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Placement help, level A or B for my 5 year old with DS

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    Placement help, level A or B for my 5 year old with DS

    I am so very excited that a friend of mine recently told me about Memoria Press's special need products. So here is my situation. I have four children (14 dd w/ very significant and global developmental delays, 11 yr old typical son, 5 1/2 yr old son w/ DS and 4 yr old typical son). I looked at the assessment for level A and Daniel (who has DS) has mastered all of the assessment criteria in for this level. He is very behind on is expressive language, he is trying to speak, but has a lot of trouble with articulation, we are also using signs and about to start using a communication device. I think that he is ready for level B, but I don't want us to miss anything by skipping level B. I am planning on working with both of my little ones at the same time, and I always include my 14 year old in activities with the young brothers. We will have three good solid days at home next year, as my 11 year old son will be taking outside classes for 1 1/2 days a week, so on the half day we can do school in the afternoon. I have probably given you way too much irrelevant info. Thank you for any help that anyone can offer.

    #2
    I vote B

    I looked at the readiness assessment for my son and he was clearly Level C. I, too, did not want to "miss" anything in the lower levels. Level B, especially, emphasizes good manners, helping, self-care, etc., and I wanted to capitalize on that, as those are areas we need a little "push" in. However, had I ordered Level B for him, he would have been bored, restless, less easy to teach (because he wasn't challenged) and he would not have "stretched and matured" the way he has this past school year. So I think you should proceed with Level B according to what your readiness assessment results are -- you know, from my non-professional Mom's point-of-view.

    Two things:
    1) You might order the Lesson Plans for Level A and look them over. There are a lot of great exercises and enrichment activities in them to strengthen just about any child (gross motor, music, fine motor, life skills). So that might be worth it.
    2) All the MP and SC products are returnable and refundable for 30 days (I believe). So if you order Level B and it doesn't fit, send it back. Having said that, though, don't be discouraged if your first few days and weeks with the curriculum are challenging. We started with Level C and, I must confess, I was FREAKED OUT those first few weeks. I never expected my son to respond the way he did to the work required. He has FAR exceeded my expectations of what I thought he could do.

    Just my two cents. Best of luck!
    Boy Wonder: 12, Seton and MP Electives (Special Needs)
    Joy Bubble: 10, Seton and MP Electives (Special Needs)
    Snuggly Cowboy: 8, Seton and MP Electives
    The Comedian: 4, Seton/MP Pre-K, though she’ll probably zoom through that in a week.

    “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
    ~Pope St John Paul II

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by sking View Post
      I am so very excited that a friend of mine recently told me about Memoria Press's special need products. So here is my situation. I have four children (14 dd w/ very significant and global developmental delays, 11 yr old typical son, 5 1/2 yr old son w/ DS and 4 yr old typical son). I looked at the assessment for level A and Daniel (who has DS) has mastered all of the assessment criteria in for this level. He is very behind on is expressive language, he is trying to speak, but has a lot of trouble with articulation, we are also using signs and about to start using a communication device. I think that he is ready for level B, but I don't want us to miss anything by skipping level B. I am planning on working with both of my little ones at the same time, and I always include my 14 year old in activities with the young brothers. We will have three good solid days at home next year, as my 11 year old son will be taking outside classes for 1 1/2 days a week, so on the half day we can do school in the afternoon. I have probably given you way too much irrelevant info. Thank you for any help that anyone can offer.

      Welcome!

      This is ALL helpful. The family information provides good context.

      Does Daniel meet 100% of the expressive-language criteria in the Language Assessment for Level A?


      Repeats sounds, tries to imitate words
      Says “dada” and “mama” specifically
      Makes consonant sounds
      “Tells” you what she wants, even if only by pointing
      Follows simple directions

      Links two words together (“more juice”)
      Uses pronouns (“me” or “mine”)
      Imitates phrases (“Go bye-bye”)

      Repeats words she hears
      Shows increasing spoken vocabulary (20-50 words)
      Finishes sentences in predictable books (Mom: “Goodnight, cow jumping over the ... " Child: "Moon!")
      Enjoys conversation


      If yes, proceed to Level B. Anita already makes a good case for this!

