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This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

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Third Grade

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    Third Grade

    Hello,

    I've been planning on using Memoria Press for third grade and looking forward to it. My little one (8 in August) has been having difficulties with printing and reading and was diagnosed this spring with dysgraphia and vision issues. She is also a VERY physically active child. We have begun vision therapy, there is also some long-term OT to address motor skills, printing, coordination and similar issues coming up in the fall after we finish vision therapy.

    She will need to do much of her work orally for the time being, as well in short stretches with plenty of breaks. I also need to allow about 2 hours daily for therapy exercises and certain activities that will help with therapy and motor skills. I've tried to adjust my homeschooling philosophies and learning plans to be more "un-schoolish", but we are just bouncing off of each other-I need the outline and structure of a curriculum, it is so helpful to me. She enjoys Latin, art and history. Also, at heart I firmly believe in the classical education model.

    Is there anyone with similar issues who has made Memoria Press work for their child? Have you found anything particularly helpful?

    Thanks.

    #2
    Welcome!

    I can't speak to the vision issues but my son's joint attention has GREATLY IMPROVED since we began Simply Classical with Memoria Press. He has a severe language processing disorder and, although he is 7, only understands language on about a 3-year-old level. Thus, reading aloud and taking direction (and learning new concepts, for the most part) are a challenge. Combine this with his STRONG WILL and man! I was STRETCHED to find something that worked for homeschool. We started Level C last Fall and the gains have been INCREDIBLE.

    The beautiful thing about the curriculum is that it is fairly predictable each day. Things vary slightly (we are not asked to do recitation every day, for example) but for the most part, the Lesson Plans follow an order that is very consistent so my guys know what is coming next. The material/topics change as we learn new things, but my kids anticipate that we will open and close our day with prayer, for example, and that Phonics and Reading comes after Letters and Printing, after which follows Math. This structured approach has been a God-send for us. I don't have to plan NEARLY as much and my children (who love order, even though they balk) are getting a wonderful education.

    A caveat: once you first start (given what you mentioned about your daughter's activity level) you might have to break each day down in to two (possibly three) days. Don't be discouraged. Once she catches on and you start to get used to how the Lesson works, you'll start making grater strides. We started out with about an hour of work every day back in September. Now, in May, we are doing three to four hours of school-related work per day. And my son, whose greatest challenge is language, is outpacing the Lesson Plans for reading. We are consistently pages ahead of where we are asked to be in the Letters workbook and in First Start Reading. He still struggles with printing neatly, pencil grip and remembering how to form the letter "A", for example, but with the amount of practice we are doing and will continue to do throughout his school career, I am confident he will be fine. So: it took him a bit to catch on, but now we are RUNNING.

    As far as support -- you are in the RIGHT PLACE! I have gotten such incredible help here for issues related to what my kids' challenges are. Just about anything you need will be addressed by members and moderators who are knowledgeable, caring, friendly and wise.

    Again, welcome!
    Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
    Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
    Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
    Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

    “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
    ~Pope St John Paul II

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by ED051802 View Post
      Hello,

      I've been planning on using Memoria Press for third grade and looking forward to it. My little one (8 in August) has been having difficulties with printing and reading and was diagnosed this spring with dysgraphia and vision issues. She is also a VERY physically active child. We have begun vision therapy, there is also some long-term OT to address motor skills, printing, coordination and similar issues coming up in the fall after we finish vision therapy.

      She will need to do much of her work orally for the time being, as well in short stretches with plenty of breaks. I also need to allow about 2 hours daily for therapy exercises and certain activities that will help with therapy and motor skills. I've tried to adjust my homeschooling philosophies and learning plans to be more "un-schoolish", but we are just bouncing off of each other-I need the outline and structure of a curriculum, it is so helpful to me. She enjoys Latin, art and history. Also, at heart I firmly believe in the classical education model.

      Is there anyone with similar issues who has made Memoria Press work for their child? Have you found anything particularly helpful?

      Thanks.

      Welcome! Yes, we have similar issues here. Even as a toddler, my daughter moved continually -- climbing swiftly, dashing about, leaping from one thing to the next. She was dx'd with ADHD far earlier than her twin brother. People describe her today as "very busy," and she admits, "I'm not a person who likes to be idle!"

      Yet she needs a great deal of structure to avoid randomness.

      I love this description:

      I've tried to adjust my homeschooling philosophies and learning plans to be more "un-schoolish", but we are just bouncing off of each other.

      Exactly. We found Memoria Press resources very helpful for us. Inherently structured and easy to teach, the well-organized lessons suited my daughter's needs especially well, because each lesson follows a predictable format. She even loved First Form Latin!

      Given my daughter's visual-spatial difficulties, we also appreciate the "clean" layout of information and exercises. Often we conducted lessons orally, and when I needed her to write, the visually uncluttered presentation made this much easier for her. If you have looked inside the books, you already know what I mean.


      Like your daughter, my daughter required OT and other therapies. If you have not yet read Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child, you might find quite a bit of encouragement as well as practical strategies, such as "portable classical education" to accommodate the drive time to and from therapies.

