Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

Question: individual lesson plans

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Question: individual lesson plans

    I had bought grade 1 before SC2 came out, and then we've been slow to get started due to his reading difficulties. He has jumped from not knowing all of the alphabet in June to reading Magic Tree House books. YAY! I'm just now prepping to start First Grade program the week after next. Looking through everything, I am most worried about the pace of the cursive and the depth of the sensory activities for phonics/spelling. His fine motor problems are still an issue, so I want to take cursive carefully. Now that he can see the letters, we've found that his ability to distinguish the sounds in similar letters like b/p/t is still lagging behind. He is pretty good at using context clues while reading to figure out when he's said the wrong word, but the weakness really stands out in word lists, so we'll still be working on that while in the first grade work. I also want to get the step-by-step sentences book.

    We use a different math program, because I already owned the whole set through 6th grade from my older boys, and its style works well with him. I think I am going to end up with 5+ books out every day just to get the daily lesson plans.

    If I buy the individual plans for all three of those areas, it almost equals the price of the whole lesson book for SC2, so I might just buy that instead. I am wondering if there are additional points and tips in the entire book? Are the individual lesson plans just the applicable lines from the weekly lesson plans? Is there somewhere that has more than, "Do this page" for the writing book? If that's all there is to it, I can just write it in on the First Grade book, but I thought there might be teacher's notes somewhere?
    Miah - married to Warcabbage, 3 boys, BS in social work, AS in Electrical Engineering Technology

    Evulcarrot - 18, freshman in college, Medical Technology , mild autism
    Battlebroccoli - 17, lives with grandma, attends a special high school program part time
    Doomsprout - 10, highly verbal moderate autism, anxiety, motor delays, sensory processing issues - SC 4 with R&S 4

    #2
    Re: Question: individual lesson plans

    Originally posted by Miah View Post
    I had bought grade 1 before SC2 came out, and then we've been slow to get started due to his reading difficulties. He has jumped from not knowing all of the alphabet in June to reading Magic Tree House books. YAY! I'm just now prepping to start First Grade program the week after next. Looking through everything, I am most worried about the pace of the cursive and the depth of the sensory activities for phonics/spelling. His fine motor problems are still an issue, so I want to take cursive carefully. Now that he can see the letters, we've found that his ability to distinguish the sounds in similar letters like b/p/t is still lagging behind. He is pretty good at using context clues while reading to figure out when he's said the wrong word, but the weakness really stands out in word lists, so we'll still be working on that while in the first grade work. I also want to get the step-by-step sentences book.

    We use a different math program, because I already owned the whole set through 6th grade from my older boys, and its style works well with him. I think I am going to end up with 5+ books out every day just to get the daily lesson plans.

    If I buy the individual plans for all three of those areas, it almost equals the price of the whole lesson book for SC2, so I might just buy that instead. I am wondering if there are additional points and tips in the entire book? Are the individual lesson plans just the applicable lines from the weekly lesson plans? Is there somewhere that has more than, "Do this page" for the writing book? If that's all there is to it, I can just write it in on the First Grade book, but I thought there might be teacher's notes somewhere?
    I'm confused on which plans you are wanting to use? Are you going to use the 1st grade phonics or do you think you want to use SC2 phonics? They are totally different and you will not "come out the same" as you do with SC1/MPK. They also use different materials (other than the flashcards and classical phonics). The cursive plans would probably be worth it to purchase. If you purchase individual lesson plans you get the helpful tips included as well. The writing, the instructions are really actually included in the workbook, so you might not need those. You can pace the step-by-step writing as you see fit. WE are not following any of the suggested paces listed! We do the Read-Aloud edition in 2 days (there are 3 sentences and then a picture to draw and caption). We do all 3 sentences the first day and then the picture and caption the second day. We did the Bible edition in 3 days. This worked because then on the days where there wasn't writing from the writing book, we did the copybook. I say "did" because we had to back out of some of the SC2 areas and continue to remediate. We are alternating the Read-Aloud and the Bible writing.

    Additionally, we purchased the full SC2 manual and when we needed to stop the phonics and spelling, I e-mailed MP and they sent me the digital copies for the areas we were still using. I was going a bit nuts not checking boxes for subjects we were not using! LOL. Also, the seasonal books in the enrichment weren't quite lining up for us. WE were only on week 12 or so and I wanted the Christmasy books now, but they aren't scheduled until week 15. So, there is less flipping. I just printed the individual subjects and the clip the pages I need for the week!
    Christine

    (2018-2019)
    DD1 8/23/09 - SC4
    DS2 9/1/11 - SC2
    DD3 2/9/13 - MPK

    Previous Years
    DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3)
    DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK)
    DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others!)

