Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

High School for Older Adopted Children

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    High School for Older Adopted Children

    Dear Cheryl,

    This is a follow-up to a post from last fall that I submitted prior to our adoption of four Filipino siblings, now ages 12-16. All four of the children are bright and capable of learning, but have missed a considerable amount of school. They are generally willing to learn and study, but are just behind in everything. Our oldest daughter is eager to begin high school courses, so I am hoping to get her started at that level next fall, at least in some subjects. Meanwhile, she is doing grade 6 English, Reading and Vocabulary, and does okay with some help. She is also working through grade 7 math fairly well. She's an eager student, so that's a big help, but sometimes lacks confidence, and is still developing her English language skills.

    What I'm thinking about, for her at least, is finding some subjects that can be 'doubled-up' to make them high school level. This idea comes from the MP Composition plan for students that are starting composition at an older age/higher grade. Do you think there are ways we can do this with other courses?

    Thanks!
    Theresa

    #2
    Originally posted by TAnnable View Post
    Dear Cheryl,

    This is a follow-up to a post from last fall that I submitted prior to our adoption of four Filipino siblings, now ages 12-16. All four of the children are bright and capable of learning, but have missed a considerable amount of school. They are generally willing to learn and study, but are just behind in everything. Our oldest daughter is eager to begin high school courses, so I am hoping to get her started at that level next fall, at least in some subjects. Meanwhile, she is doing grade 6 English, Reading and Vocabulary, and does okay with some help. She is also working through grade 7 math fairly well. She's an eager student, so that's a big help, but sometimes lacks confidence, and is still developing her English language skills.

    What I'm thinking about, for her at least, is finding some subjects that can be 'doubled-up' to make them high school level. This idea comes from the MP Composition plan for students that are starting composition at an older age/higher grade. Do you think there are ways we can do this with other courses?

    Thanks!
    Theresa

    Hello, Theresa. Yes, I remember your four children! Congratulations on your oldest's level of study and, especially, her eagerness to begin high school work!

    You can definitely streamline her coursework and still design an excellent high school classical Christian education for her. Some quick questions in a somewhat random order:

    -Has she completed any of the Intro Classical Studies or Christian Studies programs?
    -What, if any, MP science resources has she studied?
    -Do you want to combine any of your other children with her?

    -Does she evidence any learning disabilities, or do you think her delay is due only to her previous lack of opportunity?
    -What are you currently using for Math & English? Do you want to continue with these programs?
    -Which areas (e.g., history, science, literature, music) does she most enjoy studying?

    -Does she learn more effectively by reading or by listening?
    -How is her writing?

    -Do you intend to have her graduate at 18, or will you be able to delay graduation?
    -If 18, what do you anticipate she will do upon graduation?


    If you have time to answer any or all of the above, this will be very helpful. Then we can try to outline a plan for her.

    Thanks-
    Cheryl


    Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child


    Memoria Press - Classical Christian Education for All Ages

    Comment


      #3
      Thank you, Cheryl!

      Our daughter is currently doing her work with Seton, a Catholic home study program, right now.

      Science is the one major subject we have not started with her yet.

      We may possibly want to combine her with one or two of the other girls. Her sister, soon to be 15, is quite bright, but one year behind in school terms. She is content where she is and isn't expecting to do high school yet but it would be very nice if we could. Another daughter is ready for her first year of high school next fall. (She's been with us for 3 years.) She is doing mostly grade 8 work in the Catholic Seton program. But she uses MP French and it works well for her. She also has a strong interest in classical music, so I have been considering a more classical approach with her for high school.

      I can't see any evidence of learning disabilities, other than lack of opportunity and the need for continued English language development.

      She is using Teaching Textbook math (textbook only) and Seton English. When she completes these courses, we are open to other suggestions.

      When she first came here, she said history and English were her favorite areas of study. But she was learning in her native language. Now she says vocabulary and reading comprehension are her favorites. She likes workbooks and concrete learning, and since everything is new in some ways, she's still trying to figure out what her interests are.

      She seems to do well with both reading and by listening, but she definitely likes to 'quiz' aloud with me or with her siblings. (She's also amazingly focused in noisy environments - probably from her experience in a big orphanage)

      I think her writing is generally good, considering English isn't her first language. When she was first here, I would write partial sentences on the board for the children to complete, i.e., "My favorite day of the week is (blank) because (blank) " or "I pray for (blank) ", etc. and she frequently wrote multiple responses, in complete sentences and with just slight grammar errors. However, now that she's writing structured paragraphs, she lacks some confidene and sometimes struggles to put her thoughts down. But she can put together sentences and ideas fairly well with some help.

