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This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

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New to homeschooling.

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    New to homeschooling.

    Hello this will be my first year homeschooling. I have a 3rd grade son and a 2nd grade son. My second grade has ADD and has been passed through special ed classes and in my opinion hasn't been pushed just babied through his education. Going into second grade he seems to understand math better then reading. In fact I can't get him to read anything! The teachers say he's doing well but he doesn't know any sight words and barely sounds out words correctly. I plan on having him use the same curriculum this year as his 3rd grade brother but I'd like his English/reading to be different. What level do you think I should start him on? Should I just have him read every night with me? I'm so confused as to the best course of action.

    #2
    Re: New to homeschooling.

    Originally posted by JessiJoy View Post
    Hello this will be my first year homeschooling. I have a 3rd grade son and a 2nd grade son. My second grade has ADD and has been passed through special ed classes and in my opinion hasn't been pushed just babied through his education. Going into second grade he seems to understand math better then reading. In fact I can't get him to read anything! The teachers say he's doing well but he doesn't know any sight words and barely sounds out words correctly. I plan on having him use the same curriculum this year as his 3rd grade brother but I'd like his English/reading to be different. What level do you think I should start him on? Should I just have him read every night with me? I'm so confused as to the best course of action.

    Welcome to this forum and to homeschooling! You will want to do three things right away:

    1. Begin immediately teaching your son every day with a strong reading program that includes explicit phonics instruction. Start at the beginning. This program, First Start Reading, can help you remediate difficulties and eliminate poor pencil grip, random word guessing, and other bad habits. The step-by-step instructions make the program easy to teach. The well-researched approach is thorough, so you avoid any gaps in learning. Moreover, it is affordable! FSR uniquely combines printing-phonics-reading to send information to the mind via multiple pathways every day. Select his best time for learning (i.e., most cooperative, most attentive), and teach daily in brief sessions. No need to have him read out loud to you, until he has the tools to do so. When he can begin reading accurately, then you can add a daily reading session to promote fluency.

    2. Establish behavioral guidelines for your home reading instruction.
    Let him know what is expected. Enforce your expectations with clear consequences, but also set up a reading-time incentive to promote enthusiasm and success. Teach at the same quiet place each day, free from visual and auditory distractions. Use clear, short verbal directions to assist concentration. Make reading instruction the daily priority. Explain that you are going to be starting from the beginning, because you want him to be a strong reader.

    3. Obtain a larger understanding of reading instruction.
    You can read through the sections in this book: Phonics from A to Z. The author explains how to teach sounds with photos of the lips/mouth. He explains more than phonics. For example, he argues the importance of teaching a good non-fiction vocabulary to promote strong reading. In the book you will find good lists of fun books to read as you teach (e.g., "Hop on Pop" when teaching short o.). You might be able to find Phonics from A to Z at your library. If not, Memoria Press makes this resource available here.


    Some additional background would be helpful, if you would like to follow up:
    -When your son received the diagnosis of ADD, was any other testing done at the time?
    -Do you suspect learning disabilities as a possible cause of his difficulties, or just poor instruction?
    -Is there any family history of learning difficulties or diagnosed learning disabilities, dyslexia, etc.?
    -Is your son 6 or 7?
    -Do you plan to teach both boys from the Memoria Press 3rd grade or from another curriculum?


    You have already taken the first important steps by determining to homeschool your son and give him individualized reading instruction! He is young, so you can turn this around for him.

    Over the next few months, by giving your son one-on-one reading instruction every day, you will soon have your "finger on the pulse" of his reading. After several months of daily instruction and practice, if you begin to suspect organic causes -- rather than merely negligent instruction -- you can pursue more formal testing and targeted remediation, if necessary. If you suspect this already, you might begin the process of pursuing a formal evaluation while you begin to give him good, clear instruction in reading. The wait is often prolonged, so you can begin instruction as outlined above, while you wait.



    One more option -- I understand the desire to combine your boys' instruction for the sake of time. However, if you wanted to consider a full curriculum designed to help a struggling child learn to read, practice phonics, and receive a broad education in literature, nature study, biblical literacy, writing, arithmetic, and more - all at his own level of instruction - we offer a step-by-step, fully integrated program that might suit his needs well for this year: Simply Classical Curriculum Level 1. This program incorporates FSR and Phonics A to Z with daily lesson plans written for you. After his foundational skills become strong, you might combine the boys even more effectively in another year or two. Just something to consider.


    If you have any further questions, feel free to follow up.


    Thanks-
    Cheryl


    Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

    Cheryl Swope, M.Ed., with foreword by Dr. Gene Edward Veith


    Simply Classical Curriculum
    - more levels to come - Level 2 in 2016

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      #3
      Re: New to homeschooling.

      Yes I believe his ADD is the cause. He and school mates put him down for not knowing enough. He gives up quickly now that he's on medication, I need to sit with him and explain that he's not stupid we just need to find his way of learning. Usually then he'll try again. He loves to learn and is very good at math like myself. I believe he will be fine with 3rd grade science, latin, cursive and math. I had small seizures of the brain as a child. They suggested I should be put on medication but my mother was fearful and did not. Because of that school life was difficult even after I grew out of it. I will get the reading curriculum from the beginning and start looking into further testing to pinpoint my 8 year olds medically explained difficulties.
      Thank you very much for all the help!

      Comment


        #4
        Re: New to homeschooling.

        Hi Jessi

        I know you will find great help and solace for yourself and your son in the SC/MP curricula. Our family has benefitted hugely from the Simply Classical self-assessments, VKAT strategies, and course material. YOU CAN DO THIS! My older two children have severe language processing disorders and they have made huge leaps in just the past few months. So don't be discouraged. Great things are around the bend.

        Huge hugs as you start your journey.
        “If I should fall even a thousand times a day, a thousand times, with peaceful repentance, I will say immediately, Nunc Coepi, ‘Now, I begin.’.”

        ~Venerable Bruno Lanteri
        ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        Wonder Boy 14 ... MP5 + R&S Math 6
        Joy Bubble 12 ... MP5 full core
        Cowboy 10 ... MP5 + R&S Math 4
        Sassafras 6 ... MP1
        All … SSPX Catechesis

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