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Progress! and another question...

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    Progress! and another question...

    So, one of the benefits of co-op: it propelled E to want to work with FSR so that she could be like her best friend, a little girl who is a year older and working in Book A as well. E is reading and doing the writing portion now and LOVING her school work! Some days it's a full page, some days its one or two lines, but I told her she must do school daily instead of picking/choosing when she was going to do it.

    As for my 8 year old son...he just started Book B in FSR. About halfway through Book A he started regressing in his behavior toward school. It corresponded to when the actual reading art of the program picked up. He CAN read, but he HATES it. At the same time, he is trying to read ahead in Fun in the Sun because we told him he can't get a library card until he is able to read a picture book by himself. He's standing next to me right now whining "I HATE SCHOOL!" He says its because school "takes forever" and he "wants to do other things" and that school is "too hard" because of "the sounds and stuff" and it "takes up alot of time for him to play and...makes playtime shorter". I've told him that it's his job at his age, that it would take less time if he complained less, etc.

    I'm really not sure how to get him through this. I can't decrease the amount of time he spends on school...if he did it without complaining the FSR assignments would only take about 15 minutes a day since it's mostly review for him. FSR and XtraMath are the only things he does everyday. Copybook is only twice a week (one day writing, another day proofing -- and proofing takes no time at all). Religion is just read-alouds from Scripture, his catechism books and another supplemental book we use.

    Part of me says that he should be doing FAR more at his age, but then he keeps telling me that what he's doing is too hard even though it's mostly review. We run into the same thing with any kind of "work" including chores, getting dressed (if his clothes aren't on his shelf), etc. Unfortunately, the recession hit us when he was a baby, causing the bottom to fall out of our lives and he consequently fell through the cracks in our usual "kids do chores starting at a young age" method of parenting as we were focused on just surviving. He acts half his age in everything
    Jennifer


    2018-2019
    DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
    DS-12 (6M)
    DS-10 (SC3)
    DD-8 (MP2)
    DD-6 (SC2)
    DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

    #2
    Re: Progress! and another question...

    Jen,

    You are in a hard spot, but take heart. The issue you are having with your son is a common one. I remember from my home school days hearing some of those exact quotes from my sons. My first suggestion is to make school more "matter of fact". By that I mean set age/level appropriate lesson plans, show these to your son and stick to them. Use the curriculum manual as a guide for how much work is appropriate in a day/week. You are correct in that by 8 more can be expected than what you currently listed.

    Show the work that is expected for the day first thing in the morning and allow your child to check off the work as it is completed. He needs to know the expectation and be able to see how close to being finished he is. If my child was uncooperative and refused to do his work, I sent him to sit on his bed to think about it while I worked with my other children. The child soon found that in the afternoon while everyone else was at play, because their work was done, he still had to complete his lessons at the kitchen table as I was preparing dinner and some nights after dinner. This did not happen often, it was merely a testing to see if I was going to stick to the expectation. Some children will need to test this to see if you really mean it. Many times students will do only what they need to get by and be done. It is important therefore to maintain expectations. We had a strict "work before play" mantra. Of course we had play/movement/recess times built into our day, especially during the primary ages. Movement (not screen time) is imperative also for this age in order to maintain periods of focus.

    Consider, too, that phonics may be difficult for him and may require more of his, and your, time. If this is the area in which he struggles, tackle it first thing in the morning. You may also want to break up the lesson into smaller, more digestible, pieces. Teach the phonics lesson first, then have time for movement. After 10 minutes or so, quickly review the phonics again before the reading. Oral reading practice is imperative at this stage. Have him read aloud to siblings, into a recording device (to make his own homemade books on tape), over the phone to a grandparent or aloud as you are folding laundry or cooking.

    Someone else will have to comment on the chores, because that is not my area of expertise......


    Please write back if these techniques don't work for you. I am confident others have advice as well.


    Blessings,
    Michelle T

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Progress! and another question...

