Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

Rod & Staff Math & Help Supporting Kids with Math Probs

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • HeatherB
    replied
    Re: Rod & Staff Math & Help Supporting Kids with Math Probs

    That's why I didn't know about it then. We just now bought level 1 for use after the first of the year with my 5 year old. We've been using level 2 for awhile with my 2 with special struggles and I didn't recall those hand motions in it. Thanks for clarification.

    Originally posted by Michael View Post
    Your attachments showed up fine and your post was clear, so I think you're good!

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael
    replied
    Re: Rod & Staff Math & Help Supporting Kids with Math Probs

    Originally posted by Anita View Post
    (Can a moderator help here? Don't want to confuse.)
    Your attachments showed up fine and your post was clear, so I think you're good!

    Leave a comment:


  • Anita
    replied
    Re: Rod & Staff Math & Help Supporting Kids with Math Probs

    Hi Heather!

    Don't know if you are on the same textbook we are, but the hand signals are on page 10 of the Rod & Staff Teachers Manual for Beginning Arithmetic, 1. Here is a picture:
    Click image for larger version

Name:	image.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	73.3 KB
ID:	103803
    Click image for larger version

Name:	image.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	109.8 KB
ID:	103804

    If you are not using the same book or if you are at a higher level than 1 in Math and they simply don't employ this technique, it's worth a try. Pages 10-14 of the R&S Math Teachers Manual 1 give loads of practical, multi-sensory tools and advice for learning Math concepts. But again, this is for level 1.

    (Can a moderator help here? Don't want to confuse.)

    Leave a comment:


  • howiecram
    replied
    Re: Rod & Staff Math & Help Supporting Kids with Math Probs

    They talk about the hand signals in the front of the teacher's manual........there are a few pages of helpful instructions before the lessons.

    Leave a comment:


  • HeatherB
    replied
    Re: Rod & Staff Math & Help Supporting Kids with Math Probs

    Anita---I don't know what hand signals are in math. Is this something in book 1? I don't remember it in level 2 of Rod & Staff math. Please help me to understand.


    Originally posted by Anita View Post
    A few things:

    1) Practice your R&S hand signals twice daily. Before, after, between. Take your number line and ask, "What comes after 5?" (Hand signal) "Before?" (Hand signal) "Between 5 and 7?" (Hand signal). You likely already do this, but you didnt mention it, so I thought I'd recommend.
    2) I have a SmethPort 100 board (from Amazon) http://smile.amazon.com/Smethport-Ta...thport+hundred It sits on a table top and you can take the cards out and rearrange them how the situation demands. There are dozens of games you can play with it. (Search "Things to do with a Hundred Board" -- WOW.) The numbers are color coded -- all the twos, threes, fives, etc, are different colors in vertical arrangement. So it's easy to see where the fives are, for example.
    3) I STILL sing the Schoolhouse Rock Fives song! https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7VjcUOmPS5k
    And my kids have just discovered (with my help) the Ladybug Picnic song https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ouZvzx3Vgkw. Love at first listen.
    4) Keep at it, Mama! Good work so far, don't short-sell yourself. Just keep truckin' ;-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Anita
    replied
    Re: Rod & Staff Math & Help Supporting Kids with Math Probs

    Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
    Hello, Heather.

    Thanks for the update. I'm relieved to hear both children are doing well with the computation aspects of R&S. Congratulations on this!


    100 NUMBER CHART
    As much as possible, even daily before lessons or before game time, count to 100 with a visual 100 number chart with 5's and 0's aligned (or make your own). Then count by 5's together and show how quickly you reach 100 this way. Then select any given number and use the language, "Which number comes before?" "Which number comes after?" Be sure to check understanding of "before" and "after" outside of math, and teach as needed. You can do this by pretending stuffed animals are in line to purchase a movie ticket, or in conversation about activities throughout the day: We will eat breakfast before we go for our walk. "What did we do after breakfast?" "What did we do before our walk?"

