-reading the red readers and any stories that he found difficult. We would take turns as well. Or I would repeat what he had just read so he could hear it modeled. He gained mastery and started enjoying the red readers precisely because he *could* read them. He was proud of himself (and rightly so) and enjoyed "showing off" what he could do. So building confidence and celebrating any gain, however small, is a great motivator for my struggling reader.

              A caveat: My son found FSRA, FSRB and even FSRC pretty easy. FSRD increases the difficulty quite a bit. The stories become longer and the vowels go from short to long. There are also vowel teams and consonant blends. We got it done, but it was a tougher hike than the level of the previous FSR lessons. The good news is that in SC2, the Moose Moments readers start back at the short vowel level. The stories are pretty long, but the CVC level is low. This (in my opinion) is a great confidence-builder. My son sees the length of the story and starts to complain. But then, when we actually read it, he starts to notice the simplicity of the words and he starts to relax a bit. The lesson plans also have you alternate pages with your student and follow the pre-read, read, re-read and review format for mastery ensurance.

              Does that help?
              Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
              Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
              Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
              Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

              “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
              ~Pope St John Paul II

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Re-reading Phonics Readers

                Originally posted by Anita View Post

                My son, I have to practically drag in to reading anything. But the way I assisted him was by pre-reading, reading, and re-reading the red readers and any stories that he found difficult. We would take turns as well. Or I would repeat what he had just read so he could hear it modeled. He gained mastery and started enjoying the red readers precisely because he *could* read them. He was proud of himself (and rightly so) and enjoyed "showing off" what he could do. So building confidence and celebrating any gain, however small, is a great motivator for my struggling reader.

                A caveat: My son found FSRA, FSRB and even FSRC pretty easy. FSRD increases the difficulty quite a bit. The stories become longer and the vowels go from short to long. There are also vowel teams and consonant blends. We got it done, but it was a tougher hike than the level of the previous FSR lessons. The good news is that in SC2, the Moose Moments readers start back at the short vowel level. The stories are pretty long, but the CVC level is low. This (in my opinion) is a great confidence-builder. My son sees the length of the story and starts to complain. But then, when we actually read it, he starts to notice the simplicity of the words and he starts to relax a bit. The lesson plans also have you alternate pages with your student and follow the pre-read, read, re-read and review format for mastery ensurance.

                Does that help?
                Yes this is helpful Anita. I can totally see how re-reading would lead to greater mastery which would in turn lead to actually enjoying the reading. Hoping that happens here.

                I've done FSR D with my daughter so I know how much the difficulty increases. It took her 6-8 weeks to get the long vowels. It was tough. So I expect it to be tough with my son. He's comfortable with digraphs and blends though so once we get through the magic e it should be much easier for him. I have to bring my mind around to not having mastery the first go round with each phonics skill. That's a switch from Barton.

                Last question -- did you complete the blue and green primary phonics readers before moving from SC 1 to SC 2? I'm a bit worried about those. But I probably should relax and just go with it.

                Thanks!
                Susan

                2018-2019
                A (10) - Barton, R&S math 3, SC 3
                C (9) - Barton, R&S math 2, SC 3
                G (5) - Simply Classical C

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Re-reading Phonics Readers

                  Originally posted by sfhargett View Post
                  Yes this is helpful Anita. I can totally see how re-reading would lead to greater mastery which would in turn lead to actually enjoying the reading. Hoping that happens here.

                  I've done FSR D with my daughter so I know how much the difficulty increases. It took her 6-8 weeks to get the long vowels. It was tough. So I expect it to be tough with my son. He's comfortable with digraphs and blends though so once we get through the magic e it should be much easier for him. I have to bring my mind around to not having mastery the first go round with each phonics skill. That's a switch from Barton.

                  Last question -- did you complete the blue and green primary phonics readers before moving from SC 1 to SC 2? I'm a bit worried about those. But I probably should relax and just go with it.

                  Thanks!
                  Happy to help

                  No, we did not complete all the blue and green readers before SC2, simply because they were not in the lesson plans. We read through a few of the blue readers as they appeared. And I think my Boy picked a few up out of curiosity, but he did not touch the green readers. Again, simply because they were not assigned in the main body of the lesson plans. (They might be in the 8-week review, but we did not complete that, we just jumped straight in from a hybrid of MPK/SC1 to SC2. Core Skills Phonics 1 was covered in the MPK work, so we completed it throughout the year instead of saving it for an eight-week review.)