      My son, too, is like this! (he is 5) I am not sure I really have any helpful tips, except to commiserate. HE takes a LONG time to "get on the bus" so to speak. In, pretty much everything and almost literally (bus being car). It's a struggle to get shoes on...now we have to have coats and oh dear. I have to allow an additional 15 min + to make sure we are on time for an appointment or class.

      We started SCC with him this year. I knew it would be a struggle to begin and it was. However, my expectation was that it would be a struggle, so when it was, "I" didn't lose my cool. I do have some trouble with ok, he isn't doing it now, so what do I do in the meantime? It is a struggle when you have many children because if your consequence is "you will sit on your bed and do nothing" you have to follow through and make sure child does it. If child gets up, you have to make them go back to the bed (or whatever). So, it is totally wasting time. (I could be working with other children!) However, it does usually bare fruit in a few weeks. I always expect about 3 days of this push back. It will usually take him another 3-4 weeks to get on board, but the struggle will be less. After it is just what we do, he is better about it. WE took a VERY short Thanksgiving break (Th-S only) and Monday he wouldn't get dressed. I had already forgotten that when routine is broken, we have to retrain, every.single.time! There was less push back today, but he did complain about stopping his playing.


      Lastly, it is late Nov and we did not have a consistent time for getting dressed, until August and it was very real struggle every day. He only just stopped complaining and doing it HIMSELF in early Nov. So, yes it took a good 3 months...and then we altered the routine for a few days at Thanksgiving and WHAM.....
      Christine

      (2018-2019)
      DD1 8/23/09 - SC4
      DS2 9/1/11 - SC2
      DD3 2/9/13 - MPK

      Previous Years
      DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3)
      DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK)
      DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others!)

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Progress! and another question...

        Hi, Jen.

        First, congratulations on your daughter's progress! This is very encouraging.

        Regarding your son... this is the same son as in this post, correct? You mentioned "hyper-as-anything" in that post, as well as a reluctance to work, do chores, and even dress himself in this post. Perhaps you are seeing his internal difficulties, such as executive function and challenges with concentration, manifested with any task that requires 1.) step-by-step actions and 2.) sustained attention. Given familial issues, this seems likely. If you feel uncertain as to whether you "know" his challenges well, it might be worth a full evaluation to uncover true areas of need. He may truly feel undue pressure internally with such demands, because he cannot "get it all together" as easily as other children do.


        That said, I agree with Michelle T. Being "matter of fact" is so important, whether this is internal, purely manipulative, or a combination of both. Do not let him drag YOU "off-task" with his complaints. Just point to the book, "Number two," or to his clothes, "What are you supposed to be doing?" ("Getting dressed.") Be more relentless in your steadfastness to work than he is in his complaints.


        Remember that you're training long-term. Even though your family experienced an enormous crisis and upheaval several years ago, and even if you can see other explanations, you will want to train him to learn to keep working without complaining. It sounds like you do not need to reduce his current workload based on his demands, but you will want to be sure the steps are clear, based on his needs.

        Here are some ideas for breaking down tasks into smaller steps:
        -Creating brief checklists.
        -Setting out his clothes at night.
        -Placing a brightly colored checkmark after each completed step in his books.
        -Praising completion of smaller steps, which might encourage more. ("You read that first line. Very good! Let's hear line #2....")
        -Timing his work completion, as if in a race to persevere. ("Yesterday we spent 20 minutes on reading. Today you read the passage straight through, and you finished in 10 minutes!")

        Avoid nagging and lecturing in the moment. You might do this by saving discussions about proper work habits for before or after the actual work. During work, just keep getting him back on task for the work.


        If prayer is part of your Opening, you might also begin with something like this, or find another and pray the same prayer daily out loud, so they can eventually memorize:

        Dear Heavenly Father,
        Thank you for the work we been given today. We pray that you will help our hearts and minds focus on our necessary work. We know that this work is good for us. We look forward to time to play when our work is finished. Help us not to grumble or complain, but to do our work quietly with respect for those you have placed over us. Strengthen all those who teach and all those who learn. In Jesus' Name. Amen.


