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SC Level 2

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    SC Level 2

    I know you all just got level 1 out, but I was wondering if there was an ETA or is it more in the hope stage of planning? You all do such an amazing job at Memoria Press, and I know it gets very hectic with all the many projects.

    The Sprout will turn seven this summer. He's working through the MPK program right now, but I am really interested in moving him over to SC for first grade, because of the therapy built in and the literature guides. It looks to me like Level 1 would be a lot of repeating for him and more of a Kindergarten level.


    An update on him: We're still in the first semester of MPK due to the handwriting and the reading. We have finally convinced him to wear his glasses all the time and it is making a difference for the better with his homework. He has amblyopia so the right eye prescription is +.50 and the left is +2. He's not severely impaired, but it's enough to make it pretty hard to see the details of letters. We finally mostly made it past the perfectionism after 15 months or so. Now he will at least attempt everything on the page without a meltdown if his isn't perfect, and he can handle about an hour of school work a day before he gets overwhelmed.

    He started speech therapy half in a regular setting and half with hippotherapy. That has had some amazing results. At the first session, he tolerated the helmet and belt being put on and the new therapist talking to him with no more than agitated pacing (he tends to forcefully withdraw or even lash out to get away from new people talking to him or touching him), got on the horse and after a couple of laps he chattered at them like he was at home. Then afterward he asked to talk to my mom on the phone, and talked for about five minutes. He hasn't been willing to talk to anyone on the phone beyond shouting bye in the general direction of the mouthpiece for at least 18 months. After he had handed me the phone back he noticed that he had not said bye and asked for the phone back and she got him to repeat 'Bye, love you!' that was kind of shouted in a not so nice tone of voice, but I honestly can't remember the last time I heard him willing to repeat it at all. I was completely sold on the value of hippotherapy! The only downside is it tends to leave him in sensory overload for an hour or two afterward, and for some reason it involves an extreme need to chew. He's never been an oral sensory seeker, so we've had to order some things for him to safely chew on. We got him a package of Pop Rocks today while we were shopping and that worked wonders on him.

    We had a counseling intake with a psychologist yesterday to help us pick apart some of his behaviors. He is very, very smart and has such a contrast between his general language skills (about a 12 year old level) and his pragmatic language skills (less than a 3 year old level) that he often sounds like he is perfectly aware of the implications of what he is saying or doing on the surface, but a little digging often shows that he is quoting something or in some other way doesn't understand. His grasp of the idea that other people are people (and not whatever toddlers see them as) is shaky at best. That combined with the advanced vocabulary and syntax make for a lot of people thinking he is purely being mean or rude or purposefully annoying (his stimming lately has centered on vocal things. His brothers are ready to never hear the word cat again, I think.) I have a lot of trouble picking it apart at times, because I know there are times that like any other kid, he misbehaves, so this counselor is supposed to help us pick that apart and to help us with specific behaviors-even if they are related to to the delays he can learn by rote some better/more socially acceptable behaviors.

    Anyway, after the interview she said she was confident in recommending the diagnosis of autism for the psychiatrist to sign off on. So finally we have that diagnosis, and soon it will be on paper. It should open up access to social skills groups/training. We had already done a pretty good job of getting the other individual areas seen to. He goes to two hours a week of OT, and 90 minutes of Speech. His PT score was just high enough that he didn't qualify as a six year old, but the therapist said to bring him back when he turns 7, because the test standards have a large jump and his same scores that don't qualify now will qualify in July.
    Miah - married to Warcabbage, 3 boys, BS in social work, AS in Electrical Engineering Technology

    Evulcarrot - 18, freshman in college, Medical Technology , mild autism
    Battlebroccoli - 17, lives with grandma, attends a special high school program part time
    Doomsprout - 10, highly verbal moderate autism, anxiety, motor delays, sensory processing issues - SC 4 with R&S 4

    #2
    Hi, Miah. Thanks for the wonderful update!

    We do not have a firm ETA for SC2, but we're working hard and have some exciting new components.

    When we are closer to completion, I'll post a target publication date.

    Keep up the good work there!

    Thanks-
    Cheryl

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      #3
      Originally posted by Miah View Post
      I know you all just got level 1 out, but I was wondering if there was an ETA or is it more in the hope stage of planning? You all do such an amazing job at Memoria Press, and I know it gets very hectic with all the many projects.

