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Independent Work for Child Emotionally 3 but doing 1st Grade Work Level?

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    Independent Work for Child Emotionally 3 but doing 1st Grade Work Level?

    today, my mind is on how to keep my 11 year old with FAS who is emotionally 3 occupied when I am switching out my kids for phonics/reading lessons which I have to do one on one at this time. today went south b/c she finished practicing her reading and starting talking ugly/and disturbing siblings working on other projects. She is a beginner knitter but currently stuck and not interested in doing it until her teacher works more with her. because her brother has auditory processing problems as she does (these are my 2 oldest who have FAS whom we adopted from latvia last year), he needs quiet during his phonics/one on one time so she has been working on practicing reading on her own in her room while I teach him.

    Can't wait for our conference this month & hoping it helps us with our endeavours to give all of our children, irregardless of 2 of them having FAS diagnoses, a classical education focuses on beauty and truth.

    Thank you,

    Heather

    #2
    fidgets

    When my son was younger and in a special ed class for autistic children, they kept those clear plastic shoeboxes filled with small fidget toys in the area where they had one on one instruction. Some were happy meal toys, others were actual therapeutic fidgets. Generally there would be four children working in the room with two teachers. The teacher would give them each something to do, one working independently and one working with her, then she would switch. After the first one finished one on one with her, he was allowed to pick one fidget toy and play with it for a while. Some of these children were very low-functioning and non-verbal, others higher-functioning. But they all knew and accepted the rule about surrendering the fidget toys when time was up. Years later, when we go back to visit, my son goes straight into that room and pulls out the fidget toys.
    We have this one fidget toy called Tangle (available at Amazon) that everyone loves to play with.
    Blessings,
    Jude

    dd 17
    ds 14 (special needs)
    ds 11
    ds 9
    dd 7
    ds 5
    dd 2

    Comment


      #3
      I think the tangle would bore her. It would work as her taggy blanket does when she is sitting with all of us listening to a read aloud and gets fidgety but it would not be interesting enough to occupy her when she is having time alone. I need something more engaging for her to do. She likes doing school work but I wish I could give her something at her level/abilities tied to what we are studying in our classical style homeschooling...hmmm

      Comment


        #4
        independent

        My son can now do copy work that comes from our memory work on his own when I am working with others. It is also a good time for him to look up vocabulary words in the dictionary and copy them down in his vocabulary notebook. He loves to draw, so he can sit quietly and draw a picture of something we have read about or try to draw that week's art study selection.
        Blessings
        Jude

        dd 17
        ds 14 (special needs)
        ds 11
        ds 9
        dd 7
        ds 5
        dd 2

        Comment


          #5
          Is there a certain dictionary that you recommend for children who are visual and developmentally still at primary school age?

          Comment


            #6
            dictionary

            For primary level we use the Webster's New World Children's Dictionary. He currently uses the same Webster's Compact Desk Dictionary and Style Guide that my other children use. If a word can't be found in there, we pull out our huge Oxford Unabridged Dictionary that is about 8 inches thick with tiny print.
            It is very helpful for him that all of his vocabulary is done in one notebook. (I do this with my other children as well.) When he sees that notebook and the dictionary out, he knows exactly what he needs to be doing. The same is true with his copy work notebook. I have to keep things very concrete for him to be successful.
            Blessings,
            Jude

            dd 17
            ds 14 (special needs)
            ds 11
            ds 9
            dd 7
            ds 5
            dd 2

            Comment


              #7
              You might try busy bags/trays. Everything for a simple kid-directed activity goes into one baggie or on one tray, and you have a basket full of them. They pull one out and work on the activity, so long as she can learn to put each one back in the bag without too much fuss.

              They can be filled with fine motor activities or things that are components of activities of daily living. all kinds of things. Check out Pinterest (if you dare delve into that potential time waster :P) or Google it and there are tons of blogs that give ideas for them. Blogs that give ideas for Preschool Montessori Life Skills (Think I am using the term they use for ADL's) have great ideas for these kinds of things kids can keep themselves busy with that also teach them.

              One of my now six year old's favorites this last school year was a small bowl sitting in an aluminum pie pan. It was half full of popcorn kernels. There was a tiny funnel and a tall plastic spice bottle with no lid. There was also a spoon on the pan. He would sit for up to an hour spooning the popcorn from the bowl to the funnel in the jar and then pouring them back into the bowl. And it was a good motor control and integration activity.

              We also had a pan that had a red silicone cup and a green silicone cup (like for salsa size), a set of small tongs, and a pile of red and green pom poms to match to the colors of the cups.