        ...


        Hang in there. I remember a time (years) when I cringed before asking my son to empty the dishwasher or even pick up a sock! I dreaded the complaints so much, I was tempted just to do everything myself. Yet today, at 21, my son often thinks about doing some chores before I do! "Mom, I didn't want to wake you, so I set my alarm and took the trash down in time this morning." (???) All of these moments, days, and years of your hard work right now may very well add up to a young man who is more responsible and capable than you ever dreamed possible. And if he needs additional help or evaluations now, be sure you obtain these for him.


        Stay strong. Reading, writing, arithmetic, completing chores, and getting dressed are, as you have said, his small but important jobs right now. The discipline of working is worthwhile in itself. Stay the course. One day he might even thank you.


        Cheryl

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Progress! and another question...

          Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
          Hi, Jen.

          First, congratulations on your daughter's progress! This is very encouraging.

          Regarding your son... this is the same son as in this post, correct? You mentioned "hyper-as-anything" in that post, as well as a reluctance to work, do chores, and even dress himself in this post. Perhaps you are seeing his internal difficulties, such as executive function and challenges with concentration, manifested with any task that requires 1.) step-by-step actions and 2.) sustained attention. Given familial issues, this seems likely. If you feel uncertain as to whether you "know" his challenges well, it might be worth a full evaluation to uncover true areas of need. He may truly feel undue pressure internally with such demands, because he cannot "get it all together" as easily as other children do.


          That said, I agree with Michelle T. Being "matter of fact" is so important, whether this is internal, purely manipulative, or a combination of both. Do not let him drag YOU "off-task" with his complaints. Just point to the book, "Number two," or to his clothes, "What are you supposed to be doing?" ("Getting dressed.") Be more relentless in your steadfastness to work than he is in his complaints.


          Remember that you're training long-term. Even though your family experienced an enormous crisis and upheaval several years ago, and even if you can see other explanations, you will want to train him to learn to keep working without complaining. It sounds like you do not need to reduce his current workload based on his demands, but you will want to be sure the steps are clear, based on his needs.

          Here are some ideas for breaking down tasks into smaller steps:
          -Creating brief checklists.
          -Setting out his clothes at night.
          -Placing a brightly colored checkmark after each completed step in his books.
          -Praising completion of smaller steps, which might encourage more. ("You read that first line. Very good! Let's hear line #2....")
          -Timing his work completion, as if in a race to persevere. ("Yesterday we spent 20 minutes on reading. Today you read the passage straight through, and you finished in 10 minutes!")

          Avoid nagging and lecturing in the moment. You might do this by saving discussions about proper work habits for before or after the actual work. During work, just keep getting him back on task for the work.


          If prayer is part of your Opening, you might also begin with something like this, or find another and pray the same prayer daily out loud, so they can eventually memorize:

          Dear Heavenly Father,
          Thank you for the work we been given today. We pray that you will help our hearts and minds focus on our necessary work. We know that this work is good for us. We look forward to time to play when our work is finished. Help us not to grumble or complain, but to do our work quietly with respect for those you have placed over us. Strengthen all those who teach and all those who learn. In Jesus' Name. Amen.


          ...


          Hang in there. I remember a time (years) when I cringed before asking my son to empty the dishwasher or even pick up a sock! I dreaded the complaints so much, I was tempted just to do everything myself. Yet today, at 21, my son often thinks about doing some chores before I do! "Mom, I didn't want to wake you, so I set my alarm and took the trash down in time this morning." (???) All of these moments, days, and years of your hard work right now may very well add up to a young man who is more responsible and capable than you ever dreamed possible. And if he needs additional help or evaluations now, be sure you obtain these for him.


