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We've had a lot going on. Tell me if I can make SC2 happen - or when

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    We've had a lot going on. Tell me if I can make SC2 happen - or when

    My father-in-law passed away a couple months ago and we've been dealing with our DS4's diagnosis of autism and the ensuing chaos that is trying to organize therapies, etc. I had originally looked at the SC2 core I had on my shelf and decided, "no way" (as in, I couldn't swing the amount of time the components would take). I absolutely did not think we could get it done. To add to everything, DS7 appeared to have lost a significant amount of phonics over the summer and we headed back into Dancing Bears.

    Because we're coming from a different phonics program (and, honestly, FSR simply didn't work well for him - we tried it), I'm not really sure WHEN he would be ready for SC2. I know there isn't a placement test for the reading, per se, but is there some place someone could point me that would tell me what I should look for when deciding when he might be ready for the reading SC2?
    We're finally getting to a place where I can maybe anticipate things settling down enough (maybe; hopefully) to do more than just phonics and math and, of course, I'd like to use the SC core I already have!

    #2
    Re: We've had a lot going on. Tell me if I can make SC2 happen - or when

    https://www.memoriapress.com/wp-cont...Assessment.pdf

    Hi Aimee,

    Above is a link to the level 2 readiness assessment. Hope that helps!
    Drew-- MP 1st
    Augustine-- Using consumables from SC B as prep for Jr. K
    Margot-- 2 years old
    Gregory-- 7 months old

    Comment


      #3
      Re: We've had a lot going on. Tell me if I can make SC2 happen - or when

      I have my SC2 guide open in my lap...

      I was very impressed with the Moose Moments readers assigned at the start of the year. The short vowell book is used for the first 2 weeks, reading a new story tag-team style every day. He reads a page, you read a page.

      The long vowell book, Silent E, is used for weeks 3 and 4.

      Week 5 is consonant digraphs. They then move into the 'At the Farm' book.

      So, I'm thinking your son needs to be pretty familiar with short vowells and silent e long vowells. The reading is too fast to be introduced to and master those concepts. My son picked up on digraphs pretty quick. I don't think he knew them before this course.

      We're on week 9 of SC2 and it says the child can read the assigned passages silently by theirself, but I honestly don't trust my son to do that successfully yet. So we're still tag-team reading and I don't see that changing anytime soon.

      I'm going to say he spends 3 hours on his schoolwork a day. He's usually done by lunch. He does the complete core as written except for a higher level math.

      Hopefully this helps gauge your son's readiness and your ability to have enough time to teach.
      Married to DH for 13 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

      DS10- Simply Classical 4 / Grade 3 Classic Core,
      DD8- Grade 2 Classic Core,
      DD 6- Classic Core Kindergarten

      Comment


        #4
        Re: We've had a lot going on. Tell me if I can make SC2 happen - or when

        Thanks!
        The program we're using is just an entirely different sequence, I think. He's very, very familiar with short vowels and silent "e," but their concentration is first vowel teams and two-letter digraphs... we haven't done much at all with consonant blends.
        I'm a bit confused about the assessment dictating a need for enjoyment of things like writing. He is very likely dyslexic like his older sister and has medical issues that make writing difficult and, at times, painful. He strongly dislikes writing (and may always, even though he is getting better "at" it, kwim?).
        He does great on the assessment - but for the consonant blends, which he is still shaky on.




        Originally posted by Colomama View Post
        I have my SC2 guide open in my lap...

        I was very impressed with the Moose Moments readers assigned at the start of the year. The short vowell book is used for the first 2 weeks, reading a new story tag-team style every day. He reads a page, you read a page.

        The long vowell book, Silent E, is used for weeks 3 and 4.

        Week 5 is consonant digraphs. They then move into the 'At the Farm' book.

        So, I'm thinking your son needs to be pretty familiar with short vowells and silent e long vowells. The reading is too fast to be introduced to and master those concepts. My son picked up on digraphs pretty quick. I don't think he knew them before this course.

        We're on week 9 of SC2 and it says the child can read the assigned passages silently by theirself, but I honestly don't trust my son to do that successfully yet. So we're still tag-team reading and I don't see that changing anytime soon.

        I'm going to say he spends 3 hours on his schoolwork a day. He's usually done by lunch. He does the complete core as written except for a higher level math.

        Hopefully this helps gauge your son's readiness and your ability to have enough time to teach.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: We've had a lot going on. Tell me if I can make SC2 happen - or when

          I'm thinking you could totally start SC2 given that info. If your guy picked up vowell teams, consonant blends would come next. I highly recommend the phonics flashcard set for this. IT allowed my son to connect a picture with the target sound. Hard and soft c for example.

          I will also say that you can plug FSR E in somewhere (or no where given his phonics history). it will be my son's first exposure to vowell teams. We will do FSR E before starting the Storytime Treasures. BUT given your son's early exposure to that concept I would think he could just start SC2 and follow it as written.

          As for the writing. My son dislikes it as well. Deeply deeply dislikes it. The SC writing is just perfect. It focuses on the mechanics of creating a good sentence through imitation. So, the child copies a sentence from the read aloud book (either Bible or enrichment). They learn to check it for basic rules like capitalization, complete thought, punctuation. They do 1 sentence a day. And that is enough for my guy.



