Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

Dry Erase Board/daily Routines Advice?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Dry Erase Board/daily Routines Advice?

    I'm thinking that I need to invest in a dry erase board again (I last had one on an easel and my kids destroyed it) so planning on a hanging one this time. I'm looking for advice in how to best utilize a dry erase board for our daily schoolwork. Also looking for advice in trying to get a forgiving yet clear routine going again as this continues to be difficult because we don't always know when one of our children will be "off." I cannot give the "off" child a cd player or books unless they are calm enough/self-regulated as they've damaged school supplies before. Once calm I could do that kind of "station" or activity as long as they are in the supervised space.

    It's about time for me to re-read your lovely book another time as I find myself doing periodically because I'm feeling very frustrated at our progress this year as I feel like last year was more productive and my oldest two with their specila struggles...well, it feels like it is harder to get work done with them this year as they have many off days. Perhaps this is related to the school work but it doesn't seem to happen after school work but rather in response to being corrected or getting caught doing something/lying even though due to their brain injuries my parenting strategies with them accommodate them not understanding cause/effect very well.

    I admit I get concerned because my bright almost-8-year-old son ends up being affected on these hard days and doesn't get as much done but I'm trying to extend myself grace because I know he's doing well with his reading and my gut feeling is his reading will take off even more soon allowing him to do more work/reading independently on days when I'm having to give more attention to the challenges of my oldest two.

    heather

    #2
    My son (8) really likes to see his checklist on the dry erase board. It helps him to settle and get going

    I think he mostly likes checking off things he has completed!

    We also take breaks where we play with my daughter (7) who is blind. We do really physical massages and "making a pizza " (piling blocks on top of her and rolling her around). It seems to help settle everyone, get the wiggles out, and reboot for better learning.

    It's a zoo around here!

    Comment


      #3
      We also use the dry erase board to compose answers to some of the workbook questions. Then he copies them into his workbook.

      And my dyslexic 16 year old uses it for math. Saves on paper.

      We obviously need another white board!

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by HeatherB View Post
        I'm thinking that I need to invest in a dry erase board again (I last had one on an easel and my kids destroyed it) so planning on a hanging one this time. I'm looking for advice in how to best utilize a dry erase board for our daily schoolwork. Also looking for advice in trying to get a forgiving yet clear routine going again as this continues to be difficult because we don't always know when one of our children will be "off." I cannot give the "off" child a cd player or books unless they are calm enough/self-regulated as they've damaged school supplies before. Once calm I could do that kind of "station" or activity as long as they are in the supervised space.

        It's about time for me to re-read your lovely book another time as I find myself doing periodically because I'm feeling very frustrated at our progress this year as I feel like last year was more productive and my oldest two with their specila struggles...well, it feels like it is harder to get work done with them this year as they have many off days. Perhaps this is related to the school work but it doesn't seem to happen after school work but rather in response to being corrected or getting caught doing something/lying even though due to their brain injuries my parenting strategies with them accommodate them not understanding cause/effect very well.

        I admit I get concerned because my bright almost-8-year-old son ends up being affected on these hard days and doesn't get as much done but I'm trying to extend myself grace because I know he's doing well with his reading and my gut feeling is his reading will take off even more soon allowing him to do more work/reading independently on days when I'm having to give more attention to the challenges of my oldest two.

        heather

        Hi, Heather.

        Our large white board hangs on the wall. My husband secured it on all four corners. We place our daily schedule on the board, along with the weekly schedule to place the day in a context. I also list our every-week chores, such as "Monday - strip & remake beds." This helps everyone see expected tasks & keeps chore completion more objective.

        Given so many "off" days right now, you might try posting a routine of tasks to accomplish, rather than a schedule by the clock. Even so, a caveat: I found it a little dangerous to grant entire days off, because any excuse began to serve as an "off" day.

        If you can give a short break for the student to regroup but remind him the tasks remain, this might help. For example, post 4 non-negotiable tasks: reading, math, Latin, outdoor exercise. As Kim suggested, place a blank (or box) for a checklist for these. They must be completed by 3pm or ... [reasonable consequence]. When someone has a rough hour or a difficult morning, be sure that your conducted lessons are especially enjoyable & interesting for the remaining students. Not only will this reward the engaged children who remain, but this might help motivate the student who received the day off. More than anything, you have to work hard at not rewarding the students who have "off" days.

        After the 4 non-negotiables, you might list 3 desired tasks. Provide incentives for completion of these that cannot be earned otherwise (e.g., screen time for completing all 7). You want your students to be far more motivated to complete their tasks than to take a day off!

        You might even develop different systems for different children. My daughter worked very eagerly for incentives. She loved to check off boxes and receive her earned incentive. My son did not. For such a child as my son, consider having expected tasks carry over to the next day whenever someone takes a break. This changed my son's motivation more quickly than any incentives I ever attempted!