          Stay strong. Reading, writing, arithmetic, completing chores, and getting dressed are, as you have said, his small but important jobs right now. The discipline of working is worthwhile in itself. Stay the course. One day he might even thank you.


          Cheryl
          I've definitely learned to be matter-of-fact and to enforce "blackout" until the work is done. I just wish that I could get him beyond that. I'll need to try the movement incentives and marking mini-milestones. Michelle's post also reminded me of something that happened last year: when he would read to his baby sister, he actually forgot to complain about reading! Maybe I need to set him up as her read-aloud person from time to time as well.

          Thank you for the great ideas! I'll let you know how it goes!
          Jennifer


          2018-2019
          DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
          DS-12 (6M)
          DS-10 (SC3)
          DD-8 (MP2)
          DD-6 (SC2)
          DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Progress! and another question...

            Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
            Hi, Jen.

            First, congratulations on your daughter's progress! This is very encouraging.

            Regarding your son... this is the same son as in this post, correct? You mentioned "hyper-as-anything" in that post, as well as a reluctance to work, do chores, and even dress himself in this post. Perhaps you are seeing his internal difficulties, such as executive function and challenges with concentration, manifested with any task that requires 1.) step-by-step actions and 2.) sustained attention. Given familial issues, this seems likely. If you feel uncertain as to whether you "know" his challenges well, it might be worth a full evaluation to uncover true areas of need. He may truly feel undue pressure internally with such demands, because he cannot "get it all together" as easily as other children do.


            That said, I agree with Michelle T. Being "matter of fact" is so important, whether this is internal, purely manipulative, or a combination of both. Do not let him drag YOU "off-task" with his complaints. Just point to the book, "Number two," or to his clothes, "What are you supposed to be doing?" ("Getting dressed.") Be more relentless in your steadfastness to work than he is in his complaints.


            Remember that you're training long-term. Even though your family experienced an enormous crisis and upheaval several years ago, and even if you can see other explanations, you will want to train him to learn to keep working without complaining. It sounds like you do not need to reduce his current workload based on his demands, but you will want to be sure the steps are clear, based on his needs.

            Here are some ideas for breaking down tasks into smaller steps:
            -Creating brief checklists.
            -Setting out his clothes at night.
            -Placing a brightly colored checkmark after each completed step in his books.
            -Praising completion of smaller steps, which might encourage more. ("You read that first line. Very good! Let's hear line #2....")
            -Timing his work completion, as if in a race to persevere. ("Yesterday we spent 20 minutes on reading. Today you read the passage straight through, and you finished in 10 minutes!")

            Avoid nagging and lecturing in the moment. You might do this by saving discussions about proper work habits for before or after the actual work. During work, just keep getting him back on task for the work.


            If prayer is part of your Opening, you might also begin with something like this, or find another and pray the same prayer daily out loud, so they can eventually memorize:

            Dear Heavenly Father,
            Thank you for the work we been given today. We pray that you will help our hearts and minds focus on our necessary work. We know that this work is good for us. We look forward to time to play when our work is finished. Help us not to grumble or complain, but to do our work quietly with respect for those you have placed over us. Strengthen all those who teach and all those who learn. In Jesus' Name. Amen.


            ...


            Hang in there. I remember a time (years) when I cringed before asking my son to empty the dishwasher or even pick up a sock! I dreaded the complaints so much, I was tempted just to do everything myself. Yet today, at 21, my son often thinks about doing some chores before I do! "Mom, I didn't want to wake you, so I set my alarm and took the trash down in time this morning." (???) All of these moments, days, and years of your hard work right now may very well add up to a young man who is more responsible and capable than you ever dreamed possible. And if he needs additional help or evaluations now, be sure you obtain these for him.


            Stay strong. Reading, writing, arithmetic, completing chores, and getting dressed are, as you have said, his small but important jobs right now. The discipline of working is worthwhile in itself. Stay the course. One day he might even thank you.


            Cheryl
            ABSOLUTELY. This!

