Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

Son has Dyslexia

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Son has Dyslexia

    My son was evaluated by the public school in our area two years ago, and they concluded that he has dyslexia. They were very supportive of my homeschooling and did not try to push anything on me. I have been homeschooling for 8 years, and have yet to find a homeschool curriculum that fits my family. My son is 9 and suppose to be going into the 4th grade this fall. I also have a daughter going into 8th grade and a daughter starting kindergarten. We are still using a kindergarten curriculum for my son's reading and a first grade curriculum for math. He is very good at math I have just chosen to keep it simple for him until he can read. This year we started a Classical Conversations community in our area, and we love it. My son loves memorizing all the history sentences. I was wanting a curriculum that was based on the classical model of learning. I am concerned that it will be to hard for my son. Do you have any suggestions?

    #2
    Originally posted by DLMABK View Post
    My son was evaluated by the public school in our area two years ago, and they concluded that he has dyslexia. They were very supportive of my homeschooling and did not try to push anything on me. I have been homeschooling for 8 years, and have yet to find a homeschool curriculum that fits my family. My son is 9 and suppose to be going into the 4th grade this fall. I also have a daughter going into 8th grade and a daughter starting kindergarten. We are still using a kindergarten curriculum for my son's reading and a first grade curriculum for math. He is very good at math I have just chosen to keep it simple for him until he can read. This year we started a Classical Conversations community in our area, and we love it. My son loves memorizing all the history sentences. I was wanting a curriculum that was based on the classical model of learning. I am concerned that it will be to hard for my son. Do you have any suggestions?

    Yes, be encouraged! You can most certainly tailor a classical education to nurture your son's strengths, even as you endeavor to remediate his areas of weakness and accommodate for his limitations.

    You are not alone in your concern. Decades of talks on caricatured "types" of education leave some with a mistaken notion that classical education is only for bookish types. A quick glance at a classical education publisher's catalogs does little to dissuade this notion! After all, given the rather dismal and overly pragmatic approach to education even for average students, "classical" content in catalogs is often more advanced than we learned ourselves. See this article.


    However, you CAN teach strong, beautiful content at your child's own level. If you cannot find an effective all-in-one curriculum, simply find good components to teach your son and create your own classical curriculum for him. This is what we attempted with my own twins (autism, mental illness, learning disabilities) when they were your son's age.

    By selecting slightly higher content but requiring responses at his ability level (and stretching this level over time), you can teach beginning Latin, history, science, Greek & Latin roots, English grammar, elements of logic & rhetoric, writing, music, art, and more. Your son can also read (or listen to) good literature, and he can engage in good Socratic discussions. You can do this!

    The first key for your son will be unlocking his reading. However, even as you address his reading, you can give him a good classical education.

    We do not have anything specifically for dyslexia remediation, nor do we conduct testing or diagnose. Because public school testing occurred two years ago, you might want to obtain a thorough psychoeducational or neuropsychologist's evaluation for your son with a specific request to examine his reading, processing abilities, and other aspects of his learning. You can also ask specifically to confirm (or refute) the diagnosis of dyslexia and request recommendations to help him learn to read.


    A few questions for you:

    1. Has your son received any support for his reading difficulties (e.g., special remediation, tutoring, reading programs for dyslexia)?
    2. Which reading program are you currently using? Which reading programs have you tried so far?
    3. Do you feel he is progressing steadily in reading with the current program?
    4. How discouraged is he with his reading abilities at this point?
    5. How well does he print?

    [A side note - if you are not familiar with these websites as you consider an individualized evaluation, you might appreciate some of the free videos helpful here or helpful content here.]


    ...

    We currently offer an all-in-one program with explicit phonics instruction and additional multisensory techniques to assist reading. We include a step-by-step mastery approach to arithmetic and recitations, along with content in science, literature, art, music, and more. See what you think of this: Simply Classical Curriculum Level 1: Sentences, Sums, & Stories. Even if your son requires a substituted reading program, such as one developed specifically for children with dyslexia, you will be able to see in the above link how we designed a curriculum to allow challenged learners to receive content and teaching to reflect the true, the good, and the beautiful.


    You might also enjoy this article:
    Can I Really Do This?


    Many parents have chosen a Christian liberal arts education for their special-needs and struggling students alongside remediation and therapies. If we can help in any way, please let us know!