      If no, you may want to consider Level A for these reasons:

      1. You have an age appropriate "window" right now for expressive language. Level A focuses on expressive language in a foundational way.
      2. You have only 3 days a week.
      3. Your 4yo could easily join you in Level A.
      4. Level A is the least expensive!
      5. Your 14yo dd will enjoy the Level A stories. (My daughter is 20 -- borderline intellectual disability, autism, learning disabilities -- and she loves those books!)

      In addition to emphasizing expressive language, Level A will accustom Daniel to practicing all of these skills: listening to stories, having a structured day, and being actively engaged in oral learning. All of this will give him (and your 4yo) a good foundation for Level B, which will require much more written participation for both boys. If, after 4-6 weeks, you found that you could cover more than one lesson per day, you could then progress more quickly to Level B.


      Thanks-
      Cheryl

      Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

      Simply Classical Curriculum Assessments

      Simply Classical Curriculum & Resources - more SC packages & SC stand-alone resources to come!

      Comment


        #4
        We just finished level A with our daughter, 4 ½, with Ds. She still isn't meeting all the expressive language markers for level A, but overall, based on the readiness for level B, it's the right fit for her. I have no idea how long it will take for her expressive language to catch up with her receptive language or her cognitive ability and I wanted to continue to foster her growth in those areas while still working on speech (privately and at home; at home we use the See and Learn Speech resources from Down Syndrome Education USA along with what is sent home from her SLP). We started slowly and have taken a bit of a break while I regain energy after a full year homeschooling. But she surprises me with her love of the literature selections and Bible stories, which I thought would be too long for her.
        Brit

        Catholic mom to five
        2019-2020:
        Ds '01 - College freshman: Thomas Aquinas College
        Ds '03 - 10th grade: MPOA Algebra 2, and a bunch of other stuff
        Ds '06 - 8th: MP Tiner science (chemistry, physics, and astronomy), 8M lit, 8M Exploring Planet Earth, ancient history, OLVS 8 Catechism
        Dd '10 (Down syndrome) - JrK with little brother and BOB books
        Ds '15 - JrK with big sister

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by MyLittleWonders View Post
          We just finished level A with our daughter, 4 ½, with Ds. She still isn't meeting all the expressive language markers for level A, but overall, based on the readiness for level B, it's the right fit for her. I have no idea how long it will take for her expressive language to catch up with her receptive language or her cognitive ability and I wanted to continue to foster her growth in those areas while still working on speech (privately and at home; at home we use the See and Learn Speech resources from Down Syndrome Education USA along with what is sent home from her SLP). We started slowly and have taken a bit of a break while I regain energy after a full year homeschooling. But she surprises me with her love of the literature selections and Bible stories, which I thought would be too long for her.
          To echo what you said about milestones: my son (and daughter) are still behind on expressive and receptive language readiness for where they "place" overall. I know it's not an option for everyone, but I ordered Levels A, B and C for my three children (my youngest is almost 3 and fits squarely in Level A). I knew I would need all three levels anyway, so I purchased them.

          The striking thing about this is that my son, 7, enjoys the books in Level A AND Level C. He loves that he understands most of the vocabulary in Level A and is refreshed on concepts that he is still figuring out (over, under, behind, etc.) . But he loves the beauty and complexity of the books in Level C. So I anticipate that we will use this approach (remediation and challenge) for subsequent levels as we proceed.

          I read Level A-type books to him when he was a baby/toddler and I didn't know if they were "sinking in". They are some of his favorite books now Similarly, even though I know Level C books are mostly above his comprehension, I feel sure that he appreciates them and will hold them in the same esteem as old favorites. He will also have lots of time to revisit them, as his younger brother and sister will be taught them when they reach Level C. So I try not to focus too much on what he is absorbing and acheiving now -- -- even though he is doing well in both areas -- because, like seeds in the ground, we can never really SEE what our children's education is doing in their minds, hearts and souls. We get glimpses of it, though, when we fill their world with as much beauty as we can. And teaching to their level, with accommodation, is a good way to fulfill that goal.
          Boy Wonder: 12, Seton and MP Electives (Special Needs)
          Joy Bubble: 10, Seton and MP Electives (Special Needs)
          Snuggly Cowboy: 8, Seton and MP Electives
          The Comedian: 4, Seton/MP Pre-K, though she’ll probably zoom through that in a week.

