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Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

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Latin

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  • limissc74
    replied
    Re: Latin

    I think my son last had IQ testing when he was 5 or so and it was around 75. I have him scheduled for a full psy./educational evaluation in January. He has an OT evaluation next week. I'm anxious to see if there is anything different that comes up. He was at a private school for students with learning differences for 7 years. He was happy there, but there was never an appropriate grouping that worked at his educational level. I have a lot of "mom guilt" for not pulling him out sooner, but am thankful I can now. I appreciate the responses - it is always good to see you're not alone. Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • cherylswope
    replied
    Re: Latin

    Originally posted by limissc74 View Post
    I recently started home schooling my 14 year old special needs son. He is adopted and is delayed has ADHD, dyslexia, dysgraphia and sensory integration disorder. I quickly put together a curriculum for him when we started, but am very interested in the classical way of teaching. He's working on Barton Reading and is in the third book (words with consonants and short vowels). I see in the products section that Latin should be introduced when a student can read and write well. I think it will be awhile before this will happen - and I don't know if he will ever read and write "well". Does that mean I should leave Latin out and focus on his deficits at this time? Thanks!
    Btw, what is his (approximate) tested I.Q.? After his reading becomes stronger, he might be able to move directly to First Form Latin. FFL comes with a CD and DVD, so it would not be all reading.

    Grammar-based, rich in history, grammar, and language skills, this could even become the centerpiece of his education. (See this book: Latin-Centered Curriculum to learn how Latin streamlines your language-arts program.)

    My daughter loves First Form Latin because of the predictable teaching layout with clear practice sessions. Andrew Pudewa has endorsed First Form Latin as "the best-structured course on any subject I have ever seen." Something to consider -

    Keep us posted with his progress in reading, and we can help you decide when the time comes!

    Thanks-
    Cheryl


    ClassicalSpecialNeeds.com

    Leave a comment:


  • Anita
    replied
    Re: Latin

    Originally posted by limissc74 View Post
    I found you on the Well Trained Mind board after reading that book. I can't wait to read your book this weekend. It seems it will really help me figure out how to give my son the best education that he deserves. Thanks!
    Yes it will! WELCOME!

    Leave a comment:


  • limissc74
    replied
    Re: Latin

    I found you on the Well Trained Mind board after reading that book. I can't wait to read your book this weekend. It seems it will really help me figure out how to give my son the best education that he deserves. Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • cherylswope
    replied
    Re: Latin

    Originally posted by limissc74 View Post
    I recently started home schooling my 14 year old special needs son. He is adopted and is delayed has ADHD, dyslexia, dysgraphia and sensory integration disorder. I quickly put together a curriculum for him when we started, but am very interested in the classical way of teaching. He's working on Barton Reading and is in the third book (words with consonants and short vowels). I see in the products section that Latin should be introduced when a student can read and write well. I think it will be awhile before this will happen - and I don't know if he will ever read and write "well". Does that mean I should leave Latin out and focus on his deficits at this time? Thanks!

    Welcome! Work with Barton first, because you do not want to confuse vowel pronunciations.

    However, as you do this, you can introduce the classical language informally, as Heather suggested.

    We enjoyed these two resources while we waited for beginning-level reading:
    1. Rummy Roots, a card game with different levels of Latin and Greek roots. (Use only level one for now.)
    2. Lingua Angelica CD (note - CD only), a beautiful collection of sacred music set to Latin. The CD accustoms the ear to the sound of Latin in a peaceful, soothingly lyrical way without interfering with English phonics in the instructional classroom setting.

    In another 6-12 months, you might consider beginning with Prima Latina which will assist English vocabulary, grammar and the more analytical study of language in general.

    Fwiw, both of my homeschooled children have specific learning disabilities, yet they find that Latin greatly assists, not hinders, their facility with language.


    Your post was music to my ears. If you have time, please tell how you heard about us.

    Thanks -
    Cheryl


    Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

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  • HeatherB
    replied
    Re: Latin

    I have 2 children we adopted from Latvia who have some similar struggles to what you are describing (under the umbrella of FAS). I have been focusing on their reading/language deficits. I have introduced some Latin vocabulary but it is super casual as they are not ready for Prima Latina yet. They do listen and try along with my other son's prayers he is learning in Prima Latina but otherwise I don't worry about Latin instruction yet. I think Cheryl mentions some vocabulary games? Maybe Latin Rummy or something like that is mentioned in her book? I think that might be fun and casual way to introduce Latin while working on improving his language/reading.

    heather

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  • limissc74
    started a topic Latin

    Latin

    I recently started home schooling my 14 year old special needs son. He is adopted and is delayed has ADHD, dyslexia, dysgraphia and sensory integration disorder. I quickly put together a curriculum for him when we started, but am very interested in the classical way of teaching. He's working on Barton Reading and is in the third book (words with consonants and short vowels). I see in the products section that Latin should be introduced when a student can read and write well. I think it will be awhile before this will happen - and I don't know if he will ever read and write "well". Does that mean I should leave Latin out and focus on his deficits at this time? Thanks!
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