      She knows that high school in the U.S. is four years, and right now she is accepting of the idea. But realistically, we won't be surprised if she is wannting to move on by age 19 (as her older sister did).

      When she completes her high school courses, we plan for her to attend a nearby community college for her first two years and then probably on to the local sate university to complete her bachelor's degree. Her career ideas are either pre-K/K teacher (she likes school and young children) or possibly something in tourism. She was blessed to meet many missionary volunteers from all over the world at her orphanage, and often had nice friendships with them. So the idea of missionary/tourism work is appealing to her.

      We look forward to hearing from you and thanks again!

      Theresa

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by TAnnable View Post
        Dear Cheryl,

        This is a follow-up to a post from last fall that I submitted prior to our adoption of four Filipino siblings, now ages 12-16. All four of the children are bright and capable of learning, but have missed a considerable amount of school. They are generally willing to learn and study, but are just behind in everything. Our oldest daughter is eager to begin high school courses, so I am hoping to get her started at that level next fall, at least in some subjects. Meanwhile, she is doing grade 6 English, Reading and Vocabulary, and does okay with some help. She is also working through grade 7 math fairly well. She's an eager student, so that's a big help, but sometimes lacks confidence, and is still developing her English language skills.

        What I'm thinking about, for her at least, is finding some subjects that can be 'doubled-up' to make them high school level. This idea comes from the MP Composition plan for students that are starting composition at an older age/higher grade. Do you think there are ways we can do this with other courses?

        Thanks!
        Theresa

        Hi, Theresa,

        Based on your answers, you have many options! Given your daughter's abilities, you could create combination/catch-up courses in many areas: science, history, classical studies, Latin, music, and more. Some suggestions, if you want to do this:

        1. Classical Composition Fable/Narrative is the only formal catch-up course with lesson plans, but you can rather easily design a program from individual books.

        2. If you wanted to take any given course at a typical pace, you can order customized lesson plans by subject.

        3. If you wanted to combine programs, the easiest plan might be to take a course designed for 7th or 8th and then boost with additional books to elevate the hours & content to the level of high-school coursework.

        Examples:

        Latin - study these in two years or as a one-year combined course for two high school credits total
        First Form Latin, Second Form Latin

        Such a study could assist your daughter's English grammar, language proficiency, comprehension, and preparation to study other languages, all-in-one course. This might also boost her confidence. You might appreciate some of these free online articles on the benefits of Latin study. If you have not yet read Latin-Centered Curriculum, the suggestions in this book might streamline the education of all 4 children.

        As an aside - I spoke with a mother not long ago whose adopted (ESL) son came to her at school age with no literacy in any language. Through Latin study, not only did his knowledge of English grammar and vocabulary improve, but his facility with language increased dramatically. (He recently earned an A in Latin, which gave him even greater confidence!)


        Classical Studies/Literature- With embedded history/literature credits, you could design 1- to 2-year courses from these books. Even if you taught these with primarily oral responses and frequent mini-reports, the combined content could constitute high-school level study.

        1-2 years:
        Ancient Greece - D'Aulaires Greek Myths http://www.memoriapress.com/curricul...es-greek-myths Famous Men of Greece, The Trojan War (first) Homer's Iliad & Odyssey (second) (DVD recommended)

        1-2 years:
        Ancient Rome - (alongside FFL & SFL) Famous Men of Rome, Classical Studies Flash Cards for Famous Men of Rome, Book of the Ancient Romans, The Aeneid for Boys & Girls (first), The Aeneid (second)

        Ancient Rome & Ancient Greece will prepare her for studies in American History & Government.

        Drawing/History
        For visual reference and to allow for your younger students to join the studies, you might utilize the Timeline Program. She could quiz her siblings with the flash cards (and simultaneously learn the material herself!).


        You could design something similar from any of the resources in the 7th & 8th core. The key principles:

        1. Select some lower-level content to "catch up" her knowledge.
        2. Limit written requirements (e.g., literature study guides). Instead, teach non-fiction writing through brief topical reports.
        3. Efficiently combine subject areas as suggested above, so her schedule is not overloaded but is streamlined from these combo courses.

        Does this sound like what you envisioned? If so, you could do this with science and other areas.


        These two threads & others from the MP 9-12 Form may provide more examples for you:

        Coming to Classical Studies in High School

        Ever Too Late?



        Congratulations on everything she has already accomplished! Feel free to follow up here or on the 9-12 Forum, if you would like a "sounding board" for designing your own combination courses.

        Thanks-
        Cheryl


        Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child


        cherylswope.com

        Comment

        Working...
        X