            We are also working through a study resource as a family -- "Because I Said So: A Biblical Study on Obedience" from Kim Sorgius at her website, "Not Consumed". The Junior, Digital version (geared for ages 4-8) is $6.00 for CyberMonday. You might want to check that out as well.
            https://store.notconsumed.com/produc...nt=25926109064

            Big validation and understanding here! Been there!
            Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
            Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
            Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
            Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

            “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
            ~Pope St John Paul II

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Progress! and another question...

              I totally here you! My 8 year old is still avoiding math. It's 4:15.

              Some pointers from a fellow trench mucker...
              1. My son could / would easily derail the entire day for the entire family in just a few short moments of school starting. I found it took the wind right out of his sails when, as another poster said, I sent him to his bedroom for antics not conducive to school. He lost his audience. It took all of the 'fun' right out of misbehavior.

              2. Check lists, honey, check lists. My son still forgets breakfast until we're sitting down for school. What? How did you forget breakfast? Again?!? Put it on a checklist. We use pictures. Keep it at his level and he can check things off. His morning one could include: go potty, brush teeth, get dressed, make bed, eat breakfast.

              3. Have a different one for school. I laminated 8x11 cardstock and used self-adhesive velcro stickers. Each subject has its own reusable 'sticker'. The top says 'Look what I did today!" When they finish a subject, they can stick their sticker on. Dad checks it when he gets home.

              3. Be clear on expectations. You are.

              4. Understand that this is child God blessed you with. He is not someone else. We can mourn the child we wish we had, but God gave us this one. We need to adjust our thinking to accept that. Other kids may not need as much hand-holding at this age, but he does. Other kids may be able to do more school, but he's at his limit. Accept this and embrace it. It's literally freeing when we change our perspective and accept God's plan for us
              Married to DH for 13 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

              DS10- Simply Classical 4 / Grade 3 Classic Core,
              DD8- Grade 2 Classic Core,
              DD 6- Classic Core Kindergarten

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Progress! and another question...

                Originally posted by Colomama View Post
                I totally here you! My 8 year old is still avoiding math. It's 4:15.

                Some pointers from a fellow trench mucker...
                1. My son could / would easily derail the entire day for the entire family in just a few short moments of school starting. I found it took the wind right out of his sails when, as another poster said, I sent him to his bedroom for antics not conducive to school. He lost his audience. It took all of the 'fun' right out of misbehavior.

                2. Check lists, honey, check lists. My son still forgets breakfast until we're sitting down for school. What? How did you forget breakfast? Again?!? Put it on a checklist. We use pictures. Keep it at his level and he can check things off. His morning one could include: go potty, brush teeth, get dressed, make bed, eat breakfast.

                3. Have a different one for school. I laminated 8x11 cardstock and used self-adhesive velcro stickers. Each subject has its own reusable 'sticker'. The top says 'Look what I did today!" When they finish a subject, they can stick their sticker on. Dad checks it when he gets home.

                3. Be clear on expectations. You are.

                4. Understand that this is child God blessed you with. He is not someone else. We can mourn the child we wish we had, but God gave us this one. We need to adjust our thinking to accept that. Other kids may not need as much hand-holding at this age, but he does. Other kids may be able to do more school, but he's at his limit. Accept this and embrace it. It's literally freeing when we change our perspective and accept God's plan for us
                Yep, we do the checklist for him (pictures and text) but he still wasn't following it. My husband stepped in and told him that if his morning chores aren't done before 7:30 he'll have Daddy to answer to. It seems to have worked so far

                I think the foundation of this is internal (ADHD) but some of it has also led to a habit of not wanting to work.

                I was thinking about how to do a school checklist...I think the interactive nature of the one you described would really work well for him. If only the kids hadn't gotten into my Velcro roll a few weeks ago! I might still have some around here though...