    Use little markers, such as Cheerios, and place one on the 5's as you count, "5, 10, 15, 20, 25." These lend themselves nicely to a chant or rhythm. Be sure to say them as rhythmically as you can each time.
    A few things:

    1) Practice your R&S hand signals twice daily. Before, after, between. Take your number line and ask, "What comes after 5?" (Hand signal) "Before?" (Hand signal) "Between 5 and 7?" (Hand signal). You likely already do this, but you didnt mention it, so I thought I'd recommend.
    2) I have a SmethPort 100 board (from Amazon) http://smile.amazon.com/Smethport-Ta...thport+hundred It sits on a table top and you can take the cards out and rearrange them how the situation demands. There are dozens of games you can play with it. (Search "Things to do with a Hundred Board" -- WOW.) The numbers are color coded -- all the twos, threes, fives, etc, are different colors in vertical arrangement. So it's easy to see where the fives are, for example.
    3) I STILL sing the Schoolhouse Rock Fives song! https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7VjcUOmPS5k
    And my kids have just discovered (with my help) the Ladybug Picnic song https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ouZvzx3Vgkw. Love at first listen.
    4) Keep at it, Mama! Good work so far, don't short-sell yourself. Just keep truckin' ;-)
    Last edited by Anita; 10-31-2015, 12:22 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Colomama
    replied
    Re: Rod & Staff Math & Help Supporting Kids with Math Probs

    I found a Rightstart math games set on clearance. It has loads of games from learning numbers clear through division. It makes learning, or relearning, math concepts more exciting. It's definitely a treat and helps improve social skills at the same time. We have one very sore loser in the house and the games have helped address that.

    We use this game set as our second session math later in the day. I like that it's easy to find and implement a math game directly related to our lesson or struggle. They also have a heavy emphasis on fact mastery and so it works well with rod and staff.

    If the whole set can't be found on clearance, you can buy individual game components, say addition or clock work, on an as-needed basis from rainbowresource.

    Leave a comment:


  • cherylswope
    replied
    Hello, Heather.

    Thanks for the update. I'm relieved to hear both children are doing well with the computation aspects of R&S. Congratulations on this!

    As you know, children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome can struggle profoundly with math concepts. Such children, as well as children with dyscalculia and other known math difficulties, may benefit from a second "math" period each day. Given the behavioral issues, you may not want to call it math, unless this helps provide structure.

    Create multi-sensory, movement-oriented, musical, rhythmic, and engaging but simple sessions. Just as you drench your children in language, you will need to provide "over-learning" opportunities with math. It requires expanding our own verbally-oriented minds to the world of number, order, sets, beauty, and patterns: all from the quadrivium.



    During this special period, you can include brief activities related to learned and upcoming concepts from the formal math program.

    Examples related to the current difficulty:


    COUNTING BY FIVES

    You mention specifically counting by five's (and twenty-five's). This difficulty may be related to an over-reliance on counting by ones. For this, you do not need one-by-one counting books or board games, but rather activities that help her think in sets and patterns. You may want to teach this apart from the pencil-and-paper exercises right now, placing a "sticky" note on those pages to try again after more instruction. Use strengths - whether physical, visual-spatial, verbal, or even competitive - to determine which activities to include in your Math Game time, or use weaker areas to achieve efficient "double duty" with the exercises. You will want as many as you have energy to create and implement. Multiple "modalities" seem to improve both learning and retention.


    100 NUMBER CHART
    As much as possible, even daily before lessons or before game time, count to 100 with a visual 100 number chart with 5's and 0's aligned (or make your own). Then count by 5's together and show how quickly you reach 100 this way. Then select any given number and use the language, "Which number comes before?" "Which number comes after?" Be sure to check understanding of "before" and "after" outside of math, and teach as needed. You can do this by pretending stuffed animals are in line to purchase a movie ticket, or in conversation about activities throughout the day: We will eat breakfast before we go for our walk. "What did we do after breakfast?" "What did we do before our walk?"

    Use little markers, such as Cheerios, and place one on the 5's as you count, "5, 10, 15, 20, 25." These lend themselves nicely to a chant or rhythm. Be sure to say them as rhythmically as you can each time.

    Additional Suggestions to Spark Your Own Ideas:

    DICE GAMES
    To help your children think in "sets," obtain as many dice as you can find (all 5 from Yahtzee would work well). Turn each to "5." Place one die on the table. "How many is this?" If they begin to count dots, say, "This is 5." Place another on the table. "Now how many all together?" If they count dots, say, "5 + 5 = 10." Then add another for 15. Do this often, until seeing "5" becomes automatic.

