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Coloring in Level B

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    Coloring in Level B

    My 4 yr old is on his 1st week of Level B. When it comes to the coloring pages he really shuts down. He will sit there for a while ( I am sitting with him) and try to color but he doesn't do much. He tries and makes some coloring marks. Is this something other kiddos do? I encourage him to color and show him how. He has good pencil hold and loves his new crayons and pencils. He says he colored the picture but it isn't colored in. What should my expectations be for a boy at this age?

    I suspect sensory issues, ADHD, and some fine motor delay. I have been gently working on fine motor this past year with him. He can hold a crayon and pencil correctly and his drawing consist of people. Circle for a head, two legs, and two eyes. We are just starting testing process for my 9 yr old son who is a struggling reader.
    Thank you!

    #2
    Originally posted by scampbell2003 View Post
    My 4 yr old is on his 1st week of Level B. When it comes to the coloring pages he really shuts down. He will sit there for a while ( I am sitting with him) and try to color but he doesn't do much. He tries and makes some coloring marks. Is this something other kiddos do? I encourage him to color and show him how. He has good pencil hold and loves his new crayons and pencils. He says he colored the picture but it isn't colored in. What should my expectations be for a boy at this age?

    I suspect sensory issues, ADHD, and some fine motor delay. I have been gently working on fine motor this past year with him. He can hold a crayon and pencil correctly and his drawing consist of people. Circle for a head, two legs, and two eyes. We are just starting testing process for my 9 yr old son who is a struggling reader.
    Thank you!

    Good morning!

    It is good to hear that you are sitting with him. I would begin coloring with him too. Make it fun. "Let's color the brown bear next. Let's see if we can color the bear with no white spots left." You can assist him hand-over-hand, or color next to him, if he prefers this. Many dismiss coloring as unnecessary, but the daily muscle memory of coloring can help his fine-motor skills. The act of coloring can be calming for his sensory issues. And the discipline of persevering with you to truly "finish" the page can assist his ADHD tendencies.


    Your description of a "portrait" made me smile. At about 4, when other children drew complex people, my Michelle proudly drew two legs extending directly from a smiling circle.


    Keep one or two of these early drawings in a folder to create a portfolio, because I think you will see improvement over the next year.

    Consider setting aside a little time each week (Friday?) for drawing people. Try any or all of these during the 10-15 minute sessions:

    - Create a life-size tracing of him with chalk on the driveway or on paper. Trace around his head, his neck, his arms, his legs. Explain as you draw. "Your neck is below your head. Your right arm has a shoulder, an elbow, and a hand. Here is your waist. Your right leg has a hip, a knee, and a foot...." Have him look at the drawing when you finish. Then have him trace you.
    - Play "Head, Shoulders, Knees, & Toes" to emphasize body parts.
    - Make people out of clay or playdough. Your 9yo could be a model for these sessions!
    - Find an action figure or doll. Have him hold the doll and examine the anatomical structure. Trace the doll. Have him try to copy the drawing.
    - Have him draw each member of the family. Before he draws, remind him: Remember, Daddy has two arms. We need to draw his arms.

    In all of these, you will not seek perfection, just a little more attention to detail. In all of this, whether the drawings or the coloring, you're just nudging him a little further along each week. If you would like, you can check the front your SC Curriculum Guide for additional fine-motor suggestions.


    Yes, full evaluations for both children will help. Congratulations on achieving a proper pencil grip!

    Keep us posted.

    Cheryl

    Comment


      #3
      Thank you Cheryl! You are such an encouragement to me! I'm starting to feel overwhelmed by it all. I'm praying for strength. He is faithful.🙏🏻 I have four kids and I'm trying to figure out the best schedule for all of them. It's exhausting trying to figure it all out. My brain hurts lol! I'm so glad my little guys portrait made you smile! He is such a sweet and caring boy! He is loving his school time with mom! Thank you again!

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Coloring in Level B

        Thank you Cheryl for having me color with him and having him finish his coloring. He has made much improvement! He just turned 5 on December 6th and for the first time he colored with his 11 year old sister for fun. He was so proud of himself. I haven't been working on drawing people with him but I think we will try to work at that this winter.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Coloring in Level B

          Originally posted by scampbell2003 View Post
          Thank you Cheryl for having me color with him and having him finish his coloring. He has made much improvement! He just turned 5 on December 6th and for the first time he colored with his 11 year old sister for fun. He was so proud of himself. I haven't been working on drawing people with him but I think we will try to work at that this winter.
          I can relate to this very well! When we started with my oldest in Level C he was so uninterested and literal that in a color-by-letter picture, if I asked him to color in all the A's, he would LITERALLY color in all the A's, just the A's and nothing but the A's! It was pretty funny (and frustrating). But we kept at it.

          Now, a year and-a-half later, he is in Level 1 and LOVES to color. He "borrows" his sister's coloring books and colors them in (beautifully) and he is finally starting to draw complex pictures and characters! (He's 7 and a half.) He draws and colors snowmen (and snow families!) with coal eyes and mouths, carrot noses, coal buttons, stick arms (with forks), scarves, hats, coats -- the works.

          So keep at it! You will see more and more improvement and interest as he matures. Promise.
          Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
          Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
          Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
          Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

          “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
          ~Pope St John Paul II

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Coloring in Level B

            Thank you Anita!

