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OT: Your Thursday Pick-Me-Up -- Caroline's Cart

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    #16
    Re: OT: Your Thursday Pick-Me-Up -- Caroline's Cart

    Anita,

    I can see we need to make some changes in our office to increase productivity. All we need is a 250 pound bully, and we may get high school finished in record time.

    Thanks for the tip.

    Tanya

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      #17
      Re: OT: Your Thursday Pick-Me-Up -- Caroline's Cart

      Originally posted by tanya View Post
      Anita,

      I can see we need to make some changes in our office to increase productivity. All we need is a 250 pound bully, and we may get high school finished in record time.

      Thanks for the tip.

      Tanya
      He has to be personable and enthusiastic, though. He has to love being a productivity bully. I can see finished high school curricula already
      Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
      Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
      Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
      Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

      “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
      ~Pope St John Paul II

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        #18
        Re: OT: Your Thursday Pick-Me-Up -- Caroline's Cart

        Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
        Btw, the "rough" had nothing to do with curriculum. SC 2 is humming along nicely, with SC 3 following not far behind.


        We're just still navigating young adulthood with special needs here. (As it turns out, homeschooling was the easy part!!)

        Having explored local day programs and settling on one for a few hours a week with my daughter, we're touring the sheltered workshop next as a possibility for my son. That will be interesting.

        However, ... if anyone would like to open a beautifully classical Christian school for young adults with special needs (in Missouri), please let me know!


        Cheryl
        Let me know what you find in Missouri. I'm in Franklin County and my daughter is 12. I think we are another 10 years away from calling her a young adult but she insists she is now.

        Debbie
        Debbie
        Mom to DS 24, DD23 (w/SIL, GS3, GD1), DD15, DD13, DD11(special needs), DS10, DD8, DS5, DD2

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          #19
          Re: OT: Your Thursday Pick-Me-Up -- Caroline's Cart

          Originally posted by debbiejz View Post
          Cheryl
          Let me know what you find in Missouri. I'm in Franklin County and my daughter is 12. I think we are another 10 years away from calling her a young adult but she insists she is now.

          Debbie
          Hi, Debbie. Let me encourage you! We found two good options, both administered by capable, loving, Christian adults. My daughter attends an adult day program founded by an order of nuns. Though the center does not actively teach Catholicism, they freely say a prayer of thanks before meals, and the care is evident. When we toured, I noticed the head nurse's gentleness amid nonverbal adults, some in wheelchairs, some with incontinence, many with loud vocalizations. I marveled as she seemed to float among them, establishing order and calm. She said to me quietly, "You know my secret?" I shook my head, waiting. She smiled, "I love every one of them."

          So this morning, my daughter left to join her friends at this adult day program. She had just spent several edifying, even cerebral, days at Sodalitas, so I wondered how she felt about going back. She said, "Oh, yes! If I do not go, I will miss musical chairs, crafts, Bingo, Nail Care Day, seeing everyone, playing cards...." It seems Michelle started musical chairs in this program that had not yet embraced such jaunty fun. She especially enjoys the women and their "girl talk." She has a place there.


          Across town, my son attends our local sheltered workshop. This, too, is run by hard-working, problem-solving Christian woman who matches tasks to individual abilities. When we first toured, she intended for my Michael to work in the woodshop, but when his hands immediately went to his ears at the high-pitched whirring, she casually said, "You know, I think you might enjoy our next area even more." Michael works on higher-level tasks that are still sufficiently "mindless" to allow his thoughts to explore ideas. He says this is a favorite aspect of his work. He also appreciates his Lunch Buddies. He tells me that in other work settings, he had to try to be someone else in an effort to both discern and assimilate into a social culture he could not access. But at the workshop, he says, "everybody has something. We all look out for each other and work together." He rides the work van to and from, so that adds to the sense of community. He says he has not known such camaraderie his entire life. One of the other workers spent much of a weekend here at our home, so the two could talk without end, swim, and share more time.


          All of this is to say that much has changed from the time we started exploring this world-after-homeschooling. Both of my young adults have enjoyed their respective, new places over a year. They also enjoy taking long pre-dinner walks together to share the antics of the day. It gives them much to discuss.

          Neither attends daily, because they need time to relax a little in between, engage in good reading, personal studies, and writing, but so far, so good! If you work with your local agencies, they can help you find something compatible when the time comes.

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