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4th Grade Girl using 3rd Moderated in Cottage School - Apparent Dysgraphia

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    4th Grade Girl using 3rd Moderated in Cottage School - Apparent Dysgraphia

    I teach a third/ fourth grade split class at a two day cottage school. Our class is working on the third grade moderated core curriculum (with grade level math and spelling substitutions). A fourth grade girl in my class is doing well in most of her subjects (Latin, Math, Literature). I am concerned because she cannot write words correctly for the spelling test. She gets maybe one out of twenty correct each week, and the spelling of the incorrect words is not close to correct or phonetic. I see her reviewing spelling cards and studying.

    What adaptions should I make for her? Oral spelling tests? Would phonics remediation be at all helpful? What sort of therapeutic options should her mother pursue?

    Anastasia Heder

    #2
    Re: 4th Grade Girl using 3rd Moderated in Cottage School - Apparent Dysgraphia

    Hi Anastasia,

    If she cannot spell the words after doing all the exercises and studying, my first thought would be educational testing for possible dyslexia, although with that you might expect to see difficulty with spelling the Latin vocabulary too. Does she have any trouble reading?

    The Spelling Workout books are all scheduled a year ahead in the MP LPs, so perhaps she just needs to go down a level in spelling. Is this her first year with MP?
    Catherine

    2019-20
    DS16, 10th
    DS13, 7th
    DS11, 6th
    DD11, 6th
    DS7, 1st
    DD4, JrK
    DS 17 mos

    Homeschooling 4 with MP
    2 in classical school

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      #3
      Re: 4th Grade Girl using 3rd Moderated in Cottage School - Apparent Dysgraphia

      I had a student once who failed every spelling test I gave, and he was dyslexic. But he could ace every Latin spelling test (which was a total confidence booster). He told me that because Latin has so many fewer sounds for each letter and the way each syllable is pronounced, he could hear the spelling in the Latin words.

      For English spelling, I just made him responsible for fewer words. He could generally learn 5 in a week, but not 20.

      Tanya

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        #4
        Re: 4th Grade Girl using 3rd Moderated in Cottage School - Apparent Dysgraphia

        Thanks, Tanya. That is a good idea. I will have her keep plugging away in her subjects, and reduce her spelling words to five.

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          #5
          Re: 4th Grade Girl using 3rd Moderated in Cottage School - Apparent Dysgraphia

          Originally posted by anastasia5 View Post
          I teach a third/ fourth grade split class at a two day cottage school. Our class is working on the third grade moderated core curriculum (with grade level math and spelling substitutions). A fourth grade girl in my class is doing well in most of her subjects (Latin, Math, Literature). I am concerned because she cannot write words correctly for the spelling test. She gets maybe one out of twenty correct each week, and the spelling of the incorrect words is not close to correct or phonetic. I see her reviewing spelling cards and studying.

          What adaptions should I make for her? Oral spelling tests? Would phonics remediation be at all helpful? What sort of therapeutic options should her mother pursue?

          Anastasia Heder

          Hi, Anastasia.

          Pardon my delay. My family enjoyed a few days of long-anticipated R&R.

          I appreciate your question. I especially like the three-fold components to your question: adaptations, remediation, therapeutic options.

          Yes, yes, and yes!


          Often classroom teachers are asked by parents to accommodate (i.e., make adaptations), and this can be enough for some students. For many others, adaptations may not address issues directly. For those students, your threefold plan is best:

          1. Adaptations
          Tanya suggested an effective way to do this. Also, if you think oral spelling tests would be helpful for her, this can be wonderful way to make spelling more efficient.

          2. Remediation
          Yes! If you can assign BRIEF daily phonics work based on her needs, this will be very good. Examples depend on the way she learns best and on her available support: spelling words she recites into a recorder, flash cards to be reviewed with a parent, letter beads to string according to each word, phonics/spelling rules to learn, other ideas, or all of the above. If you or another teacher can provide weekly after-school tutoring, this might be something to consider as well. True remediation can proceed more deeply after a good evaluation, which leads to ...

          3. Therapeutic intervention
          If this student has not yet been evaluated for specific learning disabilities, now is the time to suggest that her parents consider obtaining a good, thorough evaluation for their daughter to include intelligence testing, processing, and academic assessments. Even if this only rules out SLDs and uncovers specific strengths, this could benefit her tremendously. If disabilities in memory, processing, or learning are identified, such an evaluation should include recommendations for needed therapies, which the parents could pursue.



          Anastasia, your three-part question is the model we would love to see all classroom teachers ask!

          Thanks-
          Cheryl

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