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This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

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Readiness Assessment Results

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    Readiness Assessment Results

    Hi Cheryl, Some friends suggested that I write to you. We did not use Memoria Press for school for my youngest daughter for kindergarten and 1st grade. I planned to put her into Memoria Press 1st grade. We have all of the required components. However, I began looking at the material in the spring and realized it would be too hard for my daughter. I asked some questions here and in the FaceBook group. That, coupled with discovering that my daughter has dyslexia, made me decide I should go back and start Simply Classical 1. I gave her the readiness assessment, and she passes it at 100% so I thought all was good. I have the whole curriculum minus 3 read-aloud or science books now. Yesterday evening I was looking over the website again and saw that there is a readiness assessment for Simply Classical 2 on the curriculum page for it (it is not on the "Where Do I Start?" Special Needs page). I went through that assessment and my daughter's scores are Language 15/1/0, Cognitive Ability 10/2/0, Social-Emotional Development 10/1/0, Fine Motor Skills 15/0/0, 13/0/0. This means that of the 67 skills there are only 4 that are emerging, and the rest are completed. I think that this means that I should have her in Simply Classical 2. I (obviously) have all of the First Start Reading books. Part of the reason I thought that she needed to be in Simply Classical 1 is because there are some reading concepts in FSR books A-D that she has not mastered. She has been taught all of them, but some are not sinking in. She is fine with any CVC words with any letters as long as they are 3 letters. She knows a number of blends, but not all of them. As I look at the assessment section of FSR A-D she has definitely covered everything in those books (although she may not remember all of it), but she will flip out if I ask her to read something as long as Val the Vet on page 57 of FSR C. So I guess I would say she has learned it, but has not retained all of it. She cannot sit still and read for longer than 10 minutes without getting extremely agitated. Despite 2 years of teaching her and having a private reading tutor, the only thing that we can say for sure is that she can read 3-letter CVC words (and words she likes such as princess, dragon, dinosaur, etc.). She also enjoys doing things like playing TeachYourMonsterToRead.com (she is at the very end of level 2 of the game and I could give you her % scores for each of the phonemes there). Do you think that we should be moving on to Simply Classical 2 or just starting all over again with Simply Classical 1? Oh, I should mention that Clara is great with math and is moving onto 2nd grade Math-U-See without any problems. It is only the reading that is worrying us. Thank you for your help.
    Last edited by jejegreer; 07-27-2016, 05:05 PM. Reason: forgot to mention math skills
    JeJe Greer
    Mom to:
    Stella (7M)
    Clara (SC)

    #2
    Re: Readiness Assessment Results

    Hello!

    We have had several moms here with the same dilemma, and the solution seems to be this:

    Teach through SC 1 thoroughly, but at a slightly accelerated pace. This will accomplish several things. First, you will fill any gaps in phonics instruction. Second, you will improve reading fluency. Perhaps most importantly, you will help her feel confident as a reader!

    The SC 1 FSR reading plans give you mulitimodal (i.e., fun) methods for reviewing concepts, sounds, and skills. You would likely race through FSR A without needing these, but use them anyway, if you can. This will make B, C, and D more successful.

    After you teach through SC 1, you have the optional 8-week review included with your SC 1 manual, or you may proceed directly to SC 2.

    As for math, simply substitute your preferred math. All is customizable, so you can order without math.


    When you order SC 1, you can order only the reading by purchasing Individual Lesson Plans, or you can order the entire level (minus math, if preferred). See the "Customize" button for pricing options.

    If you have any questions at all, you can follow up here, or call the genuinely friendly MP office staff for answers.



    Does that help?

    Cheryl

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Readiness Assessment Results

      Yes and no. My daughter will be 8 in September so if she can do SC2 it is much more important than for a 6-year old to be able to go further. Does this mean that the readiness assessment for SC2 is not correct, or that my child is just way behind? If the latter, which is quite possible, do you have any kind of accelerated lesson plan I can use? I have obviously failed miserably at teaching reading, and don't want to keep Clara back when she could be in 3rd grade in my state. She is not dumb. She can already do multiplication skip counting and she retains everything that is not reading. I know that your curriculum recommends reading 3rd grade books aloud if they are too hard for the child to read alone. We use your curriculum for my older daughter who is way above grade level so it is easy for her. This curriculum would be easy for Clara if she could read. I cannot believe that we have a daughter with a learning disability like dyslexia, and have read your book. I still feel it is my fault since I must have done things like eat deli meat while pregnant. How do I ever make this up to her if I do not get her to the right grade level in time?
      JeJe Greer
      Mom to:
      Stella (7M)
      Clara (SC)

