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Spin off - What to do when kids want Latin, but aren't ready?

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    Spin off - What to do when kids want Latin, but aren't ready?

    Another post got me thinking ...... how do we/will we introduce Latin to our struggling learners/children with special needs?

    My daughter is 10 and entered into 2nd form a few weeks ago. My boys are 8, and working through the Barton Reading and Spelling system. (suspected dyslexia)
    While I was reviewing some of Rachel's Latin, Thomas piped up and said, "So, when are you going to teach us Latin?" His brother has been asking me as well.

    Here's the thing --- phonetically, I know they are not ready. Adding in the 'Latin vowels sound like this, while English verbs are like this" would be a huge issue.

    I'm going to start teaching myself with Prima Latina this year. Would teaching them Latin vocabulary - oral only- be a problem, or do I need to just cool my jets?
    Plans for 2019-20

    DD1 - 24 - College Grad and rocking her own bakery business
    DD2 - 13 - 8A Louisville HLS Cottage School and MPOA
    DS3 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
    DS4 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
    DD5 - 7 - MP2, Louisville HLS Cottage School
    DS6 - 5 - MP K

    [url]www.thekennedyadventures.com/all-about-our-memoria-press-homeschool[/url]

    #2
    Re: Spin off - What to do when kids want Latin, but aren't ready?

    Hi, Dianna.

    This is the year of reading for your boys. They MUST grow in reading/spelling skills this year. "First things first." I would not take away from the boys' intensive reading/phonics/spelling time to teach Latin this year, even orally. Nothing is more important this year, based on everything you have shared about them.

    However, their desire to learn Latin is wonderful to hear! They WANT to learn. You have created this desire, even by your own embarking on Prima. Good for you! You can tap into this by making Latin an incentive. Your answer can be, "As soon as you can ...." Then fill in the blank with a phonics/reading goal, such as, "read the StoryTime Treasures books on your own," or "finish this year of phonics/reading lessons." You could make a celebration of the goal completion by beginning Latin!


    But ...
    IF you can find a fun way to enrich your word studies with oral Latin vocabulary without neglecting phonics/reading/spelling instruction in any way, this could be exciting for you and the boys as a joint venture. You could play the Prima CD in the car or at home for practice, if this seems to be enjoyable for them. It can build word power. But again, you would want to do this ONLY if this is truly adding (i.e., not distracting or procrastinating) from your first and most important task: devoting daily hard work to teaching them to read and spell this year.

    First things first for the year, and first things first each day: a good lesson in itself!

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Spin off - What to do when kids want Latin, but aren't ready?

      Dianna and I are so similar. We are looking down the road trying to prepare for any/everything. It makes me laugh sometimes. I started a thread over in K-8 (because my 6 yo daughter is passing my 8 yo son in reading and phonics) and I already have her 2nd grade year planned before she's even started 1st!

      First
      Things
      First

      Thank you for the reminder, Cheryl
      Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
      Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
      Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
      Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

      “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
      ~Pope St John Paul II

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Spin off - What to do when kids want Latin, but aren't ready?

        My 8-year-old is working through Barton as well. He's my second child to go through it. I'd actually given my levels away and had to re-buy them, if you can imagine. I just never thought I'd be doing this whole dyslexia gig again.

        Having said that, I do a lot of oral Latin at this stage--no grammar, mostly prayers/chants. We don't worry about formal pronunciation rules, spelling or reading; (we save all that for English!) we just recite. Both of my dyslexics have wonderful aural memories. I think it's a survival skill!

        In our particular faith (Catholic) the children hear some of the prayers that they've learned during Lent. I wish they heard them in church more often. We make the sign of the cross in Latin and say before dinner prayers in Latin. I teach things that they already know in English-- Glory Be, Agnus Dei, Sanctus, Our Father, etc.

        I think it's given my struggling readers a sense of accomplishment, which is important around here when reading just doesn't come naturally at all.

        In my experience (dyslexia is fairly severe here) Latin can still be studied formally, but it may need to be started later and take a slower pace. It may never reach the level of the non-dyslexic or the mild dyslexic, but there is still a great deal to be gained from it.
        Gina
        Honored & Blessed to be teaching my children at home
        (since 2001)

        DS-sophomore in college
        DD-soon-to-be college freshman!
        DD-9
        DS-8

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Spin off - What to do when kids want Latin, but aren't ready?