    CARD GAMES
    Pull 5 from all 4 suits. Create "5 Slam." You place one card on table. The first to say "5" wins a token. You place 2 5's on the table. The first to say "10" wins a token. Continue to 20. Then scramble. (Place 3 cards, for 15; then 1 card for 5.) Make each token worth 5. Count the tokens at the end (by 5's, of course!).

    NICKELS
    Obtain a roll of nickels. (Teach 5 pennies = 1 nickel.) Use these to teach counting by sets of 5. Then place a random number of nickels on the table, and have quick competitions to identify the amount of change. If your budget permits, divide the nickels among anyone with 5 correct answers.

    MARCHING 5's
    Have each child create a large 5 on a piece of paper. Give the child his 5 sign. Have the child march chanting, "5, 10, 15, 20, 25...." (In some ways, the children's immaturity can work with you. At least in our family's case, my children enjoyed such activities far beyond the time their peers would have done so!)

    VERTICAL WRITING

    Have the child write on a large chalkboard or dry erase board vertically:
    5, 10, 15, 20, 25 lining up 0's and 5's to see patterns, as she counts.
    Create boxes for them beforehand, if needed.
    If this is too difficult at first, have the children "dictate" the numbers, as you write them. When you come to a known number, say "25," have the child write a number. Then you resume. Gradually pass the writing all to the children.

    JUMPING BOXES

    Make (or help a child create) a sidewalk-chalk jumping chart from a printed card. Each box is labeled 5, 10, 15, 20, and so on. The children then jump from box to box, saying, "5, 10, 15, 20." Eventually, you can teach counting backwards by 5's this way, as they jump back from 100 to 5.

    JUMPING NUMBER LINE
    Make (or help a child create) a sidewalk-chalk number line 1-100. Mark each 5 in a different color. Have them jump to each 5. Have them count by 5's as they jump.

    JUMPING JACKS OR JUMPING ROPE
    Count by 5's to the rhythm created by their bodies.

    SONGS
    Create your own or Google "Counting by 5's Schoolhouse Rock" for a lively version.

    ...


    MODIFY FOR 2's, 10's, 25's
    You can modify for Counting by 2's, Counting by 10's, etc. Eventually, this "skip counting" will greatly assist your teaching of multiplication.

    TEACHING BY SETS AND PATTERNS
    For general strengthening of number concepts, include any game with dice and these games with matching sets: Dominoes, Uno, Crazy Eights, and Set.

    ...

    DAILY
    If all of this seems like too much right now, at the very least you will want to count by 5's chanting in a rhythm. Perhaps include one nightly game, and add large-motor activities whenever time permits.

    EXPAND to 10's, 25's
    Add real dimes to count by 10's and quarters to count by 25's. This will help money concepts at the same time.


    ...

    SIDE NOTE -
    Another homeschooling friend played board games and card games with her children nightly before reading stories. She did this throughout their homeschooling years from about age 4-14. None had special needs, but she knew the value of developing number concepts and mental math calculations through games. Nightly games followed by read-alouds worked well as an after-dinner routine for them.


    Even today my 19yo twins and I often play a 15-30 minute board game or card game in the evenings. Such games help working memory and "number sense" in enjoyable ways. The games also give ample practice for good manners, problem solving, turn-taking, family roles, and sportsmanship. This requires little planning on my part, as my children (autism spectrum) predictably request the same games every night!


    Hth-
    Cheryl


    Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

    Leave a comment:


  • Rod & Staff Math & Help Supporting Kids with Math Probs

    My oldest 2 who have FAS are going to always struggle with Math because that is common with this brain injury/disorder. I'm looking for advice on the part they are struggling with right now. Rod & Staff asking them to count by 5s and put number that comes before 100 (example) and number after it. My daughter whose IQ is lower than her brother's (both have FAS) is especially struggling with this and puts crazy random numbers. I am struggling trying to figure out how ot help her with this. I see that the next lesson has counting by 25's and I admit I get stressed just seeing that on the page. I had my daughter skip some of this last week b/c it was so stressful/confusing for her. They both are doing fine with the computation in book 1 of the 2nd grade curric. from Rod & Staff.

    any tips? Should I just skip over it or is there a helpful way to support them with these kinds of problems.

    Thanks!

    heather brandt
Working...
X