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Readiness Assessment Results

        Originally posted by jejegreer View Post
        Yes and no. My daughter will be 8 in September so if she can do SC2 it is much more important than for a 6-year old to be able to go further. Does this mean that the readiness assessment for SC2 is not correct, or that my child is just way behind? If the latter, which is quite possible, do you have any kind of accelerated lesson plan I can use? I have obviously failed miserably at teaching reading, and don't want to keep Clara back when she could be in 3rd grade in my state. She is not dumb. She can already do multiplication skip counting and she retains everything that is not reading. I know that your curriculum recommends reading 3rd grade books aloud if they are too hard for the child to read alone. We use your curriculum for my older daughter who is way above grade level so it is easy for her. This curriculum would be easy for Clara if she could read. I cannot believe that we have a daughter with a learning disability like dyslexia, and have read your book. I still feel it is my fault since I must have done things like eat deli meat while pregnant. How do I ever make this up to her if I do not get her to the right grade level in time?
        First, you need a great big hug! Next, sit down, take a deep breath and remember that in homeschool there is no behind. We meet the child where he/she is at, and not at our expectations! In special needs kids, we may even need to take them further back! Reading is a foundational skill, that should not have holes or gaps in it. We continue at the child's speed. This may mean doing FSR A in 3 days, FSR B in a week and a half, then stalling around C or D and taking longer than the lesson plans suggests.

        It is evident you love your daughter, that is what she needs. Honestly, even if you could prove "you" did something, there is no since dweling on it! You know she is dyslexic, so you can move forward, maybe by taking a few steps back. Have you seen the American Girl movie "Mackenna"? (Not a fan of American Girl, but during a bout of on the couch illness (including multiple kids throwing up feverish, we watched a lot of TV). Anyway, it is about a 4th grade elite gymnast. She has a reading problem and gets a child tutor. The tutor starts her out with books "my little Kindergarten sisters" can read. The foundation is so important! If you stick with SC1, just do that for phonics right now. You can move at her pace. Do not worry about the rest of the subjects not lining up neatly. If you have MP1, do MP1 for everything but phonics, move forward with your math program and sit back and watch both of you grow in confidence!

        In SC1 phonics, I would encourage you to read through the first 8 weeks or so. Do all the "activities" and see what she responds to. Also, make sure to read the phonics A to Z book! I literally spent a year not understanding that MP does not teach CVC words (they sure looked like that to me!!). They actually teach word families. The next thing the book said is the best strategy for reading is teaching blending, but then seeing words in sentences and then dictation. This is exactly how FSR is laid out! Wow, I did not even see that until I read that! DUH!!! It makes so much more sense now! So, for book A I did almost everything, but included dictation through word lists and short sentences. This worked until book C, where we hit a wall and I had to slow down and quit the sentences.

        I am sorry my thoughts are scattered. I wanted to send a message, but we are headed out the door! I think I had a few other thoughts! I will pop back on later if I think of them ! You love your daughter! Do not worry about "keeping her on grade level"! :-)
        Christine

        (2019/2020)
        DD1 8/23/09 - SC5/6
        DS2 9/1/11 - SC3,4, 5/6 combo
        DD3 2/9/13 -SC2 to start, MP1 second semester

        Previous Years
        DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4’
        DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2)
        DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK)

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Readiness Assessment Results

          I will quickly echo and reinforce agreement with Cheryl and Christine. You have not failed miserably. This is not your fault. Your daughter has dyslexia -- it is not preventable and nothing you "did" or didn't do caused it. If anything, your daughter's giftedness at Math highlights the probable reason -- her brain is wired for Math at the "expense" of reading. This seems to be quite common in children who have dyslexia. They are above grade-level at Math and a few grade-levels behind in reading -- I've read this from moms here and elsewhere many times. So no self-immolation Your daughter is going to be just fine.

          SC1 is where I would start, for exactly the reasons Cheryl listed. My primary reason would be as a confidence-builder for your daughter. Right now, reading is frustrating for her. If you begin at the beginning with "easy stuff" she goes in with the expectation that she CAN rather than she can't. First Start Reading is a wonderful program. She will master reading through its use. Present it in terms of "learning to read with a new program" rather than "a baby program" or (worst of all) "the program we have to use because (fill in the blank)." The latter is just self-defeating. You can do this!