                Despite all his antics he's one of my most carefree and charming little munchkins so, while it's frustrating that he acts like he's four, it could always be worse. I wish I knew how to help him get past it more quickly, but like you said we have to take where we're at and let God work at His pace. Just want to make sure I'm doing my part!
                Last edited by jen1134; 11-29-2016, 08:45 PM.
                Jennifer


                2018-2019
                DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
                DS-12 (6M)
                DS-10 (SC3)
                DD-8 (MP2)
                DD-6 (SC2)
                DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Progress! and another question...

                  We're slowly getting more to the root of the problem here...

                  C and I had a long talk this morning. He said that these are the reasons he doesn't like school:

                  1. It FEELS like it takes too long, even when it's only 15 minutes
                  2. He would rather be playing
                  3. He's frustrated that he can't read the books he wants to read because he doesn't know all the words yet
                  4. He doesn't want to take more time on school though to be able to read those books sooner
                  5. He likes his sister's Montessori apps better because it tells him the sounds, there's things to do, etc.
                  6. He doesn't see the point/purpose of his daily lessons (I tried to explain the point of today's lesson -- teaching new word families so we can expand how many words we can read; he wasn't very impressed)
                  7. When he trys to think of a letter/sound, his mind wanders and he has to stop and think "where was I" (we know he has ADHD)

                  Based on these:

                  1.what can I do to make his FSR lessons more "interactive"?
                  2.Is there any way to help him advance more quickly without feeling overwhelmed by the time aspect?

                  I think the K materials are too young content-wise and that may be causing some of the lack of interest. He's the type of kid who comes up with deep observations on things and Mac and Tab just isn't engaging him -- but that's all he can read right now skill-wise!

                  I'm also thinking of having him practice some 15-second focus exercises, hopefully we can gradually build him up from there. I don't like the eastern/new age bent of a lot of the mindfulness tools out there, but I figure I can have him just focus on a beautiful piece of art or a Crucifix or something along those lines.
                  Jennifer


                  2018-2019
                  DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
                  DS-12 (6M)
                  DS-10 (SC3)
                  DD-8 (MP2)
                  DD-6 (SC2)
                  DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Progress! and another question...

                    Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
                    We're slowly getting more to the root of the problem here...

                    1.what can I do to make his FSR lessons more "interactive"?
                    2.Is there any way to help him advance more quickly without feeling overwhelmed by the time aspect?

                    I think the K materials are too young content-wise and that may be causing some of the lack of interest. He's the type of kid who comes up with deep observations on things and Mac and Tab just isn't engaging him -- but that's all he can read right now skill-wise!

                    I'm also thinking of having him practice some 15-second focus exercises, hopefully we can gradually build him up from there. I don't like the eastern/new age bent of a lot of the mindfulness tools out there, but I figure I can have him just focus on a beautiful piece of art or a Crucifix or something along those lines.

                    1. Scroll down to get the SC 1 lesson plans for Phonics & Reading. These will cover FSR B, C, and D. The plans offer many interactive, even kinesthetic, activities, and you can apply them side-by-side with MP 1 for many lessons.

                    2. Advancing might take some experimentation. Just try not to let his verbal (or nonverbal) complaints dictate the pace. Set a pace for, say, two weeks. Then re-evaluate. Assure him that you will take him at the pace that is best for him. As you have been doing, tell him that you will move as quickly as possible, so he can learn to read good books, but not so quickly that he will lack needed skills.

                    15-second focusing - You can use your MP K Art Cards for this. "Sustained Silent Art Gazing" is my updated version of the old "Sustained Silent Reading" idea. Set a timer, if needed, and expand to 30-second gazing. Then ask a few of the questions in your Enrichment Guide. This way you're improving attention, observation, and focus while cultivating art appreciation and a taste for excellence.


                    Your heart-to-heart was revealing. Now you can move forward!

                    Thanks for the update --

                    Cheryl

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Progress! and another question...

