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Checking in and scheduling question

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    Checking in and scheduling question

    Hi Cheryl, We are having a busy summer with lots of travel, but looking forward to the new year. We are going to try the slower paced third grade. Question, how do I go about making a schedule for my family of homeschoolers? Any suggestions. I hope things are well for your family. Susan

    #2
    Hi, Susan.

    Yes, our summer has been very good. Michael & Michelle, both 19, are relatively stable right now, so I am very thankful. They both serve in the community 3 days a week in various well-supervised settings. Michelle helps in a nursing home and in a center for developmentally delayed adults. Her happy chattering cheers both the elderly ladies at the home and the nonverbal people at the center. Meanwhile, Michael proudly wears a staff pin at the history museum in our small town.

    All three of us just visited my favorite doctor yesterday. This doctor, John Hopkins-trained in both autism and schizophrenia, suits us perfectly and has seen us every 8 weeks from the time my kids were 13, so she is almost extended family. (She even attended the twins' graduation party, where Michael honored her in a speech from our staircase). As the kids sat in the waiting room yesterday, this doctor/friend and I both reflected, welling with tears in her office, grateful and amazed at how far they have come.


    To your question ...

    Scheduling options abound! You really can structure your days and weeks ANY way that works best for all 4 of your daughters (and you).



    Some tips that helped us:

    Opening

    -Begin at a set time each day. Consider assessing a "fine" of either $1.00 or 30min earlier bedtime that night for anyone not ready with all morning jobs completed. Post the list of morning jobs, so you do not need to nag/remind every morning. (Get dressed, make bed, eat breakfast, brush teeth, feed cat.)
    -Open with an overview of the day and a comforting devotion, such as a Bible story, catechism reading, Scripture memory, or hymn.
    -Do recitations.

    Instruction/Independent Work
    -Teach reading for any non-readers; teach Latin & math for readers (hardest subjects first, to be sure they are accomplished)
    -Assign independent work for anyone not involved in teacher-led instruction (puzzles or chores for younger children or non-writers, academic work for writers)

    Chore Break
    -Assign everyone household tasks as "first recess." (We still list ours by day of the week. I post them on a large white board, so I do not need to think of them every day! Monday - strip beds, clear bedroom floors; Tuesday - etc.). While they complete chores, I often start laundry, begin a slowcooker meal, or clean up from breakfast.

    Instruction/Independent Work
    -Finish most difficult subjects, such as grammar or writing

    Outside Break
    -Play soccer together, jump rope with rhyming games, dribble & pass a basketball, work on PT goals, or just go for a walk

    Combined Instruction (sometimes over lunch, if the morning moved slowly)
    -Read-alouds


    Lunch

    Rest time - only reading allowed during this break of quiet time - no talking

    Afternoon
    Mondays & Wednesdays - more academics, piano & music theory lessons
    Tuesdays & Thursdays - homeschool swim with friends, then library, errands, doctor appointments
    Fridays - clean the house (so Dad can enjoy a clean house over the weekend!)


    As listed in Simply Classical, we had many schedules over the years, but this basic structure served us well.

    Another example:

    A local friend not only homeschools her 5 children, but she also teaches higher math full-time at a private Catholic school. After teaching calculus by day, she homeschools her children (ages 8-17) from 3:30pm-8pm each night! She grades all homework ~3:30pm-4:15pm, then begins teaching. She homeschools 8am-5pm every summer. Her "system" sits atop her dining room table: Each child has a huge stack (or stacks) of books with an individual planner. With each child, she makes her way through all of the books and assigns homework, one child at a time. Instruction occurs on the sofa or at the dining room table. Each child has one entire, scheduled "day off" every week. (One of her children will say, "I have Thursdays off this year, so if Michelle wants to have me over to play....") She has taught everything (piano, Latin, math, literature, grammar, science) this way with remarkable discipline and success.

    Every family is different.


    You might first assess these things:


    -Which subjects can each child complete independently or with minimal checking this year?
    -Which subjects require my direct, one-on-one teaching?
    -Which outside commitments (sports, social, church, extended family) do we want to make and keep this year?
    -Which other commitments must we honor?
    -Where can my older children (age 14+) begin serving in the community 1-2 hours/week?
    -How can we use our leisure time to model and instill a love of music, art, reading, nature?


    A practical suggestion:

    This sounds simple, but is surprisingly helpful and was mentioned on the K-8 Board when someone asked a similar question.

    -Use Post-it notes. Teach your children to use Post-it notes. This saves so much time, especially for our special-needs children! When you finish Latina Christiana, for example, place a post-it where you stopped. Have your child do the same in her workbook. (This prevents the slow paging through the book to determine "where we stopped yesterday.") Keep a separate Post-it for the page of recitations or, as in LC I, the page for prayers. You could even color-code them by child, if you wanted. This would help avoid time spent looking for the child's name on the inside cover every day, if more than one student studies the same level.


    I hope something here helps!

    Thanks-
    Cheryl


    Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

    Comment


      #3
      Wonderful ideas, Cheryl! Thanks for all this!

      We have a decent system in place but I am always open to new ideas. I especially LOVE the "fine" in the morning for not being ready to learn. That seems to be our struggle most days. 1 kiddo will be ready and waiting, while the others are dragging with their morning chores and breakfast.

      Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
      Hi, Susan.

      Yes, our summer has been very good. Michael & Michelle, both 19, are relatively stable right now, so I am very thankful. They both serve in the community 3 days a week in various well-supervised settings. Michelle helps in a nursing home and in a center for developmentally delayed adults. Her happy chattering cheers both the elderly ladies at the home and the nonverbal people at the center. Meanwhile, Michael proudly wears a staff pin at the history museum in our small town.

      All three of us just visited my favorite doctor yesterday. This doctor, John Hopkins-trained in both autism and schizophrenia, suits us perfectly and has seen us every 8 weeks from the time my kids were 13, so she is almost extended family. (She even attended the twins' graduation party, where Michael honored her in a speech from our staircase). As the kids sat in the waiting room yesterday, this doctor/friend and I both reflected, welling with tears in her office, grateful and amazed at how far they have come.


      To your question ...

      Scheduling options abound! You really can structure your days and weeks ANY way that works best for all 4 of your daughters (and you).



      Some tips that helped us:

      Opening

      -Begin at a set time each day. Consider assessing a "fine" of either $1.00 or 30min earlier bedtime that night for anyone not ready with all morning jobs completed. Post the list of morning jobs, so you do not need to nag/remind every morning. (Get dressed, make bed, eat breakfast, brush teeth, feed cat.)
      -Open with an overview of the day and a comforting devotion, such as a Bible story, catechism reading, Scripture memory, or hymn.
      -Do recitations.

      Instruction/Independent Work
      -Teach reading for any non-readers; teach Latin & math for readers (hardest subjects first, to be sure they are accomplished)
      -Assign independent work for anyone not involved in teacher-led instruction (puzzles or chores for younger children or non-writers, academic work for writers)

      Chore Break
      -Assign everyone household tasks as "first recess." (We still list ours by day of the week. I post them on a large white board, so I do not need to think of them every day! Monday - strip beds, clear bedroom floors; Tuesday - etc.). While they complete chores, I often start laundry, begin a slowcooker meal, or clean up from breakfast.

      Instruction/Independent Work
      -Finish most difficult subjects, such as grammar or writing

      Outside Break
      -Play soccer together, jump rope with rhyming games, dribble & pass a basketball, work on PT goals, or just go for a walk

      Combined Instruction (sometimes over lunch, if the morning moved slowly)
      -Read-alouds


      Lunch

      Rest time - only reading allowed during this break of quiet time - no talking

      Afternoon
      Mondays & Wednesdays - more academics, piano & music theory lessons
      Tuesdays & Thursdays - homeschool swim with friends, then library, errands, doctor appointments
      Fridays - clean the house (so Dad can enjoy a clean house over the weekend!)


      As listed in Simply Classical, we had many schedules over the years, but this basic structure served us well.

      Another example:

      A local friend not only homeschools her 5 children, but she also teaches higher math full-time at a private Catholic school. After teaching calculus by day, she homeschools her children (ages 8-17) from 3:30pm-8pm each night! She grades all homework ~3:30pm-4:15pm, then begins teaching. She homeschools 8am-5pm every summer. Her "system" sits atop her dining room table: Each child has a huge stack (or stacks) of books with an individual planner. With each child, she makes her way through all of the books and assigns homework, one child at a time. Instruction occurs on the sofa or at the dining room table. Each child has one entire, scheduled "day off" every week. (One of her children will say, "I have Thursdays off this year, so if Michelle wants to have me over to play....") She has taught everything (piano, Latin, math, literature, grammar, science) this way with remarkable discipline and success.

      Every family is different.


      You might first assess these things:


      -Which subjects can each child complete independently or with minimal checking this year?
      -Which subjects require my direct, one-on-one teaching?
      -Which outside commitments (sports, social, church, extended family) do we want to make and keep this year?
      -Which other commitments must we honor?
      -Where can my older children (age 14+) begin serving in the community 1-2 hours/week?
      -How can we use our leisure time to model and instill a love of music, art, reading, nature?


      A practical suggestion:

      This sounds simple, but is surprisingly helpful and was mentioned on the K-8 Board when someone asked a similar question.

      -Use Post-it notes. Teach your children to use Post-it notes. This saves so much time, especially for our special-needs children! When you finish Latina Christiana, for example, place a post-it where you stopped. Have your child do the same in her workbook. (This prevents the slow paging through the book to determine "where we stopped yesterday.") Keep a separate Post-it for the page of recitations or, as in LC I, the page for prayers. You could even color-code them by child, if you wanted. This would help avoid time spent looking for the child's name on the inside cover every day, if more than one student studies the same level.


      I hope something here helps!

      Thanks-
      Cheryl


      Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child
      Katie

      2019/20 6th year with MP
      DS 15: 10th, MPOA: HS Comp II, Economics
      DD 13: 7th, MPOA: Latin, Chreia/Maxim & Ref/Con
      DD 9: 4th using 3A
      Twin DD's 7: 1st

      Comment


        #4
        Checking in and scheduling question

        Cheryl, Thanks for the help. It looks like these ideas will help me. I am glad your young adults are doing well. Blessings, Susan

        Comment

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