          SC1 with a customizable Math component would be the best route. When you're finished, move on to SC2 with a customized Math. No biggie. The better her foundation, the faster she will master reading. Grade levels are an approximation only. Not everyone "fits" neatly in them -- Einstein certainly didn't. So don't stress, okay?

          HTH!
          Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
          Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
          Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
          Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

          “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
          ~Pope St John Paul II

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Readiness Assessment Results

            jejegreer,

            Your daughter's SC 2 assessment results indicate that she has strong cognitive, language, social/emotional and fine-motor skills. This is excellent. This may allow her to move directly to MP 1 or SC 3, rather than SC 2, when you finish SC 1! You can reassess when the time comes. In the meantime, I agree with you about beginning in SC 1, because of the need to teach her to read well. The other components of SC 1 will only enhance her education, not slow her down, while you teach her.


            This information is very important from your initial post:

            Part of the reason I thought that she needed to be in Simply Classical 1 is because there are some reading concepts in FSR books A-D that she has not mastered. She has been taught all of them, but some are not sinking in. She is fine with any CVC words with any letters as long as they are 3 letters. She knows a number of blends, but not all of them. As I look at the assessment section of FSR A-D she has definitely covered everything in those books (although she may not remember all of it), but she will flip out if I ask her to read something as long as Val the Vet on page 57 of FSR C. So I guess I would say she has learned it, but has not retained all of it. She cannot sit still and read for longer than 10 minutes without getting extremely agitated.


            We do not have accelerated plans. Each child is different, but you can follow Christine's (howiecram's) suggestions. She learned these through her own experience! Just go all the way back to the beginning and move forward through A and B, as long as she masters everything. These will probably go quickly for her, and you can establish a good teaching rhythm.

            During this time, you might want to follow this tip to avoid fatigue:
            Teach the phonics lessons separately. You will work on learning and remembering the phonics skills at this time. Then set aside a different time in the day for her own oral reading. You will want a comfortable side-by-side place for this. Be sure to notice her improvement out loud. "Last time you read out loud for 6 minutes. Today you read out loud for 8 minutes!" Or you might say, "Yesterday you read one story by yourself. Today you read two!" Keep noticing her improvements out loud. Your secondary goal (or perhaps primary!) will be changing discouragement to encouragement through SC 1.

            If you notice fatigue in her oral reading, jump in with, "I'll take this page." By alternating pages, you will model fluency, inflection, and engagement with the story.


            Because you already own nearly all of SC 1, I would teach from the entire level. We include many components (e.g., recitations, Christian studies, art, music, literature, and science) not typically found in early-reading programs! This will stretch her fund of knowledge, even while you strengthen her reading. Utilize the comprehension questions, art study, and more. The recitations target working memory. All will work together for her good. At 8, she is still young enough to benefit from all of this, yet bright enough to be engaged by the content!


            A hidden question seems to be one many of us ask: "Why!?" ("Was it something I did?" "Was it something I failed to do?") For in-depth answers, you might consider a full evaluation. Evaluations can uncover far more than just dyslexia. Subtle difficulties with memory, visual perception, and even auditory processing can interfere with reading. A good evaluation will help you, so you can help your daughter. Many areas can be addressed or accommodated to help her learn more efficiently. You can bring with you this good information you shared here: She is bright, capable in math, and having difficulties with reading despite her chronological age, tutoring, and much effort expended in teaching her to read.


            Begin with SC 1. (If needed, review the sections on Instructional vs. Frustration levels in your copy of Simply Classical. We now have a webinar on this too.) Even though many of her skills fall at the SC 2 level, her difficulties with reading trump this. Nothing is more important than helping her learn to read well right now. SC 1 gives you the tools to help her do this in an enjoyable, literature-rich, and engaging way.


            Feel free to follow up --

            Cheryl

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Readiness Assessment Results

              Originally posted by Anita View Post
              I will quickly echo and reinforce agreement with Cheryl and Christine. You have not failed miserably. This is not your fault. Your daughter has dyslexia -- it is not preventable and nothing you "did" or didn't do caused it. If anything, your daughter's giftedness at Math highlights the probable reason -- her brain is wired for Math at the "expense" of reading. This seems to be quite common in children who have dyslexia. They are above grade-level at Math and a few grade-levels behind in reading -- I've read this from moms here and elsewhere many times. So no self-immolation Your daughter is going to be just fine.