                      Jen, your son sounds like mine, but mine is 11. He's been saying exactly the same things your son is since he was 8 (or before). The climax for me was when he said school was hard and boring. I can get one or the other, but not both. The problem here - and I suspect with your son - is that he is very intelligent and comprehends well, but skills are hard. After testing, we found that his processing speed is low, like single digit percent low. He is capable of understanding the material, but he can hold very little in his head at one time, it takes him for.e.ver to do anything, and he forgets most of it.

                      What I wished I'd done then that we are doing now:
                      1. Exercise or heavy work is a must first. Either we go outside, do yoga, calisthenics, or therapy ball work for 45 minutes or so. I'm learning from OT that it's not just getting his hyper out (he's inattentive, not hyper anyway), it centers him. He needs to wake-up, in a way, to be able to focus on his work.
                      2. Then we do 20-40 minutes of varied work, half hard, half easy, ex. 5 minutes fact review, 15 minutes oral math, then 20 minutes reading. I know that doesn't sound like much, but it takes him so much brain power to do those 20 minutes of math. Then he can read science/history because he can do that easily.
                      3. I repeat that later. I've found at 10 am he will fight an hour to get 5 minutes of work done. At 7 pm, it gets done. I'm trying to split it up and see what works for him. One session, I'll do math. Later, after more exercise or hard play, we'll do writing. Those are his hard subjects.

                      Yes routine and lists are important, but through OT, I'm finding that he needs more input to prepare his mind for work that's hard or unfun.

                      On the reading, could you do the reading lessons from FSR, but then get a book he does want to read that has large enough type (a Step 1 or something) to practice? Just have him read. When he gets to a word he doesn't know, tell him what it is. I've done that with both my sons once they got past the very basic phonics or got to 8. They grew faster in their ability then. Also, for the ADD one, I had him read 5 minutes 2 or 3 times a day.

                      Last, have you looked into metrinome work for sustained attention? You put an app on your phone, set it to about 60 bpm, then have him clap to the beat for 20 mins. Ok, we've made it 5 minutes clapping. Then we switch and tap knees for 5 mins, or cross hand to knee, or rhythm sticks, or drum beat or march. Anyway, we are just starting, but we'll see if it helps with focus.
                      Michelle in Central Tx
                      DS 12 (4A modified), Ds 9 (4M), DS 5 (K)

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Progress! and another question...

                        Well, based on everyone's advice, here's what I did:

                        1. Mini-milestones/Visual checklists

                        I made a stack of index cards with each card focused on a specific segment of our day: Getting ready for the day, Getting ready for school, etc. and included little drawings for each item (he caught a few items that I forgot to do that with!) I then put the index cards into a plastic badge holder that clips to C's belt loop with a caribiner. He follows the flow on one card and then puts it to the back and can focus on the next card. I kept the number of things on each card to a minimum as much as possible.

                        2. Movement plan

                        I found a checklist for sensory avoidance/seeking and went through it with my husband and one of C's brothers. We found which sensory areas he avoids and which he seeks and I made a list from most avoided to least and most sought to least sought. I then used a Sensory Diet Activity list to choose items from the areas he generally seeks. (I still have to figure out how to address the avoidance ones). So his movement plan is:

                        Jump on a trampoline to a metronome beat (otherwise he gets too wound up) for 1 minute
                        Push-ups for 1 minute
                        Climb the stairs (my husband had the idea to put a sequence to this -- two steps up, one step back all the way to the top)
                        Sit-ups for 1 minute
                        Repeat
                        End with a series of stretching exercises (done with me) while classical music plays -- I needed to start a gentle stretching routine anyway! I wrote the specific stretch sequence on the back of his "Movement Time" card so I wouldn't forget them.

                        We'll do this routine before Opening and again around 3pm.

                        3. Changed the order of our school work

                        I'm going to split up C and H even though they're doing the same work. C will do FSR with me while H does XtraMath, then they'll switch. After that we'll do one of the movement/reading activities from the SC 1 plans (LOVE THESE!) and include E in those. Then we'll have our Bible/Catechism reading and discussion and end with the day's Enrichment activity.

