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This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

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Student with down syndrome...

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    Student with down syndrome...

    I posted an introduction question on the main K-8 board as well.

    My 11yo daughter has down syndrome she has always been home and we have taken a very relaxed approach. She is extremely delayed in her expressive language, math skills and fine motor. She knows all her letters and sounds and I know she has the potential to learn more if I work with her more. I have yet to find a program that is a good fit for her. We have been limping along using Sonlight with her younger brother(6.5) and sister(4).

    I am wondering if I should read the book Simply Classical first before buying any curriculum. I also wonder about combining anyone as it seems the JrK and level C have quite a few books in common.

    I am also wondering how to score the Assessing Readiness guides you have for the SN levels. I know my daughter will still enjoy picture books and that chapter books are too much for her. I can usually get her to attend to work for 10-15 minutes if she is interested and engaged.

    Thanks for any thoughts or insight you can share. We are ready for a change and I think this might be just the course we need to head.

    #2
    Originally posted by 4Brightdays View Post
    I posted an introduction question on the main K-8 board as well.

    My 11yo daughter has down syndrome she has always been home and we have taken a very relaxed approach. She is extremely delayed in her expressive language, math skills and fine motor. She knows all her letters and sounds and I know she has the potential to learn more if I work with her more. I have yet to find a program that is a good fit for her. We have been limping along using Sonlight with her younger brother(6.5) and sister(4).

    I am wondering if I should read the book Simply Classical first before buying any curriculum. I also wonder about combining anyone as it seems the JrK and level C have quite a few books in common.

    I am also wondering how to score the Assessing Readiness guides you have for the SN levels. I know my daughter will still enjoy picture books and that chapter books are too much for her. I can usually get her to attend to work for 10-15 minutes if she is interested and engaged.

    Thanks for any thoughts or insight you can share. We are ready for a change and I think this might be just the course we need to head.

    Hi, Christi. Welcome!

    Let's take these one at a time:

    Reading Simply Classical -
    You will not need to read Simply Classical before beginning, although I do think you will enjoy reading the book. The first portion is told in story form. Many people read the essential first four chapters swiftly. You could read those chapters first, and then save the remaining parts as a reference guide when needed. Even so, you can begin teaching the Simply Classical Curriculum on its own. The lesson plans were created to give you everything you need for a year.

    Combining Level C and MPJrK -
    Yes, if you determine that your daughter should begin Level C, and if you want to teach MPJrK to another child simultaneously, you might be able to combine the children. We can help you with this. First, you will need to determine whether Level C will be appropriate for your daughter. Then you can determine whether or not to combine the two children for instruction this year.

    Assessment - two steps:
    1. Read Where Do I Begin? at the top of the page listing the Assessments.

    2. Next, based on the descriptions of your daughter's skills, you might consider administering the Skills Assessments for both Level B and Level C. See if either level would be suitable. (If you find that she scores 100% in all areas of Readiness Levels B & C, she might be ready for Simply Classical's Student Level 1 which will be available soon.)

    Evaluation -
    As you begin to teach your daughter more formally, you might consider obtaining an updated formal standardized evaluation in areas such as speech and language, gross-motor, fine-motor, and academic or processing abilities and strengths. This information could help you, even as you teach her with the Simply Classical Curriculum. You will find many tips for navigating this process in Simply Classical's assessment chapters.


    If we can help in any way, let us know. This can be an exciting time for all three of your children!

    Thanks-
    Cheryl

    Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

    Comment


      #3
      Well she seems to be about 50/50 on level B. It is so hard with her lack of expressive language. Her receptive language is fantastic.

      I think A would be way too easy for her. Other than to just be getting her used to doing school work. I think I can do that moving at her pace with B.

      One more question. Do you think it would be okay to have my youngest(almost 4)work along with her in B rather than using JrK for her? I don't know if I can keep up with three different programs right now and I know my 6.5yo would be pretty bored with either of those. Most likely he would start with K.

