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Need more printing practice

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    Need more printing practice

    My second grader needs more printing practice. We are using the kindergarten core, except for the reading portion (he uses Barton), and he is in 2nd grade math. I love copybook I, but he really needs more practice since he doesn't get all the practice that comes from FSR. Does anyone have a recommendation for a handwriting workbook that would be very similar in style to MP's manuscript? I like Handwriting without Tears because it helps them understand the formation but it is so different in style to MP's manuscript. I know I could create my own sheets, and that is a possibility, but it would be very nice to have something I can just open up and use. Thanks!
    Susan

    2018-2019
    A (10) - Barton, R&S math 3, SC 3
    C (9) - Barton, R&S math 2, SC 3
    G (5) - Simply Classical C

    #2
    Re: Need more printing practice

    Hi

    I'm not too familiar with "regular" MP products, but I can recommend some SC things.

    The "Simply Classical Copybook" is very gentle, yet extensive, and great practice for printing. It is open-and-go, with no lesson plans really needed. We are also using "My Nature Journal" which includes observation, dictation, printing and drawing. But you would need a mini-lesson plan for that one. If hand strength or overall fine motor is an issue you might consider either of the the Simply Classical scissors books. http://www.memoriapress.com/curriculum/scissors-books

    You're right: FSR has a LOT of printing practice. So we have come along very well with it, combined with the other SC resources. We tried HWT before we came to MP/SC -- no go. But my son (who refused to hold a pencil when we began) has beautiful printing now after we have used many of the SC products.

    Just a suggestion.
    Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
    Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
    Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
    Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

    “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
    ~Pope St John Paul II

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Need more printing practice

      Originally posted by sfhargett View Post
      My second grader needs more printing practice. We are using the kindergarten core, except for the reading portion (he uses Barton), and he is in 2nd grade math. I love copybook I, but he really needs more practice since he doesn't get all the practice that comes from FSR. Does anyone have a recommendation for a handwriting workbook that would be very similar in style to MP's manuscript? I like Handwriting without Tears because it helps them understand the formation but it is so different in style to MP's manuscript. I know I could create my own sheets, and that is a possibility, but it would be very nice to have something I can just open up and use. Thanks!
      Yes! Simply Classical Copybook I will give him dozens of pages for practicing strokes and letters. He will also receive edifying verses from Holy Scripture as copybook exercises.

      Here is the Table of Contents. As Anita mentioned, SC Copybook I is fully "open and go."

      Thanks-
      Cheryl


      ClassicalSpecialNeeds.com

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Need more printing practice

        I'll be waiting for the written results of my boys' language arts evaluation, but one of the preliminary things that one of the evaluating staff mentioned was their pencil grip. He didn't mention that the grip was off, but that the boys are gripping their pencils super tight and pressing harder .... which can lead to fatigue.

        Any tips for helping to remedy this? I know Anita mentioned the Ticonderoga pencils in a different thread. We actually use these mechanical pencils (I bought them as a treat for working hard on their grips). I'm wondering what to do, to encourage them to relax their grip.

        Do we need more fine motor work?
        Plans for 2019-20

        DD1 - 24 - College Grad and rocking her own bakery business
        DD2 - 13 - 8A Louisville HLS Cottage School and MPOA
        DS3 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
        DS4 - 11 - 4A Louisville HLS Cottage School
        DD5 - 7 - MP2, Louisville HLS Cottage School
        DS6 - 5 - MP K

        [url]www.thekennedyadventures.com/all-about-our-memoria-press-homeschool[/url]

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Need more printing practice

          Hi, Dianna.

          After observing your sons, the examiners may have more detailed suggestions for you. In the meantime, you can try some of these ideas.

          Address tight pencil grip directly:


          1. Be sure they have a good, open "C" curve in the hand.
          Place a small ball or crumpled "ball" of paper in the palm to open up the grip. Then remove the object. Have them envision a bubble in their palm, and remind them not to pop the bubble, if they begin to close the grip too much.

          2. Help them relax as they write.
          Iris Hatfield recommends relaxing classical music during handwriting exercises. Encourage deep breaths, good posture, and a relaxed body for writing. You can even rub out their shoulders before they begin.

          3. Use writing implements that encourage relaxed writing.
          Fine-tip markers on white boards or thicker pencils on slant boards might break the hunched-over-the-paper habit.

          4. Take breaks.
          Engage them in writing for brief sessions. Even if they need more writing time, keep the sessions short.

          5. Have them stretch.
          Do finger wiggles, palm presses, and wrist stretches before or after they write.


          Address tight pencil grip indirectly:


          1. Improve upper body strength.
          Have them do "wheelbarrow" exercises, gymnastics, push-ups on the floor, swimming, Push-Down-the-Wall exercises, Roll-the-Ball up & down the wall, monkey bars, etc.

          2. Be sure they write from their shoulder, not their wrist.
          Encourage full-arm engagement. Check and double check sitting position.

          3. Encourage relaxation all day.
          Have them get enough exercise, rest, and outdoor play.



          Looking forward, with you, to those evaluations!

          Thanks-
          Cheryl

          Comment

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