                        His after school card has "Bear hug from Mom" and then he gets 30 minutes for the Montessori-based apps he loves (mapwork and sandpaper letters are his favorites). Then he has free play time until it's time to clean up for lunch.

                        So, that's the plan. Today was co-op day so we haven't really implemented anything yet. Hoping to keep it going on Mondays in the future, but we need to get into the groove with the changes first. We'll see how it goes!
                        Jennifer


                        2018-2019
                        DS-14 & DS-15 (MP9 Literature, Novare Intro to Physics, Light to the Nations I (CTP), MPOA for: Latin, Pre-Algebra, Ref/Con
                        DS-12 (6M)
                        DS-10 (SC3)
                        DD-8 (MP2)
                        DD-6 (SC2)
                        DD-3 (NT using SCB for gradual intro to JrK)

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Progress! and another question...

                          Your son sounds exactly like my 8 year old daughter! I would not be surprised if they were secretly collaborating on how to get out of doing school work! I have also had the problem about the materials being too young for an 8-year old. Clara has been able to read some of the Level 1 books from the library BETTER than she reads Fun in the Sun. She picked up Little Bear and Little Bear's Visit (both of which MP use for 1st grade), and had little trouble with them. The same child could not read the word "that" in one of the First Start Reading books, though. Now, obviously, the word "that" is used in Little Bear and Little Bear's Visit, and she can read it just fine in those books. Anyway, thank you for the post since I definitely want to keep following this thread.
                          JeJe Greer
                          Mom to:
                          Stella (6M in 2018-2019)
                          Clara (SC3 in 2018-2019)

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: Progress! and another question...

                            Originally posted by jen1134 View Post
                            Well, based on everyone's advice, here's what I did:

                            1. Mini-milestones/Visual checklists

                            I made a stack of index cards with each card focused on a specific segment of our day: Getting ready for the day, Getting ready for school, etc. and included little drawings for each item (he caught a few items that I forgot to do that with!) I then put the index cards into a plastic badge holder that clips to C's belt loop with a caribiner. He follows the flow on one card and then puts it to the back and can focus on the next card. I kept the number of things on each card to a minimum as much as possible.

                            2. Movement plan

                            I found a checklist for sensory avoidance/seeking and went through it with my husband and one of C's brothers. We found which sensory areas he avoids and which he seeks and I made a list from most avoided to least and most sought to least sought. I then used a Sensory Diet Activity list to choose items from the areas he generally seeks. (I still have to figure out how to address the avoidance ones). So his movement plan is:

                            Jump on a trampoline to a metronome beat (otherwise he gets too wound up) for 1 minute
                            Push-ups for 1 minute
                            Climb the stairs (my husband had the idea to put a sequence to this -- two steps up, one step back all the way to the top)
                            Sit-ups for 1 minute
                            Repeat
                            End with a series of stretching exercises (done with me) while classical music plays -- I needed to start a gentle stretching routine anyway! I wrote the specific stretch sequence on the back of his "Movement Time" card so I wouldn't forget them.

                            We'll do this routine before Opening and again around 3pm.

                            3. Changed the order of our school work

                            I'm going to split up C and H even though they're doing the same work. C will do FSR with me while H does XtraMath, then they'll switch. After that we'll do one of the movement/reading activities from the SC 1 plans (LOVE THESE!) and include E in those. Then we'll have our Bible/Catechism reading and discussion and end with the day's Enrichment activity.

                            His after school card has "Bear hug from Mom" and then he gets 30 minutes for the Montessori-based apps he loves (mapwork and sandpaper letters are his favorites). Then he has free play time until it's time to clean up for lunch.

                            So, that's the plan. Today was co-op day so we haven't really implemented anything yet. Hoping to keep it going on Mondays in the future, but we need to get into the groove with the changes first. We'll see how it goes!

                            Very good, Jen. Thank you for sharing this!

                            Cheryl

                            Comment

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