          For other readers: it is recommended that students complete FSR E prior to starting SC2. It would usually be completed over the summer between terms. Due to family circumstances, we decided to complete it after finishing the first semester of SC2. For sure, the material in FSR E needs to be mastered before beginning Simply Classical Storytime Treasures.
          Last edited by Colomama; 10-21-2016, 10:40 PM.
          Married to DH for 13 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

          DS10- Simply Classical 4 / Grade 3 Classic Core,
          DD8- Grade 2 Classic Core,
          DD 6- Classic Core Kindergarten

          Comment


            #6
            Re: We've had a lot going on. Tell me if I can make SC2 happen - or when

            I wonder if I could see what FSR E covers without using the book. I had it on hand at one point and we tried it (along with the other FSR books), but he really doesn't do well with FSR in general

            DS' issue with reading is that he is far, far from fluent. He has his blends down... but he still sounds out (almost) every word in triplicate (he does have some sight words down). A relatively short story (as in, one page) can take him days to master. His stamina for reading is very low. It's been very hard for anyone to determine what is a learning difference vs. what is part of his medical "other" issues, so it's been difficult to decide where and how to remediate.

            Comment


              #7
              Re: We've had a lot going on. Tell me if I can make SC2 happen - or when

              Hi, Aimee.

              Did you teach FSR as written (student book/teacher guide), or did you include all of the MP plans? Or did you teach with the SC 1 multi-sensory FSR plans, (playdough, games, etc.) and phonogram cards? If not the latter, you might want to back up through SC 1 phonics/reading first. Isolate that subject, especially because your time is limited, and just teach this daily. You might be able to start with Books C and D. We could help you, so you would know what you needed.

              "Howiecram" did this successfully. Colomama taught her son through SC 1 phonics/reading before beginning SC 2 reading, as did Anita and others. The keys are the O-G progression and daily, incremental instruction with engagement beyond paper/pencil. FSR would not have "worked" for most of our students, if taught only as the student books. (Even the regular MP Core adds carefully created Phonogram Cards, word lists, and readers, along with suggested interactive games!) Just something to keep in mind.

              As for not enjoying writing and not reafing fluently, we work on both of these in SC 2. As Colomama says, we try to leave the student successful, skilled, and wanting more. This takes time.

              Right now your son (and you) have the hardest work of getting past labored decoding into true reading. No matter which good program you use, the steady daily-ness is essential.

              We're with you on this!

              Cheryl

              Comment


                #8
                Re: We've had a lot going on. Tell me if I can make SC2 happen - or when

                I did teach FSR as written with the teacher's guide, with phonogram cards added in (and the readers). It deviated so far from what he had been using that he made no progress with the FSR, so we moved back to Dancing Bears (which is also multi-sensory and uses phonogram cards; similar to how your plans make FSR multi-sensory). We are happy with the progress he's made in DB, but we aren't sure where or when he would fit into SC2, since it has a different sequence.


                Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
                Hi, Aimee.

                Did you teach FSR as written (student book/teacher guide), or did you include all of the MP plans? Or did you teach with the SC 1 multi-sensory FSR plans, (playdough, games, etc.) and phonogram cards? If not the latter, you might want to back up through SC 1 phonics/reading first. Isolate that subject, especially because your time is limited, and just teach this daily. You might be able to start with Books C and D. We could help you, so you would know what you needed.

                "Howiecram" did this successfully. Colomama taught her son through SC 1 phonics/reading before beginning SC 2 reading, as did Anita and others. The keys are the O-G progression and daily, incremental instruction with engagement beyond paper/pencil. FSR would not have "worked" for most of our students, if taught only as the student books. (Even the regular MP Core adds carefully created Phonogram Cards, word lists, and readers, along with suggested interactive games!) Just something to keep in mind.

                As for not enjoying writing and not reafing fluently, we work on both of these in SC 2. As Colomama says, we try to leave the student successful, skilled, and wanting more. This takes time.

                Right now your son (and you) have the hardest work of getting past labored decoding into true reading. No matter which good program you use, the steady daily-ness is essential.

                We're with you on this!

                Cheryl

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: We've had a lot going on. Tell me if I can make SC2 happen - or when

                  Then I agree with Colomama. ☺

                  You could start as soon as you would like!

                  He'll receive a review of short vowels and silent e in a different format that might help fluency, and he'll receive work with consonant blends.

                  He can also do SC 2 Writing. You might find that the writing program helps his reading. Bonus-- your 4yo could join the read-alouds.

                  Or ... you could continue DB for a while, perhaps through this semester, since you are happy with his progress, and begin SC 2 in January.

                  Do whatever gives him the most structure within a full language arts program for boosting all aspects of his reading (decoding, vocabulary, stories, beautiful language, writing) all together for greatest progress.


                  I'm sorry for the loss of your father-in-law. Mine also died a few months ago. Combined with the shock of your 4yo's diagnosis, it is no wonder you're needing to regroup.

                  I hope some of our input has been helpful. It may encourage you to know thar we have others who have come from other reading programs/progressions and have done well.

                  Comment

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