                  It is my guess that Moose Moments and At The Farm do the job of the blue and green readers, but at a higher level. The blue and green readers are shorter, simpler, have an illustration per page and are highly controlled. So they are perfect for younger readers who are just starting out. The Moose Moments readers are longer and have fewer illustrations, but their phonetic complexity is relatively low. So they are more suitable for an older reader who still needs practice in the basics. This progression has worked great for my Struggling Reader. He instinctively understands, just by looking at the Moose Moments books, that they are for older, more advanced children. But he is only partly correct, which is the sneaky genius of including them in the Simply Classical, Level Two core.
                  Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
                  Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
                  Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
                  Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

                  “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
                  ~Pope St John Paul II

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Re-reading Phonics Readers

                    Originally posted by Anita View Post

                    A caveat: My son found FSRA, FSRB and even FSRC pretty easy. FSRD increases the difficulty quite a bit. The stories become longer and the vowels go from short to long. There are also vowel teams and consonant blends. We got it done, but it was a tougher hike than the level of the previous FSR lessons. The good news is that in SC2, the Moose Moments readers start back at the short vowel level. The stories are pretty long, but the CVC level is low. This (in my opinion) is a great confidence-builder. My son sees the length of the story and starts to complain. But then, when we actually read it, he starts to notice the simplicity of the words and he starts to relax a bit. The lesson plans also have you alternate pages with your student and follow the pre-read, read, re-read and review format for mastery ensurance.
                    Originally posted by Anita View Post
                    Happy to help


                    It is my guess that Moose Moments and At The Farm do the job of the blue and green readers, but at a higher level. The blue and green readers are shorter, simpler, have an illustration per page and are highly controlled. So they are perfect for younger readers who are just starting out. The Moose Moments readers are longer and have fewer illustrations, but their phonetic complexity is relatively low. So they are more suitable for an older reader who still needs practice in the basics. This progression has worked great for my Struggling Reader. He instinctively understands, just by looking at the Moose Moments books, that they are for older, more advanced children. But he is only partly correct, which is the sneaky genius of including them in the Simply Classical, Level Two core.
                    Hopefully it's ok to ask this on this thread, rather than starting a new one - I wanted to include Anita's comments about FSRD with my question.

                    My son is working through FSR very slowly, currently almost finished with Book C. (As an aside, I am using the old MP K plans. I already had them, and my daughter never used the SRA phonics book when she did K, so I just ordered new FSR workbooks). We have the ALS readers (Fun in the Sun, etc.), but not the Primary Phonics Readers. We already had a bunch of MCP phonetic readers so I didn' buy them - but I’m not opposed to getting them if you all think they add a lot of value. So I’m using the phonetic readers that I have, the ALS readers, and readings from the "Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading" that coincide with what he's doing in FSR. He's doing some MP1 in other subjects (math, enrichment), although he hasn't started cursive yet and I haven't even attempted spelling. At the beginning of this school year, I considered using SC2 with him but I didn't feel like he was quite ready; at the same time, I also he was beyond SC1 reading (in hindsight, probably not).

                    Until very recently, he was very slow in blending CVC words and would have to cover the first letter and sound out the ending, then add the first letter (i.e., for cat he would cover the c and say “at…cat”). He did this for almost every word, no matter how many times he had read it. I can tell that he still does this in his head sometimes, but his fluency with CVC word stories has improved greatly. Even though he HATES re-reading, it does help him. His confidence has improved and his frustration level has decreased. He still has trouble reading/spelling the common words in FSRC, so I bought the phonics flashcards and pulled out all of the common words he’s learned. I’m hoping that extra review with the cards will help.

                    My concern is this: I am afraid we are going to hit another wall with FSRD, mainly a wall of frustration for him. My suspicion is that vowel teams and consonant blends are going to be tough for him. We will just continue to plug along and, regardless of where we are in the spring, continue on with reading over the summer; however, I am also trying to look ahead to next school year (August, for us). Should I wait until we get through FSRE and then reassess? Would SC2 be a good fit for him then? Should I change anything sooner? I get a little confused by the SC levels, but I’m wondering if Moose Moments would be a good transition. My daughter did MP1 and I don't see my son being ready for Storytime Treasures any time soon.