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Question: individual lesson plans

      Christine said, "you will not come out the same". Let me explain that because it's gotten to be a sticky point for us as well.

      SC1 and core k are very very similar content wise. Both cover the same material and skills, pretty much. SC1 just has a lot of awesome and incredibly useful hands on things for those learners that need it.

      SC2 begins to slow some core subjects down because they are traditionally very challenging for our special learners. Specifically, phonics for reading is slowed to half-pace. In classic grade 1 Storytime Treasures and More Treasures is covered. SC2 covers Storytime and SC3 will cover More Storytime.

      SC3 will slow math to half pace, taking two years to cover each rod and staff math grade level.

      So, the pacing starts to stretch.

      If you need to stretch cursive, have you seen the cursive practice sheets? You could add those in and stretch each letter to 2 weeks instead of 1.

      And I agree, no need for the writing schedule. Everything you need is in the student worktext. Just do a section a day. Choose between the Bible edition or read-aloud. Bible uses just the one book, read-aloud uses a different storybook every week. The idea is to read the story, from whichever edition you go with, every day. If youre cutting costs and have a poor library i would go for the Bible edition.

      Hopefully that helps
      Last edited by Colomama; 12-03-2016, 12:36 PM.
      Married to DH for 13 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

      DS10- Simply Classical 4 / Grade 3 Classic Core,
      DD8- Grade 2 Classic Core,
      DD 6- Classic Core Kindergarten

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Question: individual lesson plans

        I thought the writing looked self-contained. That's one thing off my list. The SC cursive is definitely on the list.

        What I am hoping for with the phonics is all the hands-on activities. I know I could look up activities, but I know me, if it isn't written down with check boxes, I won't get it done. I am on the fence with the Common Core 1 spelling for him, so I still might end up buying the SC spelling. I've put in my cart and taken it back out several times already. I have the CC spelling here though, so want to try it before buying a new one.

        Maybe the SC1 phonics lesson plans would be better to buy, and go through the hands on and aural activities as review to keep reinforcing those letters and sounds? Sometimes with him it seems like he learns something new in phonics and then can't remember the simplest things, or at least can't keep both in mind at the same time. Like I said, he can use context clues to figure out when he has used a wrong word, so it's like he can read at a higher level in context than he can single words. I don't know if that is a common thing or not. I have to keep showing him new materials, because he'll forget from one word to the next that he's supposed to be saying CH not K sounds, but he reads a text once and can almost quote it from memory, so he gets into faking it without actually knowing the phonics involved. He's a bit hard to parse sometimes. He also still can't say the TH sound, so that makes things hard for those words.
        Miah - married to Warcabbage, 3 boys, BS in social work, AS in Electrical Engineering Technology

        Evulcarrot - 18, freshman in college, Medical Technology , mild autism
        Battlebroccoli - 17, lives with grandma, attends a special high school program part time
        Doomsprout - 10, highly verbal moderate autism, anxiety, motor delays, sensory processing issues - SC 4 with R&S 4

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Question: individual lesson plans

          Maih, please turn on your private message button.

          Th was difficult around here too. The clincher was standing in front of the mirror and seeing / practicing tongue placement. We both stood in front of the bathroom mirror and practiced. He literally couldn't figure out how to make the sound and watching himself in the mirror was very helpful.

          The irritating part is there is no black and white rule for a voiced or unvoiced th sound (say this (voiced) vs. Thin (unvoiced). You just have to try the word both ways until it sounds correct. This is very irritating to my son because he doesn't want to be wrong.