      The Sprout will turn seven this summer. He's working through the MPK program right now, but I am really interested in moving him over to SC for first grade, because of the therapy built in and the literature guides. It looks to me like Level 1 would be a lot of repeating for him and more of a Kindergarten level.


      An update on him: We're still in the first semester of MPK due to the handwriting and the reading. We have finally convinced him to wear his glasses all the time and it is making a difference for the better with his homework. He has amblyopia so the right eye prescription is +.50 and the left is +2. He's not severely impaired, but it's enough to make it pretty hard to see the details of letters. We finally mostly made it past the perfectionism after 15 months or so. Now he will at least attempt everything on the page without a meltdown if his isn't perfect, and he can handle about an hour of school work a day before he gets overwhelmed.

      He started speech therapy half in a regular setting and half with hippotherapy. That has had some amazing results. At the first session, he tolerated the helmet and belt being put on and the new therapist talking to him with no more than agitated pacing (he tends to forcefully withdraw or even lash out to get away from new people talking to him or touching him), got on the horse and after a couple of laps he chattered at them like he was at home. Then afterward he asked to talk to my mom on the phone, and talked for about five minutes. He hasn't been willing to talk to anyone on the phone beyond shouting bye in the general direction of the mouthpiece for at least 18 months. After he had handed me the phone back he noticed that he had not said bye and asked for the phone back and she got him to repeat 'Bye, love you!' that was kind of shouted in a not so nice tone of voice, but I honestly can't remember the last time I heard him willing to repeat it at all. I was completely sold on the value of hippotherapy! The only downside is it tends to leave him in sensory overload for an hour or two afterward, and for some reason it involves an extreme need to chew. He's never been an oral sensory seeker, so we've had to order some things for him to safely chew on. We got him a package of Pop Rocks today while we were shopping and that worked wonders on him.

      We had a counseling intake with a psychologist yesterday to help us pick apart some of his behaviors. He is very, very smart and has such a contrast between his general language skills (about a 12 year old level) and his pragmatic language skills (less than a 3 year old level) that he often sounds like he is perfectly aware of the implications of what he is saying or doing on the surface, but a little digging often shows that he is quoting something or in some other way doesn't understand. His grasp of the idea that other people are people (and not whatever toddlers see them as) is shaky at best. That combined with the advanced vocabulary and syntax make for a lot of people thinking he is purely being mean or rude or purposefully annoying (his stimming lately has centered on vocal things. His brothers are ready to never hear the word cat again, I think.) I have a lot of trouble picking it apart at times, because I know there are times that like any other kid, he misbehaves, so this counselor is supposed to help us pick that apart and to help us with specific behaviors-even if they are related to to the delays he can learn by rote some better/more socially acceptable behaviors.

      Anyway, after the interview she said she was confident in recommending the diagnosis of autism for the psychiatrist to sign off on. So finally we have that diagnosis, and soon it will be on paper. It should open up access to social skills groups/training. We had already done a pretty good job of getting the other individual areas seen to. He goes to two hours a week of OT, and 90 minutes of Speech. His PT score was just high enough that he didn't qualify as a six year old, but the therapist said to bring him back when he turns 7, because the test standards have a large jump and his same scores that don't qualify now will qualify in July.

      Hi, Miah.

      I first answered by typing on my small phone at the massive convention in Cincinnati last week!

      Now that I am home, I wanted to elaborate on your update:

      You have done SO much, Miah, for your little Sprout in the short time we have "known" you! You now have a diagnosis of autism with new opportunities, both for understanding his needs and for obtaining good services.

      You have secured for him all of the following: Speech, OT, hippotherapy, and possibly PT this summer.

      Not only this, but he is also less rigid/perfectionistic with himself. And he is now wearing his glasses!

      Congratulations to your son and to you!!


      If you have time to address even more areas, such as pragmatic language and social understanding, you might consider weaving more Social Stories into his life. This can help teach some of the ideas you mentioned:

      -the personhood of others
      -the need to say a favorite word only ONCE in a sentence or story
      -the unintended appearance of rudeness and the resulting need for extra politeness
      -using a quiet phone voice for the sake of Grandma's ears. [Although if your mother is like mine, "Bye, love you!" was music to her ears at any volume. ]


      We will keep you posted on SC Level 2.

      Thanks again -

      Cheryl


      Simply Classical - the book - with tips on adapting MP for special needs

      Simply Classical - the new curriculum for special needs

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