                    Thanks!

                    Melanie
                    Melanie

                    2018-2019:
                    DS 12 - 7M, MPOA
                    DD 10 - 5M, Delectare
                    DS 8 - 3M

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Re-reading Phonics Readers

                      Originally posted by melm1022 View Post
                      Hopefully it's ok to ask this on this thread, rather than starting a new one - I wanted to include Anita's comments about FSRD with my question.

                      My son is working through FSR very slowly, currently almost finished with Book C. (As an aside, I am using the old MP K plans. I already had them, and my daughter never used the SRA phonics book when she did K, so I just ordered new FSR workbooks). We have the ALS readers (Fun in the Sun, etc.), but not the Primary Phonics Readers. We already had a bunch of MCP phonetic readers so I didn' buy them - but I’m not opposed to getting them if you all think they add a lot of value. So I’m using the phonetic readers that I have, the ALS readers, and readings from the "Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading" that coincide with what he's doing in FSR. He's doing some MP1 in other subjects (math, enrichment), although he hasn't started cursive yet and I haven't even attempted spelling. At the beginning of this school year, I considered using SC2 with him but I didn't feel like he was quite ready; at the same time, I also he was beyond SC1 reading (in hindsight, probably not).

                      Until very recently, he was very slow in blending CVC words and would have to cover the first letter and sound out the ending, then add the first letter (i.e., for cat he would cover the c and say “at…cat”). He did this for almost every word, no matter how many times he had read it. I can tell that he still does this in his head sometimes, but his fluency with CVC word stories has improved greatly. Even though he HATES re-reading, it does help him. His confidence has improved and his frustration level has decreased. He still has trouble reading/spelling the common words in FSRC, so I bought the phonics flashcards and pulled out all of the common words he’s learned. I’m hoping that extra review with the cards will help.

                      My concern is this: I am afraid we are going to hit another wall with FSRD, mainly a wall of frustration for him. My suspicion is that vowel teams and consonant blends are going to be tough for him. We will just continue to plug along and, regardless of where we are in the spring, continue on with reading over the summer; however, I am also trying to look ahead to next school year (August, for us). Should I wait until we get through FSRE and then reassess? Would SC2 be a good fit for him then? Should I change anything sooner? I get a little confused by the SC levels, but I’m wondering if Moose Moments would be a good transition. My daughter did MP1 and I don't see my son being ready for Storytime Treasures any time soon.

                      Thanks!

                      Melanie

                      SC2 sounds like a great program for next year. It reviews the things that he's struggling with and then slowly builds on them.

                      I'm thinking if you've made it this far without the Primary Readers you'll do just fine without them.

                      You can postpone FSR E if you wish and instead spend more time on reviewing the concepts taught thus far. I did FSR E with my son after we had finished first semester of SC 2. Sounds like it is also scheduled at the beginning of SC3 to, so you could feasibly wait until then too.

                      Have you considered purchasing the lesson plans for SC1 phonics and reading as a pdf downloand? Its very reasonably priced and then you will have all sorts of extra teaching ideas that may help solidify his skills.

                      Don't be afraid to slow down and work at his speed. The schedule is a guide, don't be a slave to it.
                      Married to DH for 13 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

                      DS10- Simply Classical 4 / Grade 3 Classic Core,
                      DD8- Grade 2 Classic Core,
                      DD 6- Classic Core Kindergarten

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Re-reading Phonics Readers

                        Originally posted by Colomama View Post

                        Have you considered purchasing the lesson plans for SC1 phonics and reading as a pdf downloand? Its very reasonably priced and then you will have all sorts of extra teaching ideas that may help solidify his skills.

                        Don't be afraid to slow down and work at his speed. The schedule is a guide, don't be a slave to it.
                        I HIGHLY recommend switching to the SC1 plans, immediately. Especially as you enter book D as they are scheduled differently (in MPK and SC1), considering the issues you are already seeing. I would also advise waiting on FSRE until a later time.
                        Christine

                        (2019/2020)
                        DD1 8/23/09 - SC5/6
                        DS2 9/1/11 - SC3,4, 5/6 combo
                        DD3 2/9/13 -SC2 to start, MP1 second semester

                        Previous Years
                        DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4’
                        DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2)
                        DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK)

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Re-reading Phonics Readers

                          Originally posted by Colomama View Post
                          SC2 sounds like a great program for next year. It reviews the things that he's struggling with and then slowly builds on them.