          The nice thing about SC2 phonics is it is a different set of stories every day. So, his memorizing trick won't work with SC2 .
          Married to DH for 13 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

          DS10- Simply Classical 4 / Grade 3 Classic Core,
          DD8- Grade 2 Classic Core,
          DD 6- Classic Core Kindergarten

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Question: individual lesson plans

            Originally posted by Miah View Post
            Like I said, he can use context clues to figure out when he has used a wrong word, so it's like he can read at a higher level in context than he can single words. I don't know if that is a common thing or not. I have to keep showing him new materials, because he'll forget from one word to the next that he's supposed to be saying CH not K sounds, but he reads a text once and can almost quote it from memory, so he gets into faking it without actually knowing the phonics involved. He's a bit hard to parse sometimes. He also still can't say the TH sound, so that makes things hard for those words.
            This is my daughter to a "T" minus the speech issue. Our story is that we started homeschooling when my oldest (now 7) was a brand new 5 year old. (Her birthday is late Aug). She was a phonetic "genius" LOL She knew all the sounds the letters made and could tell me where they were in the words. It seemed like a natural step to begin blending. At first we started with 100ez lessons. She was still technically 4 when we began, but it went over like a lead balloon! So, then we kind of winged it for a bit. I used "This Reading Mamas" Bob book printable. She did ok with these, and was "reading" the Bob books, but it was still a major struggle. C-A-T, say it fast....."cast"? (what?? LOL) She still wasn't getting really getting it. On exactly her 1/2 birthday she finally got the blending aspect. I bought another reading program (it's a Catholic one called Little Angel Readers). I LOVED it! It's a complete language arts program (spelling, writing, reading, etc). However, it was taking 45 min - 1 hour to do a lesson (I had no idea back in the "day" that we could simply stop at some point in a lesson!!). I continued to search for a reading program. I stumbled on MP at a conference. However, I already have everything for our "1st" grade year and when I glanced at the MP materials, nothing jumped out at me saying "buy me instead". I did come home with a catalog though. (need I say more?). I began to really investigate curriculum and ultimately settled on MP (with hubby backing, even though I already had everything!). I looked at 1st grade and it looked REALLY hard. She was still just barely reading "cat" and sat", etc. The kids folks on the forum and at MP convinced me to get MPK. (actually, there was some decision on MPK or SC1 though I settled on MPK). At the time, the first 8 weeks just seemed SO easy that I didn't think she needed everything from SC1. (I was wrong). We actually sped along FSR through MPK and finished in late Feb. FSRE came out and we worked through that. However, there was a real struggle with book D and we should have taken a LONG pause there. Anyway, upon Cheryl's encouragement, we finally had my daughter tested (meanwhile we went through FSR again, with the SC1 plans, orally only, with some writing on a dry erase board). We did find she was asynchronous and has a poor working memory. I couldn't understand why she could read "Frog an Toad" or even "Little Bear" but decidable readers were extremely difficult. The test at least gave an answer. I had already purchased 1st grade, but sold it and got SC2. We worked through the first 8 or so weeks, but reading "A Grand Cat" was a struggle and she was doing the same as your son - reading paragraphs, but if I pulled those same words out and put them on flashcards or word lists, her accuracy rate was low. She would sometimes read the word correctly and sometimes wrong. My "wrong" stack was different, every.single.time. I suspect dyslexia, even though the test did not reveal it. We did drop out of SC2 and are working through All About Reading, level 1. I hated it for the first many lessons and thought we had wasted money, yet again. We are now 8 lessons from finishing level 1 and her reading had REALLy, REALLY improved. She can read words like "jump", "milk", crab, etc as well as lunchbox. She could not do this before. This may not be the path for you though. I guess I still don't know if you have done First Start Reading? If you haven't, then yes, perhaps FSR with the SC1 plans would be really helpful! The MPK lesson plans have you doing Book D totally differently than the SC1 plans and I wish we would have done the SC1 plans first. However, it still might not have been slow enough. I still have some gripes about AAR and plan to use FSR with my next child, even though we have what we need from AAR for my son. I'll hang onto it, in case we run into trouble though.

            So, after my long winded story, can you tell us more about how old your child is, what you have used, etc?
            Christine

            (2018-2019)
            DD1 8/23/09 - SC4
            DS2 9/1/11 - SC2
            DD3 2/9/13 - MPK

            Previous Years
            DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3)
            DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK)
            DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others!)

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Question: individual lesson plans

              Totally agreeing with Christine (howiecram). SC1 progress through FSR D is far superior to MPK. My daughter is half-way through book D using the MPK lesson plans. I have previously used SC1 with my older son and I like it far better.

              I couldn't quite put my finger on what was different this time through and that's it. MPK jumps around through the book while SC1 just goes straight through. I will be switching to the SC1 plans for the remainder of book d starting tomorrow.

              Thanks for pointing that out Christine! I couldn't see the forest for the trees. I'm glad to hear AAR is working well for you. I've always been tempted by it, but the cost kept scaring me off. I think their readers are just darling, but have decided to stick with Pathway books for extra reading.