      Thanks for all your help.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by 4Brightdays View Post
        Well she seems to be about 50/50 on level B. It is so hard with her lack of expressive language. Her receptive language is fantastic.

        I think A would be way too easy for her. Other than to just be getting her used to doing school work. I think I can do that moving at her pace with B.

        One more question. Do you think it would be okay to have my youngest(almost 4)work along with her in B rather than using JrK for her? I don't know if I can keep up with three different programs right now and I know my 6.5yo would be pretty bored with either of those. Most likely he would start with K.

        Thanks for all your help.

        Very good. Yes, begin Level B. This will give her good practice with daily, formal lessons. Yet the work will not overwhelm her.

        For her expressive language, be sure to consider obtaining a good speech and language evaluation along with speech and language services, if needed. Level B will work on expressive language through repetition and other techniques, but she may benefit from individualized therapies at the same time.


        Yes, you can most certainly combine your youngest with your daughter in Level B. They could even share workbooks by alternating exercises or pages, so you would need to purchase only one curriculum for the two of them. They might enjoy the friendly "competition" and the fun of reciting together. My children enjoyed recitations, read-alouds, and flash cards together, even though their skills did not match perfectly.

        Next year you can re-assess. Combining them this year will help all of you, as you create a new rhythm in your homeschooling.

        Congratulations on determining where to begin! If you find portions of Level B too easy, you can always move a little more quickly than the lesson plans indicate.


        And you may always ask more than "one more" question.

        Thanks-
        Cheryl


        Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

        Cheryl Swope, M.Ed., with foreword by Dr. Gene Edward Veith

        Comment


          #5
          This is sort of odd. I did the Level C placement assessment and my daughter scored mostly yes and emerging. She only had two nos.

          So now I am wondering if I would be better to start her in C. This is just starting to feel so confusing to me. Between her and needing to decide between K and first for my 6.5yo.

          If you have any pointers to help me decide I would love to hear. I can give exact score numbers too if that helps.

          Comment


            #6
            Christi,

            This is actually good news! You can combine your youngest (almost 4) child and your daughter with Down Syndrome in Level C! While some items in Level C might be a little above your youngest, your daughter's need for a slower pace might help them match together nicely. You retain control as the teacher to slow or hasten the pace wherever needed, for either or both of them.

            You can teach your 6.5yo son in K at the same time. Neither program takes too much time.

            Bonus - your youngest will be ready to begin K next year or the year afterward. You will already be experienced teaching MPK.


            While this initial process may be confusing, matching the skill level is so important to your success and theirs. All of your good thinking-behind-the-scenes will save you much time when you begin, and this will help everything progress more smoothly from the beginning. The lesson plan formats are similar in Level C and MPK, so securing a rhythm for your children might come rather easily to you.


            If you would like, you can order the Core of Level C, just as we discussed with Level B. Then obtain the Level C Read-Aloud set through the library. You can do the same with MPK.

            Does that sound workable to you?

            Cheryl


            Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

            Comment


              #7
              Christi -

              I'm thinking more about this. Your daughter scored well for beginning Level C.

              Even so, I'm curious about the discrepancy in assessment scores.

              I would like to look more closely at each category separately, if you do not mind.


              If you have time, please send me the results for Levels B & C privately: cherylswope@memoriapress.com


              Thanks-
              Cheryl


              Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks Cheryl. I sent you a message. Also thanks for your encouragement.

                Blessings,
                Christi

                Comment


                  #9
                  For anyone following our journey with this young girl, ...

                  We have reviewed her test scores, and we're swinging back to Level B.

                  As with anything related to special needs, each child is different. This student's "no's" are decidedly low in critical areas. Building these skills will be essential. And Level B will be sufficiently challenging for the youngest child, so Level B will be her starting point.


                  Thanks to all who read or post here -

                  Cheryl

                  Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child
                  Cheryl Swope, M.Ed., with foreword by Dr. Gene Edward Veith

                  New Simply Classical Curriculum - many more levels to come!

                  For older students: My Thankfulness Journal Series

                  For early fine-motor skills: Scissors Books

                  Comment

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