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Classical Composition with a student who has some learning issues...

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  • 3girlsforus
    replied
    Cheryl,

    Thank you so much!! This is terrific. I love the Essay Writing as a simple model link. The comment in there 'ideas were easy to generate but organization proved difficult'.... that is my daughter exactly. All this stuff comes tumbling out of her but it's just all over the place. I love the idea of using this template along side CC. She's bright and capable but sometimes she needs to be shown the basic ideas before she can delve deeper when most students can infer the basic idea on their own. I keep trying to find the balance between providing the basics while not short-changing her capabilities. This sounds good. I'm going to get Fable.

    Heather

    Leave a comment:


  • cherylswope
    replied
    Originally posted by 3girlsforus View Post
    Paul suggested I post this here....

    I have slowly started using MP products for my 6th grade daughter and it's going really well so I am looking at more options for her. She doesn't have an official diagnosis but we suspect she has executive processing issues. Right now we are kind of floundering with writing. I haven't found anything I really like for her. I used the progymnasmata for my oldest daughter, now in college, using a different program and primarily online courses. It's excellent but I am really worried it's too vague and conceptual for my 6th grader. She required step-by-step instructions and is very literal. Transferring ideas and concepts into unfamiliar settings is very difficult for her. So she may be able to work through the CC exercises but then some day be asked to write an essay about something I worry she might not be able to transfer all those concepts into an essay. Has anyone ever used CC with a student who has learning issues? How does it play out when they are presented with modern writing assignments later on? It wasn't an issue for my older girls but this student is different.
    You have at least three options:

    1. Teach simple, step-by-step paragraph and essay writing now. Then move to CC after a semester or two.
    2. Proceed to CC and supplement with step-by-step paragraph and essay practice. Integrate her own history, literature, or science courses as content.
    3. Proceed to CC and hope for the best without any modifications.

    You already indicated some trepidation with #3, so 1 or 2 seems preferable.

    If you want to try #1, you might begin with Intro to Composition. If you prefer to use a homemade approach, you can teach from this template entitled Special Needs and Essay Writing as a simple model. Your own daughter's stronger intellectual capacity will allow for more sophistication than is given in this example, but you might appreciate having this straightforward template.

    Whether with #1 or #2, you might assign topics from her studies, so she writes a single paragraph daily. Expand to a 3-paragraph essay with Intro, Body, and Concluding paragraphs. Eventually teach the standard 5-paragraph essay with Intro, 3 Body paragraphs, and Conclusion. You can teach with CC Fable, as you do this. Each exercise may strengthen the other.


    Regardless of your decision, a careful, step-by-step approach will assist those possible executive function difficulties. My own children, both with significant executive function and processing difficulties, greatly appreciate the "template" approach to essay writing!


    Cheryl

    Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

    Leave a comment:


  • Classical Composition with a student who has some learning issues...

    Paul suggested I post this here....

    I have slowly started using MP products for my 6th grade daughter and it's going really well so I am looking at more options for her. She doesn't have an official diagnosis but we suspect she has executive processing issues. Right now we are kind of floundering with writing. I haven't found anything I really like for her. I used the progymnasmata for my oldest daughter, now in college, using a different program and primarily online courses. It's excellent but I am really worried it's too vague and conceptual for my 6th grader. She required step-by-step instructions and is very literal. Transferring ideas and concepts into unfamiliar settings is very difficult for her. So she may be able to work through the CC exercises but then some day be asked to write an essay about something I worry she might not be able to transfer all those concepts into an essay. Has anyone ever used CC with a student who has learning issues? How does it play out when they are presented with modern writing assignments later on? It wasn't an issue for my older girls but this student is different.
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