              It's hard to switch programs or even just components, but it's also hard not to switch. To switch or not to switch, that's the question. Haha.
              Married to DH for 13 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

              DS10- Simply Classical 4 / Grade 3 Classic Core,
              DD8- Grade 2 Classic Core,
              DD 6- Classic Core Kindergarten

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Question: individual lesson plans

                Originally posted by Colomama View Post
                Totally agreeing with Christine (howiecram). SC1 progress through FSR D is far superior to MPK. My daughter is half-way through book D using the MPK lesson plans. I have previously used SC1 with my older son and I like it far better.

                I couldn't quite put my finger on what was different this time through and that's it. MPK jumps around through the book while SC1 just goes straight through. I will be switching to the SC1 plans for the remainder of book d starting tomorrow.

                Thanks for pointing that out Christine! I couldn't see the forest for the trees. I'm glad to hear AAR is working well for you. I've always been tempted by it, but the cost kept scaring me off. I think their readers are just darling, but have decided to stick with Pathway books for extra reading.

                It's hard to switch programs or even just components, but it's also hard not to switch. To switch or not to switch, that's the question. Haha.
                If you are successful with SC2, DON'T switch. AAR is working for us, but it really isn't what I thought it was going to be! I actually don't like the readers from AAR! I think they tried to make them like "real" books by putting hard covers on them, but they are kind of hard to hold for my daughter. Paper books are easier! I also learned (after I purchased from Rainbow Resources) that you have a whole YEAR to use the program! If you don't like it/if it doesn't work, you get to return it for a full refund! If someone were seriously considering it, buy it from All About Learning Press and pay the shipping!

                Seriously though, if SC2 is working for you, keep at it! Sc1/SC2 actually has the kinetic activities I would have preferred. I kept looking for them in AAR. I thought it was "multi-sensory". It is, but not in that way. The gist is, the first 20ish lessons are learning the sounds of the alphabet and short vowels. Even though I felt like we were beating a dead horse with short vowel words, we did it anyway. You read real words right away (just like with FSR). You usually would do a lesson with the letter tiles, maybe some cut/paste type activity (some sorting too), then that lesson is done. The next lesson is usually 1-2 stories. The "thing" with AAR is their word lists and phrases. So, there are long word lists (my daughter hates them) and then there are phrases using words you know. I think the phrase thing is what is helping. There are NO contextual clues, so she has to actually read them. Then, after the word lists and phrases, they do sentences, but it is progressive. So it would say:
                Dad is
                Dad is sad
                Dad is sad that Matt
                Dad is sad that Matt is sick. There are usually 3 or 4 of these.

                Before each story there are word lists and phrases. They always give some vocabulary and they try and work in other things that I think are unnecessary. (some geography and science, Language arts, etc) I just don't like it because it is random facts that I'm sure my daughter will never remember. They do, however, provide some context for the stories, I believe.

                Lastly, I think we are only successful with AAR due to Cheryl's support and having used SC1 and some of their tools in combination. We are re-reading Scamp and Tramp and then will also re-read "A Grand Cat". (during our "Christmas break") We will then start AAR Level 2. We will re-evaluate when we have completed that as to where to go from there! I hope not to need another level of AAR!

                OP - sorry for the de-railment. This reading business with struggling readers is so difficult! It's also difficult when to decide, like Michelle (Colomama) said when to switch or not. You want to have a solid foundation, so skipping around isn't helpful for your child either.

                We only switched after completing the entire FSR program and then re-peating it, orally! Again, I really don't think just starting with AAR would have given us the progress we are seeing now, the way we are seeing it.
                Last edited by howiecram; 12-04-2016, 08:51 PM.
                Christine

                (2018-2019)
                DD1 8/23/09 - SC4
                DS2 9/1/11 - SC2
                DD3 2/9/13 - MPK

                Previous Years
                DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3)
                DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK)
                DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others!)