        More to consider - Which tasks do you want to see completed every day, no matter what? What qualifies as an "off" hour, morning, or afternoon? [I remember once setting a fever as the criteria for a full day off. Otherwise the slightest sniffles, the need of changed medication dosage, or just feeling "funny in my head" became surprisingly frequent greetings in the morning!] You do not want to reward a pattern of imagined or exaggerated somatic symptoms. If someone has consistently "off" days, this might warrant a visit to a medical professional. As mentioned on another thread, the onset of spring can sometimes affect children with underlying difficulties.


        All of this will take some thinking & planning. It sounds like you're ready to do some "spring cleaning" with your current routine. This may be a good time to reassess, so you can break any ineffective patterns & develop some new strategies. If you need more ideas, feel free to ask!

        Cheryl


        Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

        cherylswope.com

        Comment


          #5
          re: Dry Erase Board/daily Routines Advice?

          Thank you for advice! When I mean "off" I mean disregulated. I am not sure if I made that clear. Not that they are getting a break from work but rather it is hard to get them to participate in school if they are disregulated/having tantrums and can't focus.


          Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
          Hi, Heather.

          Our large white board hangs on the wall. My husband secured it on all four corners. We place our daily schedule on the board, along with the weekly schedule to place the day in a context. I also list our every-week chores, such as "Monday - strip & remake beds." This helps everyone see expected tasks & keeps chore completion more objective.

          Given so many "off" days right now, you might try posting a routine of tasks to accomplish, rather than a schedule by the clock. Even so, a caveat: I found it a little dangerous to grant entire days off, because any excuse began to serve as an "off" day.

          If you can give a short break for the student to regroup but remind him the tasks remain, this might help. For example, post 4 non-negotiable tasks: reading, math, Latin, outdoor exercise. As Kim suggested, place a blank (or box) for a checklist for these. They must be completed by 3pm or ... [reasonable consequence]. When someone has a rough hour or a difficult morning, be sure that your conducted lessons are especially enjoyable & interesting for the remaining students. Not only will this reward the engaged children who remain, but this might help motivate the student who received the day off. More than anything, you have to work hard at not rewarding the students who have "off" days.

          After the 4 non-negotiables, you might list 3 desired tasks. Provide incentives for completion of these that cannot be earned otherwise (e.g., screen time for completing all 7). You want your students to be far more motivated to complete their tasks than to take a day off!

          You might even develop different systems for different children. My daughter worked very eagerly for incentives. She loved to check off boxes and receive her earned incentive. My son did not. For such a child as my son, consider having expected tasks carry over to the next day whenever someone takes a break. This changed my son's motivation more quickly than any incentives I ever attempted!



          More to consider - Which tasks do you want to see completed every day, no matter what? What qualifies as an "off" hour, morning, or afternoon? [I remember once setting a fever as the criteria for a full day off. Otherwise the slightest sniffles, the need of changed medication dosage, or just feeling "funny in my head" became surprisingly frequent greetings in the morning!] You do not want to reward a pattern of imagined or exaggerated somatic symptoms. If someone has consistently "off" days, this might warrant a visit to a medical professional. As mentioned on another thread, the onset of spring can sometimes affect children with underlying difficulties.


          All of this will take some thinking & planning. It sounds like you're ready to do some "spring cleaning" with your current routine. This may be a good time to reassess, so you can break any ineffective patterns & develop some new strategies. If you need more ideas, feel free to ask!

          Cheryl


          Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

          cherylswope.com

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by HeatherB View Post
            Thank you for advice! When I mean "off" I mean disregulated. I am not sure if I made that clear. Not that they are getting a break from work but rather it is hard to get them to participate in school if they are disregulated/having tantrums and can't focus.

            Thanks for the clarification. The temptation might still exist, if one of the children ever begins to perceive tantrums or inattention as serving himself in some way. You might insert "or behavioral" in this sentence, so it reads, "You do not want to reward a pattern of imagined or exaggerated somatic or behavioral symptoms."


            Perhaps even this is not applicable to your situation. I only offer the caution, because this happened in our home before I realized it. But you might be more careful & aware than I was!


            I hope you can find a good routine with safer, more constructive, and more harmonious ways for everyone to spend each day. (I wish we were back in our all-day session room at last summer's MP conference. We could brainstorm much more effectively for your children in such a setting!)


            Take care, Heather -

            Cheryl

            Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child
            cherylswope.com

            Comment


              #7
              Yes, it makes it more complicated if they are being disregulated and they are aggressive or wound up and it's stressful for the other kids to be around them. At that point, I honestly cannot force them to work and have to work on keeping the other kids calm and removing the other kid until he/she is able to calm down because it is near to impossible to do school work with the other children if that kid is in the room and shouting and making negative statements. oh...this sounds awful when I type it and you are right it would be easier if we could talk face to face. It doesn't feel like I am rewarding the kid acting up as much as trying to keep the other 3 kids not having problems calm, safe and focused on other things (to keep their anxiety level down). hmmm

              Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
              Thanks for the clarification. The temptation might still exist, if one of the children ever begins to perceive tantrums or inattention as serving himself in some way. You might insert "or behavioral" in this sentence, so it reads, "You do not want to reward a pattern of imagined or exaggerated somatic or behavioral symptoms."