          Gigi,

          GREAT idea! Yes, memorizing spoken prayers and liturgical elements found in Prima Latina and Latina Christiana would be excellent, even during early phonics instruction. Similarly, we enjoyed the sacred music sung in Latin on the Lingua Angelica CD, even before we conjugated and declined.

          And, yes, we are most certainly proponents of teaching formal Latin after phonics, even with students who struggle with language and learning. Here are more thoughts on this topic.


          My own children benefited from the study of Latin in measurable (and immeasurable) ways through formal Latin instruction, Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child.

          Even today, post-graduation, my daughter wants to continue in her Latin class with me.


          Thank you for this -

          Cheryl

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Spin off - What to do when kids want Latin, but aren't ready?

            Cheryl, I remember the inspiring stories of your children and Latin in Simply Classical...(one of my all-time favorite homeschool books!)
            It is a truly wonderful thing to help a child reach their full potential.

            Our church sings Adeste Fideles on Christmas Eve, so that's a fun thing to work on during November/December!
            Gina
            Honored & Blessed to be teaching my children at home
            (since 2001)

            DS-sophomore in college
            DD-soon-to-be college freshman!
            DD-9
            DS-8

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Spin off - What to do when kids want Latin, but aren't ready?

              I Speak Latin may be a nice addition for you and your boys. I may try it with my 4 and 7 year olds (both special needs), for no reason other than "fun." It's more "conversational" and vocabulary than anything else (or, you could easily make it more conversational).

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Spin off - What to do when kids want Latin, but aren't ready?

                Originally posted by cherylswope View Post

                This is the year of reading for your boys. They MUST grow in reading/spelling skills this year. "First things first." I would not take away from the boys' intensive reading/phonics/spelling time to teach Latin this year, even orally. Nothing is more important this year, based on everything you have shared about them.

                However, their desire to learn Latin is wonderful to hear! They WANT to learn. You have created this desire, even by your own embarking on Prima. Good for you! You can tap into this by making Latin an incentive. Your answer can be, "As soon as you can ...." Then fill in the blank with a phonics/reading goal, such as, "read the StoryTime Treasures books on your own," or "finish this year of phonics/reading lessons." You could make a celebration of the goal completion by beginning Latin!


                But ...
                IF you can find a fun way to enrich your word studies with oral Latin vocabulary without neglecting phonics/reading/spelling instruction in any way, this could be exciting for you and the boys as a joint venture. You could play the Prima CD in the car or at home for practice, if this seems to be enjoyable for them. It can build word power. But again, you would want to do this ONLY if this is truly adding (i.e., not distracting or procrastinating) from your first and most important task: devoting daily hard work to teaching them to read and spell this year.

                First things first for the year, and first things first each day: a good lesson in itself!

                As a reminder to myself as much as to anyone else, lest we undo decades of Mrs. Lowe's hard work, the above should remain our primary answer to Dianna.

                I say this because I made a mistake with my two, when we substituted "fun" for "necessary." (SO much more fun to create world-culture crafts than to persevere in the foundations of reading, spelling, writing, and arithmetic!)

                Everything in its place. Even Latin can be a siren song, if it deters us from our focus in those primary skills.

                It was not until we began modeling the SC Curriculum after the MP Classical Core that I fully realized the wisdom of spending the primary years on primary skills. (Our grandparents knew this. We forgot!) See The Schools We Need and Why We Don't Have Them for fascinating background. I'm finally reading this book! Grammar School, in which Latin is taught, begins after the primary, foundational skills are in place.

                See also Mrs. Lowe's "3 Methods of Teaching Latin" and her article about immersion/discovery learning, The Natural Method is Not Natural.


                Dianna,
                To answer your other question as it relates to SC, we introduce Latin through an SC Intro to Prima Latina the second semester of SC 3, the last of our SC Primary levels, as MP does in MP 2. Then we begin full-force with Prima Latina in SC 4, the first of our Grammar levels. By then, our students will be reading, spelling, and writing simple sentences with greater automaticity in English, "primed" for studying Prima Latina.

                Thanks-
                Cheryl

                Comment

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