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Question: individual lesson plans

                  Another question. I am eyeing those shiny Montessori cursive sandpaper letters. They are so expensive! Then I think, I could make those. Of course I am good at starting projects and not finishing them, and wonder about getting the glue into just the right shapes to match the fonts...which brings me back to the Montessori letters. Are they close enough in font to actually be useful with NAC? I am going to buy the cd so I could print the correct font if I try to make them.
                  Miah - married to Warcabbage, 3 boys, BS in social work, AS in Electrical Engineering Technology

                  Evulcarrot - 18, freshman in college, Medical Technology , mild autism
                  Battlebroccoli - 17, lives with grandma, attends a special high school program part time
                  Doomsprout - 10, highly verbal moderate autism, anxiety, motor delays, sensory processing issues - SC 4 with R&S 4

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Question: individual lesson plans

                    Originally posted by Miah View Post
                    I had bought grade 1 before SC2 came out, and then we've been slow to get started due to his reading difficulties. He has jumped from not knowing all of the alphabet in June to reading Magic Tree House books. YAY! I'm just now prepping to start First Grade program the week after next. Looking through everything, I am most worried about the pace of the cursive and the depth of the sensory activities for phonics/spelling. His fine motor problems are still an issue, so I want to take cursive carefully. Now that he can see the letters, we've found that his ability to distinguish the sounds in similar letters like b/p/t is still lagging behind. He is pretty good at using context clues while reading to figure out when he's said the wrong word, but the weakness really stands out in word lists, so we'll still be working on that while in the first grade work. I also want to get the step-by-step sentences book.

                    We use a different math program, because I already owned the whole set through 6th grade from my older boys, and its style works well with him. I think I am going to end up with 5+ books out every day just to get the daily lesson plans.

                    If I buy the individual plans for all three of those areas, it almost equals the price of the whole lesson book for SC2, so I might just buy that instead. I am wondering if there are additional points and tips in the entire book? Are the individual lesson plans just the applicable lines from the weekly lesson plans? Is there somewhere that has more than, "Do this page" for the writing book? If that's all there is to it, I can just write it in on the First Grade book, but I thought there might be teacher's notes somewhere?
                    Hi, Miah.

                    Your youngest is reading Magic Tree House books?! So happy for him.

                    You have several options:

                    1. Order the full SC 2 Curriculum Guide and SC Writng Step-by-Step Sentences. This will give you the greatest flexibility throughout the year. You can study the phonics and spelling ahead of time and decide if you want to a) follow MP 1 exactly, b) follow SC 2 and order those phonics/spelling books, or c) use the SC 2 plans for extra tips (built-in vertical writing, VAKT activities) to add here and there with your daily MP 1 phonics lessons.

                    Within the SC 2 Curriculum Guide, you also receive an appendix with extra visual aides for comprehension. You also receive broken-down recitations that might be helpful to you.

                    Or...

                    2.) Order only a) Cursive Indiv. Lesson Plans and b) Phonics Indiv. Lesson Plans. You do NOT need writing plans. As you suspected, the Indiv. plans will only schedule the SC Writing components for you.


                    Either way, order early enough to allow yourself time for a good "game plan" before you start. If you need any more help, feel free to ask.

                    Good to hear from you!

                    Cheryl

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Question: individual lesson plans

                      So, after my long winded story, can you tell us more about how old your child is, what you have used, etc?
                      He is 8 1/2. We first started when he was about 3 1/2 with the Mennonite preschool books. Then moved into MP Preschool when he was 4. MP Jr K when he was 5, and Kindergarten when he was almost 7. He has two older brothers (15 & 16), and I finally found and fell in love with MP about the time they really, really wanted to go back to public school, so didn't do them a lot of good, but the youngest got to start at the beginning with MP. We officially filed the Kindergarten waiver with him, due to his immaturity and late birthday, so he is only in second grade as far as the state is concerned.

                      He is on grade level for math. In fact, if I would give him higher level books, he is probably way above grade level in math. He can work three digit addition and subtraction in his head. Writing it down is harder. He has an amazing memory unless you are asking him to put things in a specific order. We've been working on the days of the week and months of the year for years. He still can't say the alphabet in order. (Interestingly I couldn't say the alphabet in order until I was in first or second grade myself, even though I was reading at 2 1/2.)