              SC1 is where I would start, for exactly the reasons Cheryl listed. My primary reason would be as a confidence-builder for your daughter. Right now, reading is frustrating for her. If you begin at the beginning with "easy stuff" she goes in with the expectation that she CAN rather than she can't. First Start Reading is a wonderful program. She will master reading through its use. Present it in terms of "learning to read with a new program" rather than "a baby program" or (worst of all) "the program we have to use because (fill in the blank)." The latter is just self-defeating. You can do this!

              SC1 with a customizable Math component would be the best route. When you're finished, move on to SC2 with a customized Math. No biggie. The better her foundation, the faster she will master reading. Grade levels are an approximation only. Not everyone "fits" neatly in them -- Einstein certainly didn't. So don't stress, okay?

              HTH!
              I had a response here as well, and the forum ate my post. (it was actually down for a bit ---aaack)

              I think there's a bit of grieving that goes along with a learning disability diagnosis. You may need some time to just decompress and stew in this a bit, before jumping in with both feet.

              I completely agree with Anita --- building confidence, especially with kids with learning issues, is VITAL.
              Plans for 2020-21

              Year 10 of homeschooling with MP

              DD1 - 25 - Out of the nest, small business owner
              DD2 - 14 - 9th grade Cottage School Diploma Program/MPOA
              DS3 - 12 - 5A Cottage School
              DS4 - 12 - 5A Cottage School
              DD5 - 8 - 3A, Cottage School
              DS6 - 6 - MP K

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Readiness Assessment Results

                Hi, jeje.

                After a quick search, I remembered our conversation from several months ago. Some of the links and tips may still be relevant to you, so they are posted below. If not, they may help others who may be reading:

                At the time, the topic was entitled "SC 1 vs. MP K".

                Also - this is the $4 webinar on finding the "sweet spot" of learning, no matter where this might seem according to external standards.


                Let us know how we can help your daughter move forward.

                Thanks-
                Cheryl

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Readiness Assessment Results

                  Thank you all, and especially Cheryl, for your help. My husband came home from work early and we discussed all of this. Clara is on schedule for 2nd grade (and maybe ahead, which is the grade she would be in in about 45 of 50 states with a September birthday) with math. She is great with science (she did 4th grade science with her sister this past year with me reading it all to her and writing her answers). She just really has to learn to read. My husband and I are both exhausted with trying new things to teach reading (not to mention a bit tapped out from the extraordinary cost of 1 hour a week of private reading tutoring for a year), and Drew agrees with you that Clara needs to feel confident and must learn the basics. He is not worried about grade level for reading, and even suggests that it may all just click for her once she gets past the basics. He would like to know if there are things that he can do with her for 1/2 an hour (or so) each night to help her with reading. If anyone has any ideas for some daddy-reading learning time to add on to SC1 I would love to hear what they are. I think he is also happy to not have to buy a new curriculum for this year again, and loves Cheryl's idea that she may be able to use MP 1 next year since we have all of that already, too! I am sorry to be a worry wart. We will go ahead and start SC1 on August 8 as planned.
                  JeJe Greer
                  Mom to:
                  Stella (7M)
                  Clara (SC)

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Readiness Assessment Results

                    Originally posted by jejegreer View Post
                    Thank you all, and especially Cheryl, for your help. My husband came home from work early and we discussed all of this. Clara is on schedule for 2nd grade (and maybe ahead, which is the grade she would be in in about 45 of 50 states with a September birthday) with math. She is great with science (she did 4th grade science with her sister this past year with me reading it all to her and writing her answers). She just really has to learn to read. My husband and I are both exhausted with trying new things to teach reading (not to mention a bit tapped out from the extraordinary cost of 1 hour a week of private reading tutoring for a year), and Drew agrees with you that Clara needs to feel confident and must learn the basics. He is not worried about grade level for reading, and even suggests that it may all just click for her once she gets past the basics. He would like to know if there are things that he can do with her for 1/2 an hour (or so) each night to help her with reading. If anyone has any ideas for some daddy-reading learning time to add on to SC1 I would love to hear what they are. I think he is also happy to not have to buy a new curriculum for this year again, and loves Cheryl's idea that she may be able to use MP 1 next year since we have all of that already, too! I am sorry to be a worry wart. We will go ahead and start SC1 on August 8 as planned.
                    Once she gets to the readers (Fun in the Sun, Primary Phonics readers) maybe those can be read to Dad? Any supplemental Cat in the Hat, etc, when she is ready!
                    Christine

                    (2019/2020)
                    DD1 8/23/09 - SC5/6
                    DS2 9/1/11 - SC3,4, 5/6 combo
                    DD3 2/9/13 -SC2 to start, MP1 second semester