      Here are a few tips that help us optimize a classical education through Memoria Press:

      -Teach Smaller Portions than the Lesson Plans Recommend

      As Anita mentioned, break up the expected lessons into smaller parts. Plan on 2-4 days per 1 day, at least at first. I often drew a quick line with a red "Stop" on my children's pages before they opened the book. When they saw the various sections on the page, they knew we would cover only the marked sections. This helped prevent feelings of being overwhelmed.

      -Move Often
      Some years we opened at the kitchen table with our overview, Bible story, and memory work. Then we moved to the piano where we sang Lingua Angelica Latin songs or hymns. Then we moved back to the table for Latin lessons.

      For Latin recitations, we began with declensions. One twin stood on a balance board. (Both boy/girl twins have autism, learning disabilities, ADHD, and more.) The other twin stood on one foot to increase balance. (These were prescribed therapy exercises.) When we switched to conjugations, they changed positions. For both declensions and conjugations, they squeezed their OT hand-strengthening balls. We did this for years.

      After Latin recitations, we sat at the table for formal Latin lessons. One twin might "relax" or work assigned visual-spatial puzzles while the other received a formal math lesson.

      We then moved downstairs for math where I taught at a work table from a small white board.The first math student received a balance ball on which to sit (core strengthening, focus, balance) for working independent math problems, while I retrieved the other for a formal math lesson.

      All of this varied from semester to semester or year to year, as needed, but we moved throughout the day for daily schooling. None of the actual teaching sessions lasted more than 30-40 minutes. This helped too.


      -Allow Oral Responses for Content Areas
      You already know to do this, but it is important to include as a "freeing" strategy. Select the most important subjects for writing: phonics/spelling, penmanship, math, drawing. Allow the others to be oral and conversational: Latin, literature, history, art and music appreciation. Bonus: this oral approach will assist her oral language, attention, and social skills (turn-taking, conversational skills, focusing, staying on a topic, avoiding tangents).

      -Teach at a Level Lower than Her Actual Age, If Needed
      If needed, feel free to begin lower than third grade right now. The Memoria Press materials lend themselves to this, because nothing is "cartoonish" or "babyish." Rather, the covers are artistic and beautiful, and the content is rich. This helps our special-needs children considerably. If you look too far ahead and fear she'll never "catch up," you can relax a little bit by knowing that you can create high-school courses from 7th-9th grade materials. (Even as adults, many of us wish we had been educated with a classical education at this level with Memoria Press!)


      For your nearly 8yo daughter, take a look at the 2nd grade Core Curriculum options in addition to 3rd grade. See what you think.

      You have at least three choices:
      1. Core Curriculum
      Select from the 2nd-grade or 3rd-grade options, especially if your daughter is your only child, and teach a full core. All of the lesson plans are integrated, so this assists understanding and helps avoid gaps in learning. Simply take it at a slower pace, if needed. Allow yourself -- ahead of time -- the flexibility and freedom to teach and enjoy, rather than worrying about checking boxes. The lesson plans are not a to become a relentless dictator; rather, they simply give you an outline and a structure, as you mentioned.

      2. Customized Core Curriculum
      You can mix & match to create a fully individualized core. See the "Customize" tab for all of the options. You receive individual lesson plans for any subject you choose to customize.

      3. Create Your Own Curriculum from Individual Resources
      Given the other demands on your daughter's time, you could prioritize for this year. You might select only a few resources to teach phonics, spelling, Latin, math, and literature (perhaps 1-2 books, rather than many). Add enrichment, if time permits. Supplement with related field trips, art activities, and read-aloud sessions with Memoria Press as your anchor.



      Whether you select core, customized core, or individual materials, if you add the above suggestions along with those in Simply Classical, your daughter will receive a very strong education!

      If you have any more questions, feel free to ask.

      Thanks-
      Cheryl

      Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

      Simply Classical Curriculum - more levels to come

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks!

        but with the amount of practice we are doing and will continue to do throughout his school career, I am confident he will be fine. So: it took him a bit to catch on, but now we are RUNNING.

        As far as support -- you are in the RIGHT PLACE! I have gotten such incredible help here for issues related to what my kids' challenges are. Just about anything you need will be addressed by members and moderators who are knowledgeable, caring, friendly and wise.

        Again, welcome




        Thank you so much for sharing your experience and suggestions with me. I haven't felt this hopeful in a few weeks, thank you for the reminders and suggestions.

        Comment


          #5
          Thanks

          Thank you so much. I appreciate it. This is very helpful information and ideas, and I appreciate them. I feel like I can finally exhale a huge sigh of relief! I'm so thrilled to hear there is a way for us to continue to use Memoria Press in spite of my little one's learning challenges-we have been delighted with what we've used with our older child. I was very heartened by both of your experiences using the curriculum and the suggestions on adapting presenting the materials and working with your children. Thanks for the reminder that benefits to doing what needs to be done orally do very much exist, I hadn't seen that flipside..

          Thank you.







          Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
          Welcome! Yes, we have similar issues here. Even as a toddler, my daughter moved continually -- climbing swiftly, dashing about, leaping from one thing to the next. She was dx'd with ADHD far earlier than her twin brother. People describe her today as "very busy," and she admits, "I'm not a person who likes to be idle!"

          Yet she needs a great deal of structure to avoid randomness.

          I love this description:

          I've tried to adjust my homeschooling philosophies and learning plans to be more "un-schoolish", but we are just bouncing off of each other.

          Exactly. We found Memoria Press resources very helpful for us. Inherently structured and easy to teach, the well-organized lessons suited my daughter's needs especially well, because each lesson follows a predictable format. She even loved First Form Latin!

          Given my daughter's visual-spatial difficulties, we also appreciate the "clean" layout of information and exercises. Often we conducted lessons orally, and when I needed her to write, the visually uncluttered presentation made this much easier for her. If you have looked inside the books, you already know what I mean.


          Like your daughter, my daughter required OT and other therapies. If you have not yet read Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child, you might find quite a bit of encouragement as well as practical strategies, such as "portable classical education" to accommodate the drive time to and from therapies.

          Here are a few tips that help us optimize a classical education through Memoria Press:

          -Teach Smaller Portions than the Lesson Plans Recommend

          As Anita mentioned, break up the expected lessons into smaller parts. Plan on 2-4 days per 1 day, at least at first. I often drew a quick line with a red "Stop" on my children's pages before they opened the book. When they saw the various sections on the page, they knew we would cover only the marked sections. This helped prevent feelings of being overwhelmed.

          -Move Often
          Some years we opened at the kitchen table with our overview, Bible story, and memory work. Then we moved to the piano where we sang Lingua Angelica Latin songs or hymns. Then we moved back to the table for Latin lessons.

          For Latin recitations, we began with declensions. One twin stood on a balance board. (Both boy/girl twins have autism, learning disabilities, ADHD, and more.) The other twin stood on one foot to increase balance. (These were prescribed therapy exercises.) When we switched to conjugations, they changed positions. For both declensions and conjugations, they squeezed their OT hand-strengthening balls. We did this for years.

          After Latin recitations, we sat at the table for formal Latin lessons. One twin might "relax" or work assigned visual-spatial puzzles while the other received a formal math lesson.

          We then moved downstairs for math where I taught at a work table from a small white board.The first math student received a balance ball on which to sit (core strengthening, focus, balance) for working independent math problems, while I retrieved the other for a formal math lesson.

          All of this varied from semester to semester or year to year, as needed, but we moved throughout the day for daily schooling. None of the actual teaching sessions lasted more than 30-40 minutes. This helped too.


          -Allow Oral Responses for Content Areas
          You already know to do this, but it is important to include as a "freeing" strategy. Select the most important subjects for writing: phonics/spelling, penmanship, math, drawing. Allow the others to be oral and conversational: Latin, literature, history, art and music appreciation. Bonus: this oral approach will assist her oral language, attention, and social skills (turn-taking, conversational skills, focusing, staying on a topic, avoiding tangents).

          -Teach at a Level Lower than Her Actual Age, If Needed
          If needed, feel free to begin lower than third grade right now. The Memoria Press materials lend themselves to this, because nothing is "cartoonish" or "babyish." Rather, the covers are artistic and beautiful, and the content is rich. This helps our special-needs children considerably. If you look too far ahead and fear she'll never "catch up," you can relax a little bit by knowing that you can create high-school courses from 7th-9th grade materials. (Even as adults, many of us wish we had been educated with a classical education at this level with Memoria Press!)


          For your nearly 8yo daughter, take a look at the 2nd grade Core Curriculum options in addition to 3rd grade. See what you think.

          You have at least three choices:
          1. Core Curriculum
          Select from the 2nd-grade or 3rd-grade options, especially if your daughter is your only child, and teach a full core. All of the lesson plans are integrated, so this assists understanding and helps avoid gaps in learning. Simply take it at a slower pace, if needed. Allow yourself -- ahead of time -- the flexibility and freedom to teach and enjoy, rather than worrying about checking boxes. The lesson plans are not a to become a relentless dictator; rather, they simply give you an outline and a structure, as you mentioned.

          2. Customized Core Curriculum
          You can mix & match to create a fully individualized core. See the "Customize" tab for all of the options. You receive individual lesson plans for any subject you choose to customize.

          3. Create Your Own Curriculum from Individual Resources
          Given the other demands on your daughter's time, you could prioritize for this year. You might select only a few resources to teach phonics, spelling, Latin, math, and literature (perhaps 1-2 books, rather than many). Add enrichment, if time permits. Supplement with related field trips, art activities, and read-aloud sessions with Memoria Press as your anchor.



          Whether you select core, customized core, or individual materials, if you add the above suggestions along with those in Simply Classical, your daughter will receive a very strong education!

          If you have any more questions, feel free to ask.

          Thanks-
          Cheryl

          Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

          Simply Classical Curriculum - more levels to come

          Comment

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