                      He was considered level II on the DSM V Autism Scales. Would have been more like severe Asperger's under the old scales, because he talks so well. More specifically, he is diagnosed with sensory processing disorder--sensory avoidant for smell and sound especially, also has modulation problems with visually busy places or work pages. I love the simplicity of MP products for helping avoid this--fine motor delays, visual motor integration delays, low upper body muscle tone (OT twice a week for these), several different eye motor delays including tracking, saccades (this one is moving the eyes to different targets, I think. The eye thing is still new to me), convergence issues, and I think a couple more (Vision Therapy once a week for this, with a bonus of three hours in the car that day). He has severe anxiety (Anxiety NOS), a perfectionistic streak (it took us most of the preschool program before just sitting at the table and trying something he wouldn't do perfectly the first time didn't equal an hour long meltdown), and pragmatic language delay (speech hippotherapy for this and the sensory issues at the same time. He is getting to learn how to use the reins, and they may take him in their separate therapeutic riding program this summer to become an independent rider. He's pretty proud of himself for that).

                      Physically, he has stomach issues, sleep issues, allergies, asthma, eczema, and a fairly new food allergy.

                      Some new activities: He is able to be in a group long enough now that he has joined the beginning orchestra. He had the director for private lessons last year. It is a small program. Five other kids in that level, and the director also has an autistic child and a Master's in Music Education and something in special education, so she works with him. He started singing this last summer! He had never done that before, but now sings all the time, making up little things about what he is doing at the time. He joined the 8-15 year musical theater program by the same people that do the orchestra. They did "A Dickens of a Christmas". He had all the songs and most of the dialogue memorized for every part, though being new his parts were all very small. The performances were tough, but he enjoyed it all. Very proud of himself! He got pet mice as an early Christmas present, and besides being entertaining to watch, he has been really responsible with them so far. Being a kid, we'll see how long that lasts, lol.

                      Some new challenges: The last few months he has started chewing on non-food items and trying to eat random things, especially paper. He is also now running in stores and in parking lots, so we have to keep an incredibly close eye and an iron grip on him or dump him in the buggy as soon as we can at the stores, because no sense of car danger or keeping his eye on not bumping displays or other shoppers and also with trying to put things in his mouth at the stores. He is not ADHD. He never had any symptoms of it when he was younger (and I have an older kid who is very high on the ADHD scale, so I know what it's like living with a hyperactive small child), but recently (since he was well over 8) he is behaving exactly like a child with ADHD. He's into everything, talking non-stop without really saying anything, bouncing around like he's wearing springs that sort of thing. His concentration is even off. We've been to his PCP who checked his thyroid and blood count. I suspect it is at least partially to do with sleep. His sleep has been particularly disturbed ever since we had to go to my sister's wedding back in September (flights and tons of driving, and drama, and massive schedule disruption). He's still having nightmares nearly every night (those were present before, but not so often). We have gotten him back into going to sleep at a decent time, and even in his room (though not his bed, he's on bean bags in the floor) with his routine. We have a referral to the sleep clinic, but that's about a year wait. Access to specialty care is ridiculous in our rural state.
                      Miah - married to Warcabbage, 3 boys, BS in social work, AS in Electrical Engineering Technology

                      Evulcarrot - 18, freshman in college, Medical Technology , mild autism
                      Battlebroccoli - 17, lives with grandma, attends a special high school program part time
                      Doomsprout - 10, highly verbal moderate autism, anxiety, motor delays, sensory processing issues - SC 4 with R&S 4

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Question: individual lesson plans

                        Originally posted by Miah View Post
                        Another question. I am eyeing those shiny Montessori cursive sandpaper letters. They are so expensive! Then I think, I could make those. Of course I am good at starting projects and not finishing them, and wonder about getting the glue into just the right shapes to match the fonts...which brings me back to the Montessori letters. Are they close enough in font to actually be useful with NAC? I am going to buy the cd so I could print the correct font if I try to make them.
                        They're not exact so Cheryl advises not using them, especially when first learning NAC. There are several options:

                        1) make them using the NAC CD, fine grit sandpaper and spray adhesive (time-consuming and you have to trace the letters backwards onto the back of the sandpaper or they won't be facing the right direction when you go to glue them to cardstock or masonite board)
                        2) trace the letter outlines onto a piece of sandpaper and just have them trace within the outlines (no "control of error" though when they go outside the lines since the whole piece has the same texture)
                        4) skip the sandpaper and use the wet/dry or write/erase methods: write the letter on a chalkboard or white board (full size or lap board) and have them erase it by tracing over with their finger or a small wet sponge. If you're using the sponge option on a chalkboard they can repeat the motion multiple times with the same letter as it dries
                        Jennifer


                        2018-2019
                        DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
                        DS-12 (6M)
                        DS-10 (SC3)
                        DD-8 (MP2)
                        DD-6 (SC2)
                        DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X