          “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
          ~Pope St John Paul II

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Anita View Post
            To echo what you said about milestones: my son (and daughter) are still behind on expressive and receptive language readiness for where they "place" overall. I know it's not an option for everyone, but I ordered Levels A, B and C for my three children (my youngest is almost 3 and fits squarely in Level A). I knew I would need all three levels anyway, so I purchased them.

            The striking thing about this is that my son, 7, enjoys the books in Level A AND Level C. He loves that he understands most of the vocabulary in Level A and is refreshed on concepts that he is still figuring out (over, under, behind, etc.) . But he loves the beauty and complexity of the books in Level C. So I anticipate that we will use this approach (remediation and challenge) for subsequent levels as we proceed.

            I read Level A-type books to him when he was a baby/toddler and I didn't know if they were "sinking in". They are some of his favorite books now Similarly, even though I know Level C books are mostly above his comprehension, I feel sure that he appreciates them and will hold them in the same esteem as old favorites. He will also have lots of time to revisit them, as his younger brother and sister will be taught them when they reach Level C. So I try not to focus too much on what he is absorbing and acheiving now -- -- even though he is doing well in both areas -- because, like seeds in the ground, we can never really SEE what our children's education is doing in their minds, hearts and souls. We get glimpses of it, though, when we fill their world with as much beauty as we can. And teaching to their level, with accommodation, is a good way to fulfill that goal.
            I've kept all the Level A books out and accessible for Kate. She loves bringing them to us to read. All the Level B books are out, and I have a few on audio book for her also (one thing we've been doing for a while now is having a play list on an old iPod for her - audio books, the Ted Jacobs' poetry to music from Level B, rote counting tracks from a neurodevelopmental math program, and some songs (Raffi and such). She loves the playlist and listens for quite a long period of time. Anything to help her auditory listening/learning ability and to introduce her to more and more language. Plus I've purchased some of the Jr. Kindergarten read aloud books (we also own quite a few of them), that I'm slowly introducing. Even if we get to them in a more formal way, I'm going to foster her love of books as much as possible. Plus, we just love books around here anyway.

            I've debated buying all of Level C and having those books out and available too. Kate loves books. She's not keen on coloring yet. So, maybe only 2x a week I'll pull out one of the coloring activities from Level B. It's funny because she loves "writing" and "doing schoolwork" in blank books or in her brothers' school books. But coloring books just aren't something she likes at this time (her brothers were never color in coloring books kids). So we will progress with the learning, though without the daily coloring component. She'll get there eventually, and in the meantime, we still work on fine motor activities in other ways.
            Brit

            Catholic mom to five
            2019-2020:
            Ds '01 - College freshman: Thomas Aquinas College
            Ds '03 - 10th grade: MPOA Algebra 2, and a bunch of other stuff
            Ds '06 - 8th: MP Tiner science (chemistry, physics, and astronomy), 8M lit, 8M Exploring Planet Earth, ancient history, OLVS 8 Catechism
            Dd '10 (Down syndrome) - JrK with little brother and BOB books
            Ds '15 - JrK with big sister

            Comment


              #7
              WOW! Wonderful stuff.

              Don't be discouraged about the coloring. Will come with time. My son just started engaging with crayons (coloring with them, not lining them up or examining them) this year. His progress has been wonderful. He's still not a "typical color-er", but we are making strides. And his excitement about printing is a minor miracle. We previously tried Handwriting Without Tears -- a no-go. But I think within the context of a "whole package" he enjoys SC printing because he sees it as being cohesive with the entirety of "school", not just an isolated skill we are working on. I am so glad that all the pictures in the letters, numbers and FSR workbooks are consistent! It's a great help.

              Anyway, blah blah blah. Didn't mean to hijack the thread here ;D
              Boy Wonder: 12, Seton and MP Electives (Special Needs)
              Joy Bubble: 10, Seton and MP Electives (Special Needs)
              Snuggly Cowboy: 8, Seton and MP Electives
              The Comedian: 4, Seton/MP Pre-K, though she’ll probably zoom through that in a week.

              “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
              ~Pope St John Paul II

              Comment

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