                    Previous Years
                    DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4’
                    DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2)
                    DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK)

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Readiness Assessment Results

                      Originally posted by howiecram View Post
                      Once she gets to the readers (Fun in the Sun, Primary Phonics readers) maybe those can be read to Dad? Any supplemental Cat in the Hat, etc, when she is ready!
                      Daddy can read aloud to her too. Good chapter books that she enjoys. He can do it in installments, a few chapters a night. That magical time is priceless and does wonders to spark a greater interest in and love for books and reading. And the more children are read to, the more literate they become. There's no downside here! Look at the MP 1st or 2nd grade reading lists and pick a few for Clara.

                      She's going to do GREAT, do not worry one bit more about this!
                      Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
                      Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
                      Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
                      Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

                      “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
                      ~Pope St John Paul II

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Readiness Assessment Results

                        Fear not my friend. My son has done kindergarten 3 times now. 1 year in public school and 2 years with me. He is 8 as well. We will be starting SC1 8 week review at the beginning of August.

                        I will say, go with SC1. I couldnt quite figure out where to put him in sc. I wish I wouldve just started at the beginning of SC1. Instead we hopped around with another curriculum (mostly because I couldn't stomach doing kindergarten for a third time) and he is no further along than if we would've just started at the beginning of SC1.

                        The beauty of FSR is that it works on writing with the reading. This is incredibly beneficial to dyslexics. This is just a part of the multiple modalities that Cheryl was talking about.

                        As far as what can dad do? Just like Cheryl suggested, separate phonics instruction from reading practice. You teach phonics, dad does the reading. Reading practice shouldn't be more than 30 minutes anyway. I would start off with 1 sentence apiece. She reads one, he reads one. My son and I are now at a few sentences apiece. He reads 2 or 3 and then I read 1 to 3, depending on how he's doing (more if he's struggling).
                        Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

                        DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
                        DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
                        DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

                        We've completed:
                        Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
                        Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Readiness Assessment Results

                          And just like that, you received 3 answers in 10 minutes
                          Boom.

                          We're here for you and Clara. We get it. We've been there. We want to help, encourage, and cheer you on. Reach out to us and we'll be right with you
                          Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

                          DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
                          DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
                          DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

                          We've completed:
                          Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
                          Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: Readiness Assessment Results

                            Originally posted by Colomama View Post
                            Fear not my friend. My son has done kindergarten 3 times now. 1 year in public school and 2 years with me. He is 8 as well. We will be starting SC1 8 week review at the beginning of August.

                            I will say, go with SC1. I couldnt quite figure out where to put him in sc. I wish I wouldve just started at the beginning of SC1. Instead we hopped around with another curriculum (mostly because I couldn't stomach doing kindergarten for a third time) and he is no further along than if we would've just started at the beginning of SC1.

                            The beauty of FSR is that it works on writing with the reading. This is incredibly beneficial to dyslexics. This is just a part of the multiple modalities that Cheryl was talking about.

                            As far as what can dad do? Just like Cheryl suggested, separate phonics instruction from reading practice. You teach phonics, dad does the reading. Reading practice shouldn't be more than 30 minutes anyway. I would start off with 1 sentence apiece. She reads one, he reads one. My son and I are now at a few sentences apiece. He reads 2 or 3 and then I read 1 to 3, depending on how he's doing (more if he's struggling).
                            Clara also did one partial year at public school kindergarten. She did the rest of that year, and all of last year in Seton grade 1. She could not keep up with the reading/phonics. Even I can't understand what some of their pictures mean! She did remarkably well in the rest of the curriculum, and did 4th grade science with big sister. Reading is the problem. Are you doing SC1 this year?
                            JeJe Greer
                            Mom to:
                            Stella (7M)
                            Clara (SC)

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: Readiness Assessment Results

                              We jumped in at FSR D this summer and will be working through book E, as scheduled in the summer bridge (purchased as a single pdf), starting in August. Then, off to SC2 we go.

                              I think the summer bridge is 8 weeks.
                              Married to DH for 14 years. Living the rural life in the Colorado mountains

                              DS11- Simply Classical 5/6
                              DD9- Simply Classical 5/6 (neurotypical, but schooling with big brother to save mom's sanity)
                              DD 6- Classic Core First Grade

                              We've completed:
                              Classic Core Jr. kindergarten, kindergarten, first grade, and second grade.
                              Simply Classical levels B, C, 1, 2, 3, and 4.

                              Comment

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