                          I'm thinking if you've made it this far without the Primary Readers you'll do just fine without them.

                          You can postpone FSR E if you wish and instead spend more time on reviewing the concepts taught thus far. I did FSR E with my son after we had finished first semester of SC 2. Sounds like it is also scheduled at the beginning of SC3 to, so you could feasibly wait until then too.

                          Have you considered purchasing the lesson plans for SC1 phonics and reading as a pdf downloand? Its very reasonably priced and then you will have all sorts of extra teaching ideas that may help solidify his skills.

                          Don't be afraid to slow down and work at his speed. The schedule is a guide, don't be a slave to it.
                          Originally posted by howiecram View Post
                          I HIGHLY recommend switching to the SC1 plans, immediately. Especially as you enter book D as they are scheduled differently (in MPK and SC1), considering the issues you are already seeing. I would also advise waiting on FSRE until a later time.
                          Thank you so much for these suggestions. I just downloaded the SC1 phonics plans and will start using them from where we are currently. I can see just by looking at them that he will enjoy the activities! Also, I wasn't aware there was a progression where book E could be postponed. After reading your response, I found the thread "FSR and SC 1, 2, 3." I was really nervous about book D, E, and beyond, but now things are making more sense.

                          Many thanks,
                          Melanie
                          Melanie

                          2018-2019:
                          DS 12 - 7M, MPOA
                          DD 10 - 5M, Delectare
                          DS 8 - 3M

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: Re-reading Phonics Readers

                            Just want to chime in with another vote for slowing down and moving to SC 2 after finishing book D.

                            My daughter (who doesn't have any extra challenges) really needed extra time with the long vowels in FSR D. So if you can't go at the pace of one vowel a week then do not stress. Also, I don't think he has to completely master them before moving on since they are reviewed in SC 2. One other idea is to briefly teach closed vs. open syllables -- if a syllable is closed then it has only one vowel and has a consonant at the end and the vowel will make its short sound. A syllable is open if it ends in a vowel, i.e. magic e. This was a bit helpful with my daughter when we went through book D. I repeated over and over again "What letter does that word end with?" "Is there an e at the end of that word?". There was lots of frustration and some days we just played games to work on the words. Writing the CVC word on a whiteboard, reading it, then adding an e, and reading it was helpful too. Slow and steady.

                            Also, you mentioned spelling the common words -- MP suggests that a list of common words is available to your child when you are dictating the words. That way they just have to find the right word and copy it. That makes it so much easier. MP says the focus is on reading in the K program. I expect this changes in SC 2 where you are really learning how to spell common words.

                            As far as the primary phonics readers go, sounds like you'll be fine without them. You just need readers that cover CVC and CVCe words.

                            Right now, I'm enjoying going through the SC 1 phonics plans. We've covered books A and B in two weeks and are going to slow down now we're in book C. I'm having him actually read all the stories in the books and we're covering the word cards up to whichever lesson we're working on for that story. I'm also going to have him draw the illustrations (which he really dislikes - but I'm now convinces is very good for him to do) once the workbook arrives. So we're doing it maybe at twice the rate suggested in the lesson plans, with all the supplemental activities that are not related to letter formation. He's liking the games, although they are hard for him. He hears all the sounds in words wonderfully now, but coming up with words that have a particular sound is really difficult for him. So we've been using a picture dictionary and our short cards to help with this. As a side note, I found a wonderful (cheap) set of onset/rime short cards on TPT. It has virtually all the word families you could want for short and long vowels, plus digraphs and blends. I just printed on card stock and cut out. I'm a bit OCD and it would have driven me crazy to have the consonant cards and ending cards with different size handwriting, placement, etc.

                            I've made a review box of sorts for the word cards -- with slots for review every day, every other day, one day a week, or once a month. So every day we cover that day, even or odd days, the days of the week, and the day of the month. Seems to help make sure we review words to build fluency, but not go through a ton of cards every day.
                            Susan

                            2018-2019
                            A (10) - Barton, R&S math 3, SC 3
                            C (9) - Barton, R&S math 2, SC 3
                            G (5) - Simply Classical C

                            Comment

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