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Simply Classical and Deaf Education

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    Simply Classical and Deaf Education

    Hi all,

    Is anyone using Simply Classical with a child who is deaf?

    Thanks!

    #2
    Re: Simply Classical and Deaf Education

    Welcome!

    How old is your child?

    We have some who are teaching children with hearing impairments. Others teach "nonverbal" or minimally verbal children who communicate with sign language, PECs, picture communication boards, and other adaptations for language impairments.


    If you are interested, we can try to help with your situation. If you have not yet read the preface to Simply Classical, I think you will find it encouraging. The preface is available for free within this expanded book sample here.


    Thanks-
    Cheryl

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      #3
      Re: Simply Classical and Deaf Education

      Thanks! She is 8 years old. We adopted her last year. I have classically educated my other children and would love support from other parents who are in the same boat...or close to it!

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Simply Classical and Deaf Education

        Here is a way to connect you quickly to others in somewhat similar circumstances. This is not to overwhelm, but only to share what has been shared here, in case something here is relevant or encouraging.


        Number 1 -- This is about an adopted 8yo girl who is blind.

        Number 2 -- This one includes augmented communication and adaptations for the Simply Classical Curriculum.

        Number 3 -- This one is especially touching related to the power of visual, sacred art in the life of a child who cannot speak.

        Number 4 -- This discussion is about an adopted child with a hearing impairment, and follow-up with the same child: Number 5.


        You might also enjoy this article with video:

        The Joy of Knowing


        Thanks-
        Cheryl

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Simply Classical and Deaf Education

          Yes and no

          My 14 year old adopted daughter is deaf (moderate-sloping-to-profound bilateral hearing impaired) and we're slowly incorporating more MP stuff. By next year I hope to begin her in Simply Classical 4 because right now she's just ahead of Level 2 so that one isn't as useful for us.

          Our biggest struggle hands-down is vocabulary and language. It's just such a struggle. My daughter was not diagnosed until 8 and never taught sign language and didn't come to us until 3 years ago. She doesn't want to learn sign language and it's been difficult to even find a class even assuming we could convince her to go. So for now we plow through with her hearing aids and lip-reading skills and are trying to get her reading to a point where she can start learning new vocabulary from the written word. She was reading at a 1st grade level in 5th grade so we pulled her out to homeschool and I've been tutoring her with Orton-Gillingham, which works well for her. Now she's up to a 4th grade decoding level and 2nd grade comprehension level in reading.

          Anyway, if you want to chat feel free to message me! This board is also amazing! Even though there aren't many parents of deaf children here the fact that everyone on the SC board is working around other learning challenges means they're good at thinking outside the box. And I think the Simply Classical stuff would be a perfect fit for a young deaf child! I'd check out the pre-assessments and see where you think she'd fit best and don't ever feel like going back to the beginning is a waste, especially with an adopted child! Start easy and build her confidence and yours. Also, if you could sign along with the stories that would be ideal!

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Simply Classical and Deaf Education

            Originally posted by imagine.more View Post
            Yes and no

            My 14 year old adopted daughter is deaf (moderate-sloping-to-profound bilateral hearing impaired) and we're slowly incorporating more MP stuff. By next year I hope to begin her in Simply Classical 4 because right now she's just ahead of Level 2 so that one isn't as useful for us.

            Our biggest struggle hands-down is vocabulary and language. It's just such a struggle. My daughter was not diagnosed until 8 and never taught sign language and didn't come to us until 3 years ago. She doesn't want to learn sign language and it's been difficult to even find a class even assuming we could convince her to go. So for now we plow through with her hearing aids and lip-reading skills and are trying to get her reading to a point where she can start learning new vocabulary from the written word. She was reading at a 1st grade level in 5th grade so we pulled her out to homeschool and I've been tutoring her with Orton-Gillingham, which works well for her. Now she's up to a 4th grade decoding level and 2nd grade comprehension level in reading.

            Anyway, if you want to chat feel free to message me! This board is also amazing! Even though there aren't many parents of deaf children here the fact that everyone on the SC board is working around other learning challenges means they're good at thinking outside the box. And I think the Simply Classical stuff would be a perfect fit for a young deaf child! I'd check out the pre-assessments and see where you think she'd fit best and don't ever feel like going back to the beginning is a waste, especially with an adopted child! Start easy and build her confidence and yours. Also, if you could sign along with the stories that would be ideal!
            My son's first language was ASL. He is not hearing impaired but could not speak until he'd passed his fifth birthday. We used Signing Time videos to learn ASL. They incorporate songs, movement and basic signs all the way up to short conversational phrases. The woman who created it, Rachel Coleman, has a daughter who is profoundly deaf and another one with cerebral palsy. So the videos came out of her own need to educate her extended family in ASL. They sound a bit young for your daughter, but you could give the later volumes a shot. They are more complex and geared towards older kids.

            Rachel Coleman also gave an interview where she brought up the importance of ASL, reading, writing and "over-communication" for deaf children. She said the majority of deaf children do poorly in vocabulary, language expression, etc because they are not exposed to enough immersive language . Children without hearing impairment absorb language from their surroundings. They cannot tune it out. It's everywhere -- in their homes, on tv, at the grocery store, on the radio, at church, at school -- there is nowhere they can go where language is not heard. So when that "hearing" is not present, language and vocabulary stay in a state of arrested development. It's not that deaf children cannot learn (as we've seen from people like Helen Keller), it's that they need accommodation to do so.

            I'm sure that as a mom of a child with hearing impairment, you are already well aware of this. But it honestly had never ever occurred to me before. Wow! You have your work cut out for you.

            I suspect that as your daughter engages the vocabulary-rich environment of classical education that her vocabulary and language skills will blossom. I think if you can instill a love of language and reading in her that she will take off and likely surpass your expectations on this front. You're in the right place!
            Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
            Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
            Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
            Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

            “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
            ~Pope St John Paul II

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Simply Classical and Deaf Education

              Ah, Signing Times DVDs. Memories memories. My son and I worked through them. We knew around a hundred signs, easy. During his early assessments I was told his knowledge and use of sign language was what prevented the autism label from being attached to him. It showed he wanted to communicate. I still get all misty when I see those videos.
              Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

              DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
              DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
              DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

              We've completed:
              Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
              Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Simply Classical and Deaf Education

                Originally posted by Colomama View Post
                Ah, Signing Times DVDs. Memories memories. My son and I worked through them. We knew around a hundred signs, easy. During his early assessments I was told his knowledge and use of sign language was what prevented the autism label from being attached to him. It showed he wanted to communicate. I still get all misty when I see those videos.
                "Do you know the colors of our rainbow?
                Do you know the colors of our rainbow?
                There's red, orange, yellow, green, purple and blue."
                (Clap, clap, clap, clap)
                "Do you know the colors of our rainbow too?"

                (Sticks in your brain like a railroad spike, no?)

                We donated all our videos to a family whose 6th child had embryonic cancer. He presented his first brain tumor at one year old. As a result of the cancer, surgery, and chemo, he was left hearing impaired and mentally delayed. My kids were taking by then, so we hadn't watched the videos in a long time. He passed away about a year ago, but his mom still appreciates Signing Time.

                Remind me what your son's Dx is? Our boys are the same age and both doing SC2 this year. I feel like I should know this... (Please don't smack me )
                Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
                Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
                Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
                Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

                “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
                ~Pope St John Paul II

                Comment

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