              Another one he liked was threading beads on pipe cleaners. I had cut ten pipe cleaners to the right lengths to line up like a pyramid, and he had beads in ten colors (the pipe cleaners were all white). So he had to line the pipe cleaner pieces up to see which ones needed which number of beads, count out each color of beads, and then thread them on the right pipe cleaner. It seems like a pretty simple little activity, but really has a lot of thought that has to go into getting it right. Since the pipe cleaners were cut, it was self-correcting if he lined them up wrong, something wouldn't fit.

              He enjoyed pushing wooden golf tees into Styrofoam and then balancing marbles on the tops. Sometimes he even made patterns with it. If you were ambitious you could make patterns, take pictures, print them out, and ask her to match them. (That process works with colored centimeter blocks or even building blocks, too). If she's covering patterns in school, she might enjoy being able to name the types of patterns she is seeing in the pictures, or just recreating ones she has learned in school.

              My guy wasn't old enough for this one last year, but on first grade level work, it could work. Letter beads, pipe cleaners (or yarn, if her coordination is good enough) and her current spelling word list, or just free play spelling words. Maybe she would get into it and make little sentences on them.

              We also experimented with putting some simple snack foods on a table where he could reach, and he got immense pleasure out of being able to make his own pb&j. It took him thirty minutes, but he was very proud of it. I don't know where yours are with that sort of thing, but maybe some kind of picture recipe that she can do herself to make the dessert for lunch (sort of where you can see her out of the corner of your eye, I'm not saying put one with a three year old emotional level unsupervised around knives).

              Less obviously educational could include 1 can of play doh maybe with a couple of the play doh toys (hand strength), special coloring type activities (mine despised coloring, and hates doing handwork with writing devices, but those little books that have the clear markers and you color over the page and it makes color appear--those he would color in), little wooden peg games (even if they just fill it up with pegs and then take them back out), pages with things to cut out, paper and tape to rip up and tape back together, sensory jars (tons of ideas on Pinterest), I-spy jars/tubes or the books, mazes, moon sand (very cheap to make--three bottles of baby oil, 20 pounds of plain flour, and medium size tub with a lid--it lasts an incredibly long time and feels really cool), water beads, other sensory tubs, bags of material scraps with interesting textures, sewing projects that use those large hole plastic meshes, resistance tubing/bands

              Something that might help her keep her busy with the knitting is a knitting loom. I can't manage real knitting, myself, but with a loom I can make a hat in about an hour. Scarves in not much longer. Knifty Knitter is the biggest name brand, but I think all stores that sell yarn have their own store brands. All you do is wrap counter clockwise around each peg all the way around the loom (twice the first time) then pull the bottom row over the top of the peg all the way around and then wrap each peg again and so on until you have the length of tube you want.

              You can make a knitting loom that creates long 'yarn snakes' (that can then be fashioned into various projects) with a toilet paper tube, Popsicle sticks, and duct tape. Tape four sticks evenly around the tube, wrapping the tape several rounds for sturdiness and then just like any loom, wrap and pull over the top.

              She might think these sorts of things are too babyish, but the same kinds of ideas could be scaled up to where she is interested.
              Miah - married to Warcabbage, 3 boys, BS in social work, AS in Electrical Engineering Technology

              Evulcarrot - 18, freshman in college, Medical Technology , mild autism
              Battlebroccoli - 17, lives with grandma, attends a special high school program part time
              Doomsprout - 10, highly verbal moderate autism, anxiety, motor delays, sensory processing issues - SC 4 with R&S 4

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by HeatherB View Post
                I need something more engaging for her to do. She likes doing school work but I wish I could give her something at her level/abilities tied to what we are studying in our classical style homeschooling...hmmm

                Hi, Heather. I'm looking forward to meeting you at the MP conference!

                I very much appreciate your desire to engage your daughter in classical or beautiful ways, even as you teach your other children.

                Jude and Miah offered good suggestions for fine-motor activities, copywork to boost memory work, and more. Other possibilities include these:
                • a basket with books of beautiful art
                • headphones with classical music, perhaps all Mozart, especially if she can learn to relax in this way
                • CD's with stories of great composers
                • audio books with headphones
                • flash cards or animal classification cards for independent review (then perhaps you test her knowledge of these once a week)
                • CD's with math facts or arithmetic flash cards
                • AudioMemory CD's such as Geography Songs with a map to color


                Many of these items can be found at the library. You could alternate her favorites: Week 1 audio books, Week 2 art books, Week 3 math CD, etc.

                If you think any of these might work, she could even have her own portable CD player. (My son finds these as cast-offs at very reasonable prices at garage sales, because many children appreciate more stylish listening devices!)


                Your daughter's own interests could guide these "free-time" activities, or you could attempt to broaden her interests. When my children were younger, we often searched the large Listening Bin at the library to find new options. During one visit, my daughter stumbled upon a CD that unexpectedly became her favorite: beautifully plaintive children's lullabies sung in Hebrew!


                Others may have more suggestions. If not, we can delve more deeply when you're in Louisville.

                Cheryl


                Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

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