Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

Two questions regarding the SN levels.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Two questions regarding the SN levels.

    First I am wondering when learning to read starts. I have heard so many different approaches as being successful for students with down syndrome. My daughter is already 11yo and I don't want to keep putting her off because I think she can learn to read now as she knows all her letter sounds. She does not have the fine motor skills to write yet. We are starting her with Level B and her little brother is in K. I have a resource available which is totally sight words, but I wonder if doing too many things is confusing or if it would be helpful to start her with that now.

    Second question is regarding Level 1. I am wondering how much of an overlap there will be with books from the typical program. For read alouds specifically. Right now I am using the library as much as I can for my son's K program. But, if I know we will be using the books for my two girls I will plan to pick more of them up for our library.

    Thanks.
    Christi

    #2
    Hi, Christi.

    Your first question:

    First I am wondering when learning to read starts. I have heard so many different approaches as being successful for students with down syndrome. My daughter is already 11yo and I don't want to keep putting her off because I think she can learn to read now as she knows all her letter sounds. She does not have the fine motor skills to write yet. We are starting her with Level B and her little brother is in K. I have a resource available which is totally sight words, but I wonder if doing too many things is confusing or if it would be helpful to start her with that now.


    You might find this similar Struggling Student forum discussion helpful. For a good compilation of research on teaching reading to children with Down Syndrome, see the link within our conversation.

    If your daughter is ready to learn to read, you will want to include explicit phonics instruction, even as you support her with highly visual materials. You can do this alongside your Simply Classical Level B program, so she continues to work on the fine-motor and oral language skills included in Level B.

    You can "borrow" your other daughter's First Start Reading Book A. After you read through the Teacher's Guide, teach FSR A without the writing components for your older daughter. As you teach, create "whole word" cards for her, so she receives the sight word component. Keep these in a little recipe box or in a notebook, so she can enjoy seeing how many words she is learning.


    Regarding your second question:

    Second question is regarding Level 1. I am wondering how much of an overlap there will be with books from the typical program. For read alouds specifically. Right now I am using the library as much as I can for my son's K program. But, if I know we will be using the books for my two girls I will plan to pick more of them up for our library.


    We just finished the Book List for Simply Classical Level 1! Several of the books from this Level 1 list will overlap with your MPK, so you might select your daughter's favorites for your home library.

    Read-Alouds
    □ The Important Book
    □ Ox-Cart Man
    □ Bread and Jam for Frances
    □ The Story of Ferdinand
    □ This Is the Feast
    □ A Tree Is Nice
    □ The Little Fir Tree
    □ Mr. Willowby’s Christmas Tree
    □ The Twelve Days of Christmas
    □ Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
    □ Gregory’s Shadow
    □ Pancakes, Pancakes!
    □ Paddle-to-the-Sea
    □ Come On, Rain!
    □ The Seven Silly Eaters
    □ A House for Hermit Crab
    □ Owl Moon

    Science, History, Geography, & World Books
    □ Apples
    □ The Vegetables We Eat
    □ Bugs Are Insects
    □ From Seed to Plant
    □ Hide and Seek Fog
    □ Follow the Dream: The Story of Christopher Columbus
    □ How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World
    □ The Big Dipper
    □ A Tree Is a Plant
    □ Where Are the Night Animals?
    □ Snow Is Falling
    □ Wonders of Nature
    □ All Things Bright and Beautiful
    □ Milk: From Cow to Carton
    □ From Tadpole to Frog
    □ From Caterpillar to Butterfly
    □ All About Owls



    Thanks-
    Cheryl


    Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child


    NEW Simply Classical Curriculum
    - more levels to come

    Comment

    Working...
    X