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Intro to Cursive for Special Needs and Struggling Students

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    Intro to Cursive for Special Needs and Struggling Students

    We now have all of the components available for the new SC Intro to Cursive program for struggling students and students with special learning needs.



    Thanks to Iris Hatfield and MP, you need only three items:

    1) NAC 1
    2) NAC Cursive Practice Sheets
    3) Simply Classical Cursive lesson plans (Scroll nearly all the way down the page to "Simply Classical Level 2 Cursive Lesson Plans Buy Digital $5.00 Buy Print $6.00"). With those plans, you receive multimodal instruction methods, scheduling, and tips with daily plans for 34 weeks. Teach exactly as written or proceed at your own pace.


    NOTE: Anyone ordering SC 2 automatically receives all three items with the curriculum package.


    When your child has learned all of the NAC letters, upper and lowercase, consider Simply Classical Copybook Cursive (green book) for meaningful practice.

    Find free samples through the above links.


    Still "on the fence" about cursive? Consider this archived post.


    Thanks-
    Cheryl


    ClassicalSpecialNeeds.com

    #2
    Re: Intro to Cursive for Special Needs and Struggling Students

    Cheryl,
    What would you recommend for cursive help for my fifth grader? We have been working on cursive since 3rd grade with him, but it (and his manuscript and numbers) are still very messy. We have worked on penmanship basically every day.

    Is there anything to do other than just keep practicing it? With my other kids practice improves their writing, but not yet with him. Although he writes better in his handwriting book than elsewhere, I do worry that all the writing he does in the other books (Latin, math, grammar etc--which adds up to a lot more than the penmanship practice) reinforces the messiness.
    Catherine

    2021-22
    DS18, 12th
    DS15, 9th
    DS & DD13, 8th
    DS9, 3rd
    DD6, 1st
    DS3
    DS & DS due in Sept

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Intro to Cursive for Special Needs and Struggling Students

      I forgot to mention this--the reason I tagged onto this post was to ask if you feel like these materials are more helpful than Handwriting without Tears, which is what I have always used.
      Catherine

      2021-22
      DS18, 12th
      DS15, 9th
      DS & DD13, 8th
      DS9, 3rd
      DD6, 1st
      DS3
      DS & DS due in Sept

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Intro to Cursive for Special Needs and Struggling Students

        Originally posted by CatherineS View Post
        Cheryl,
        What would you recommend for cursive help for my fifth grader? We have been working on cursive since 3rd grade with him, but it (and his manuscript and numbers) are still very messy. We have worked on penmanship basically every day.

        Is there anything to do other than just keep practicing it? With my other kids practice improves their writing, but not yet with him. Although he writes better in his handwriting book than elsewhere, I do worry that all the writing he does in the other books (Latin, math, grammar etc--which adds up to a lot more than the penmanship practice) reinforces the messiness.

        Hi, Catherine.

        I think you answered your own question. With a neurological tendency toward impulsivity (e.g., rushing through schoolwork), he is likely "practicing" messy writing every day!

        The question is how to stop this. You have several options, especially because he does evidence the ability to write more neatly in his penmanship books.

        -Require neat writing in his homework.
        Create a simple scale of minimum acceptability. Something like this:
        1) Letter formation
        2) Letter size
        3) Overall legibility
        4) Minimal erasures
        5) Spacing between words

        You can grade daily or just take samples. Rate with a number system or words, such as: unacceptable, satisfactory, exceptional.
        Grade each skill, just as you grade the content. If unacceptable in 3 of 5, the paper must be redone.


        -Switch programs.
        This responds to your P.S.
        Given his age and his bright, creative leanings, it might be time to introduce something new. Have you seen this?
        Teach Yourself Cursive: Create a Cursive that Fits You. Promote the creative individualistic aspects of Teach Yourself Cursive, with an appeal to his imaginative leanings. He might even enjoy it!


        -Combine switching programs with raising expectations.
        As with a January 1 resolution, this new program could provide a "Restart" to introducing the expectation of good writing in ALL of his school work.


        -Introduce typing.
        As he begins to write papers and have other non-workbook writing, you can let him know that you respect the fact that he is nearing middle school. Tell him that after he has practiced this new program and clearly integrated it into his everyday school work, you plan to allow him to type his papers.


        Some would jump to the last option, even without working on cursive! Here is some additional inspiration for making the effort to improve his own writing:
        A Note from Iris Hatfield


        For this particular student, based on what you have shared elsewhere, one key is most likely rather simple: slow down. My daughter is similar. Her handwriting can be stunningly beautiful, or it can be scratched in hurried, illegible marks across the page, upside down and sideways. But when she really wants to sign her name neatly, as on a recent job application (!), she just slows wayyyy down. She knows she needs to. (Btw, she got the job! )



        You already know it is time for a change. You can select any or all of the above options, or create your own, but it is time for him to stop practicing bad habits and start creating new ones.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Intro to Cursive for Special Needs and Struggling Students

          Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
          (Btw, she got the job! )
          Congratulations to her!

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Intro to Cursive for Special Needs and Struggling Students

            Thank you, Michael. Michelle is beaming. She stands at least a foot taller now.

            The nursing home where she volunteered the past 3-4 years accepted her request when she entered the director's office on her own, closed the door behind her, and made this plea:

            I've been volunteering here once a week for several years. I love the residents. It would be an honor for me to work here as your employee, if you have an opening.


            It chokes me up just thinking of her courage. She now works 11am-3pm on the one day when she previously volunteered 2-3pm. Such a small difference for most, but not for her.

            Her own paycheck. She just keeps saying, "I have a JOB!"

            The director made this happen for her, and Michelle truly does love the residents. We could not be more grateful.

            ,,,


            This speaks to Dr. Temple Grandin's repeated urging to have teens with special needs volunteer as soon as you find a willing, capable adult to oversee them.



            But now back to cursive ....


            Feel free to follow up, Catherine.

            Cheryl

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Intro to Cursive for Special Needs and Struggling Students

              That is wonderful, Cheryl!

              I will check out the book you mentioned. He is finally wanting to improve his handwriting, so this may be a great way for him to regroup.

              Thanks again,
              Catherine

              2021-22
              DS18, 12th
              DS15, 9th
              DS & DD13, 8th
              DS9, 3rd
              DD6, 1st
              DS3
              DS & DS due in Sept

              Comment

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