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Coloring in Level B

              I would say patiently encourage him to color slightly more than he wants to each time. We are only on week 7 and already he went from maybe lightly coloring one tiny thing to coloring a whole page. It depends on the day, but I always try to get him slightly out of his comfort zone. I know you already got great advice, but I thought a comment from another mom in the trenches couldn't hurt. )

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Coloring in Level B

                I am glad he is making progress but HE IS 4. Teaching and expecting 4 year olds to do a lot is a resent trend. Boys did not even start attending school until 8-9 yrs. old. At what age did a classical education begin in the past? When I was in kindergarten (age5) we learned numbers, letters, not reading, how to trace and cut out shapes, etc. I do not think the 40-50 yr. olds today are highly under educated. Starting early does not always mean better or that they will get farther. I have twin boys. One who was reading by the end of kindergarten and one who did not really read until second grade. The early reader hates to read and my late reader reads all the time. Relax and let him be a 4 year old.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Coloring in Level B

                  Originally posted by AKD.Lee View Post
                  I am glad he is making progress but HE IS 4. Teaching and expecting 4 year olds to do a lot is a resent trend. Boys did not even start attending school until 8-9 yrs. old. At what age did a classical education begin in the past? When I was in kindergarten (age5) we learned numbers, letters, not reading, how to trace and cut out shapes, etc. I do not think the 40-50 yr. olds today are highly under educated. Starting early does not always mean better or that they will get farther. I have twin boys. One who was reading by the end of kindergarten and one who did not really read until second grade. The early reader hates to read and my late reader reads all the time. Relax and let him be a 4 year old.
                  He is 5 now. I have a 6th grader, a 3rd grader who is dyslexic and requires a lot of instruction, a 5 yr old and a two year, also pregnant with number 5. The 9, 5, and 2 year old are all boys with high energy so I don't have time to push my 5 year at all. However when my 11 and 9 year old were 3 and 5 they loved coloring and puzzles. This particular child doesn't. Since I already have a struggling child I want to make sure the time I do spend with him, little it is, is spent on areas he needs help with. Using SC has been a way for me to actually give my little one some quality attention other than reading at bedtime. I spend a lot of my day between 3rd and 6th grade. First thing in the morning while my older two do their devotions I spend in a morning time with my 5 and 2 year old using SC. Then they go play. I work on skill work for about 15 mins with my 5 yr old in the afternoon.
                  As far as reading goes my oldest was reading at 4 and my 9 year old is having to work extremely hard just learning to read. Oldest loves to read and my 9 yr old likes to be read too and doesn't like reading much. Every child is different and has different abilities. As parents we love our children and God gives us wisdom for each of them.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Coloring in Level B

                    Originally posted by scampbell2003 View Post
                    As parents we love our children and God gives us wisdom for each of them.
                    Well said. We fully intend to give our special-needs children ample time for playing, singing, dancing, twirling, climbing, running, jumping, enjoying the outdoors, and being a good friend to others. However, we also appreciate the efficacy of early intervention for children with special needs.

                    The SC readiness assessments were carefully designed to prevent overloading our children or teaching them in ways for which they are not ready. (This would include teaching reading too early.) Perhaps for this reason, one of the most common descriptions of the SC Curriculum is "gentle."

                    When we recommend "coming alongside" a child to color with him, this can certainly be an age-appropriate, encouraging endeavor to the satisfaction of both parent and child.


                    Even so, AKD.Lee's caution remains a good one. Sometimes we become so school-oriented or therapy-focused, we forget to snuggle, read a good book for the enjoyment of it, or just go bake cupcakes.



                    I commend scampbell2003, Anita, MaggieAnnie, and all those "in the trenches" of difficult, efficacious, and sometimes even beautiful therapeutic interventions with little ones whose special needs prevent us from waiting to help them.

                    Thanks-
                    Cheryl

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Coloring in Level B

                      Cheryl already had a perfect, peacemaking answer, but of course I have two more cents..lol. Encouraging coloring is a far cry from pressing young children into full scholarship. Most of the SC program is good quality reading time or similar. While school often started at a much later age, heavy work and chores started very early. This developed muscles that was needed for writing. In lieu of making my 4 year old churn butter or collect pounds of cow dung in wheel barrels, I have no problem pushing him out if his comfort zone a bit to make him color so that when he's a few years older he is ready for school.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Coloring in Level B

                        Originally posted by cherylswope View Post

                        Even so, AKD.Lee's caution remains a good one. Sometimes we become so school-oriented or therapy-focused, we forget to snuggle, read a good book for the enjoyment of it, or just go bake cupcakes.

                        I commend scampbell2003, Anita, MaggieAnnie, and all those "in the trenches" of difficult, efficacious, and sometimes even beautiful therapeutic interventions with little ones whose special needs prevent us from waiting to help them.

                        Thanks-
                        Cheryl
                        We didn't bake cupcakes but right before Christmas I read Jan Brett's Gingerbread Baby to my little boys and a couple days later they helped me make gingerbread baby cookies. We had such a wonderful time. I wish I could share a picture. They were so happy and proud to share with their big siblings. So sweet! Hope everyone has a wonderful New Year! I look back on the past year and thank God for the many blessings he has given. It hasn't been an easy year but I love seeing Him work. He is faithful.

                        Comment

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