    Cheryl

    Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child


    cherylswope.com
    Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child (Memoria Press)

    SimplyClassical.com -- catalog, curriculum, book

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by DLMABK View Post
      My son was evaluated by the public school in our area two years ago, and they concluded that he has dyslexia. They were very supportive of my homeschooling and did not try to push anything on me. I have been homeschooling for 8 years, and have yet to find a homeschool curriculum that fits my family. My son is 9 and suppose to be going into the 4th grade this fall. I also have a daughter going into 8th grade and a daughter starting kindergarten. We are still using a kindergarten curriculum for my son's reading and a first grade curriculum for math. He is very good at math I have just chosen to keep it simple for him until he can read. This year we started a Classical Conversations community in our area, and we love it. My son loves memorizing all the history sentences. I was wanting a curriculum that was based on the classical model of learning. I am concerned that it will be to hard for my son. Do you have any suggestions?
      Hi, my daughter is dyslexic too so your post caught my eye She was 11 and in 5th grade and reading on a 1st grade level even after lots of 'remediation' via computer at the school (computer remediation for anyone is silly but especially a deaf dyslexic, lol!) so we were in much the same place as you a couple years ago!

      First, many dyslexics are quite good at math and most are at least slightly better in math than in reading. Since the two do not affect each other (unlike say reading for social studies) I would allow him to go as high as he wants in math so he can start to experience success and realize how intelligent he truly is. Since he's already 3 grades behind I would work on math through this summer and next (just 30 minutes a day of math work in the summer is what our neuropsych recommended to us to maintain progress and give these kids extra time to catch up) and aim to complete Second Grade and Third Grade math over the next year so he can be caught up close to grade level since he's good at math.

      I've been hearing more and more from other parents of dyslexic kiddos that their kids LOVE Classical Conversations! It's so funny, they just adore memorizing those history things. It's wonderful your son likes it and is learning lots. I definitely think it's possible and worthwhile to give a classical education to children with learning differences, just look at Cheryl's amazing twins!

      Also, I wonder what program you're using to remediate his dyslexia? I could be wrong but it sounded from your post like maybe you thought he couldn't learn to read well because of the dyslexia and many schools do say to parents that but it's not true. If you use an Orton-Gillingham program to remediate he can be reading on grade level in just 2-3 years easily. Mild dyslexia can be remediated through just a solid phonics program but moderate and severe dyslexia (I think any non-reading 4th grader counts as moderate) requires specifically Orton-Gillingham instruction which teaches phonological awareness and then phonics in a very systematic and multi sensory way. A lot of people like All About Reading, though it might be a bit fast for your son (its pace is way faster than many O-G programs). We like Barton Reading and Spelling, it's gotten my daughter (who is dyslexic, intellectually disabled, adhd, slow processing, and deaf) up 2 grade levels in reading in the past year. It's scripted so easy for any parent to implement. I'm also O-G trained now but I still use Barton because I just like it better. We buy one level, then sell it on ebay for a $50 loss roughly, then use that money to buy the next level, and so on. I like that it feels very classical starting in levels 2 and 3 because you do dictation and memory work and grammar. Plus my daughter's working memory went way up after using it. There's also programs like Wilson which is great if you are O-G trained or have access to an O-G tutor. I can't remember the others off the top of my head but there are probably 8 legitimate O-G programs that have been developed over the last 100 years since it was discovered.

      He may always read a bit slower than others and he may have occasional funny spelling mishaps but those shouldn't get in the way of his overall learning and won't get in the way of a classical education if you focus on exposure to quality literature vs quantity. I think Memoria Press' stuff does a good job of not overloading kids with 10 long books a year but instead choosing a few quality books and delving into them at a reasonable pace. And if your son does just 2-3 a year that would be fine too. He can explore them as audiobooks now and once his reading is caught up he can read them independently (when remediating dyslexia you never want to ask them to read any words they haven't been explicitly taught through their O-G program yet because it leads to regression and guessing which is a bad habit). I do history and science aloud with my daughter, that way her reading doesn't hold her back and you could always do the same. CC is pretty good with oral learning which should suit him well. And things like timeline cards for MP or CC would be nice too and give him a visual representation of history, perfect for these right-brained dyslexic kids.

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks for these thoughts! Just a clarification from here:

        My still-very-challenged twins would be quick to point out that they are not amazing; rather, they merely received the benefits of a more bountiful classical education, such as the cultivation of far richer leisure pursuits, than could have been provided from a typical special-education "track" powered by the state. In fact, we just experienced more evidence of this, as my now 20yo daughter recently left her state-funded adult day program. When time permits, I may elaborate in another thread.

        A summary for now: Incline pursuits toward truth, goodness, and beauty, even as you remediate special needs. Trust that the work you are doing in your families is important and truly life-changing work!


        Very good tips from "imagine.more" - thanks for taking the time to post.

        Cheryl
        Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child (Memoria Press)

        SimplyClassical.com -- catalog, curriculum, book

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Son has Dyslexia

          My son (17) has dyslexia. We have always used books on tape to as reading just takes too much out of him. It would take WAY too long to wait for him to read the whole book. We still use the study guides to help build his vocabulary.

          Comment

          Working...
          X