              Perhaps even this is not applicable to your situation. I only offer the caution, because this happened in our home before I realized it. But you might be more careful & aware than I was!


              I hope you can find a good routine with safer, more constructive, and more harmonious ways for everyone to spend each day. (I wish we were back in our all-day session room at last summer's MP conference. We could brainstorm much more effectively for your children in such a setting!)


              Take care, Heather -

              Cheryl

              Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child
              cherylswope.com

              Comment


                #8
                I am going to have to come back to reread this and get some ideas.

                Our routine is not going well at all and my special learner ends up getting pushed off to the side more often than not. Or we do the minimum and I don't feel like we are experiencing the richness of the program.

                Working with 3 has me right at the edge of my abilities.

                Comment


                  #9
                  My prayers are with you. I know it is challenging with more than one stuggling learner. Especially when they are resistant to order. I'm going to do some "out-loud thinking" -- I hope you don't mind. This conversation has helped me a lot and maybe you all share some similar struggles...

                  I will have two full-time struggling learners this Fall (Level 1 and Level B) and a three year-old who also needs some assistance (it remains to be seen how much). We all do school together at the kitchen table, but right now my oldest gets the full course load while the younger two listen, draw, look at books or wander off to play and then return when they are curious again. I have introduced Level A to the younger two little by little (as time and energy allows) to get them a bit more engaged and to remediate my oldest, who has a severe language processing disorder. I plan to add a little more each week as we approach formal school to get the younger two ready, sort of like the frog in the pot of water! But I confess, I am a little wary of Fall... Still, today is enough worry for today. Tomorrow will take care of itself, right?

                  The white board conversation is helpful here to me as I try to piece together how I will manage three students. We have done okay without it. My oldest, who needs the most structure, seems to be fine with understanding that sometimes we have to take breaks or run errands or that life "interrupts" and school might not get done in the morning -- it might get done in the afternoon. Or, given the demands of our day, it might not be a "school day" at all. He's fine with that. However... I am finding that as he is getting older and school/household demands are higher and he starts to become more verbal and more aware, that some anxiety has crept in (I posted on this in "Behavioral Issues"). I think the white board will help alleviate some of this. It will help him see what our day looks like; increase his comprehension of sight words; help him understand first, second, third, etc., and time/clock concepts; let him (and the other children) know when it is his turn and when it is someone else's turn; and it will give him a little time to take a break and get up and stretch his legs while the younger children and I work on curriculum -- hopefully he will understand that he has to come back!

                  Here's where I need to reign myself in: I think I have to do everything RIGHT NOW. I also have to do things PERFECTLY. I have stuggled with this my whole life (apples and trees -- my son is like this!). But a visual schedule does not have to be perfect (which is why it's on a white board -- DUH) and it doesn't have to be exhaustive and put in place right this second. It can be simple the first day. Today looks like we are going to the accoutant's office, then we will come home for lunch and then, when the little kids go down for Quiet Time, we will do school. This afternoon will be wonderful weather for a walk. Then dinner. That takes about two minutes to write on the white board. As far as a school schedule is concerned, as we are engaged in lessons, I can either show him the Lesson Plan for the day, or I can simplify it on a piece of paper, interweaving the younger children's lessons as needed. That way he gets used to seeing what is coming. Not fancy, not grand, but useful. As someone much wiser than I once said, "Never let the perfect be the enemy of the good."

                  Now that I have thought "out loud" (and taken up some of your thread space!) it seems much more doable than just some vague goal of "KEEPING A VISUAL SCHEDULE". It calms me down to chunk things down into little bits (as it does my son). I hope this is helpful to you if you are also a worrier. It feels OVERWHELMING sometimes to have struggling learners. But this is God's work and He is in it. He will not leave us to do it alone. Whatever we cannot cover, in our mortal weakness, He supplies overabundantly with grace. Pray for rest and peace. He always gives them. Big hugs.
                  Last edited by Anita; 03-18-2015, 06:05 AM.
                  Boy Wonder: 10, MP2/SC4 (Special Needs)
                  Joy Bubble: 8, MP2 (Special Needs)
                  Snuggly Cowboy: 6, MPK
                  Sweet Lightness: 2, Reverse-Engineering Specialist

                  “Have no fear of moving into the unknown. Simply step out fearlessly knowing that I am with you, therefore no harm can befall you; all is very, very well. Do this in complete faith and confidence.”
                  ~Pope St John Paul II

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X