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need for systematic rule based phonics

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    need for systematic rule based phonics

    (quick background - dd is 5 (6 in Aug), dyslexic, has trouble with fine motor, multi-step directions, word recall, possibly aspergers, auditory processing issues)

    So far we're doing pretty well using FSR now. We're almost done with book B. I've had to supplement lately with extra word writing practice (not for writing practice so much. more for the reading side of it). At first I would write a column of words which she would say and copy in the next column. Yesterday we moved to dictation. This is because she's not ready for the dictation practice and reviews when they come up in the workbook. We practice on our own and then pick back up in the book. On top of this I made flash cards for all the words by lesson and practice those for a couple minutes each lesson.

    As the lessons continue they are getting quicker (not sure if that's the right description) and I've been reading other's comments about how even after D, there's quite a bit of phonics instruction that won't have been addressed. I'm specifically thinking about those big vowel combinations. One problem I've noticed so far is that there is little to no specific rule information for the teacher to give out. For example why is it 'go' long o, instead of a short o like 'got'. I remember from a preview clip from Susan Barton's program that it's because it's an open syllable. So I tell my daughter to notice that it doesn't have a consonant after it so it says it's name. aka it's long.

    I only know a few of these sorts of rules though.

    I really like the format of the write in book to practice the words. Writing them really helps her to sound them out and clarify which letters/sounds are there.

    I hate to be pessimistic but I'm concerned that when she hits a major block with FSR (especially after we get through D) I won't know where to go with it. Like I said, I don't really know all the rules to be able to clarify or give her the concrete info.

    I'm thinking I'll get the workbooks offered by EPS (the people who make the little red and blue readers included in the K core program). but I'm wonder if that'll get complicated to try to coordinate.

    Any thoughts on perhaps a better, already planned out method or program? I've tried All About Reading but it moved too quickly in the beginning. After we got a hold on sounds and locations I offered to retry it but she liked the idea of writing better than the tiles so we went to FSR.

    #2
    Hi, Katie.

    You have many options, but it seems the easiest and most consistent would be continuing with FSR, supplementing with your own exercises, slowing the pace when needed, and adding resources in a format familiar to her.


    1. Continue with your own copying & dictation exercises on paper or on the board. These sound perfect, especially because writing seems to help.

    2. Utilize your Classical Phonics both as a reference for yourself and a source of copying or dictation exercises for your daughter.

    You mentioned a desire for phonics rules. Mrs. Lowe lists key patterns and phonics rules at the bottom of the pages. If you reviewed these, you could then create clever ways to teach them. For example, Mrs. Lowe suggests saying "vowel teams" when teaching diphthongs. See more phonics rules below.

    3. Consider adding more of the K-Level ALS books
    , because she already knows the series. These will address the phonics skills you want to teach while reviewing the skills she has learned.

    After K One Fun in the Sun, K Two Scamp & Tramp, and K Three Soft & White, you could add any or all of these:
    K Four At the Farm (controlled vowels)
    K Five On the Trail (vowel digraphs)
    K Six Sounds of the Sea (diphthongs)

    The books would give her more reading practice in colorful story form and in a format she knows. They might also give you more material for your own good supplementary exercises.


    [And if these ALS K Four-Six books work for you, this will strengthen our desire to include these in the next special-needs levels!]


    You can find a list of phonics rules below. Such lists vary. You could find even more, but most people suggest focusing on the main rules when teaching reading.

    For a happy little song about #7 below, search youtube for "When Two Vowels Go Walking" from Between the Lions, PBS. I started to post this song here but could not determine their copyright rules!


    Thanks -
    Cheryl


    Phonics Rules

    Vowels -- a,e,i,o, and u; sometimes "y" & "w". Vowel teams (diphthongs): "oi,oy,ou,ow,au,aw, oo" and others.

    Consonants -- all the other letters which stop or limit the flow of air from the throat in speech -- b,c,d,f,g,h,j,k,l,m,n,p,q,r,s,t,v,w,x,y,z. Consonant teams/blends: ch,sh,th,ph,wh, ng, and gh.

    The rules below have exceptions. The rules do work however, for the majority of words.

    1. Every syllable in every word must have a vowel.

    2. "C" followed by "e, i or y" usually has the soft sound of "s". Examples: "cyst", "central", and "city".

    3. "G" followed by "e, i or y" usually has the soft sound of "j". Example: "gem", "gym", and "gist".

    4. When 2 consonants are joined together and form one new sound, they are a consonant digraph. They count as one sound and one letter and are never separated. Examples: "ch,sh,th,ph and wh".

    5. When a syllable ends in a consonant and has only one vowel, that vowel is short. Examples: "fat, bed, fish, spot, luck".

    6. When a syllable ends in a silent "e", the silent "e" is a signal that the vowel in front of it is long. Examples: "make, gene, kite, rope, and use".

    7. When a syllable has 2 vowels together, the first vowel is usually long and the second is silent. Or "when two vowels go walking, the first one does the talking. It says its name!" Examples: "pain, eat, boat, res/cue, say, grow".

    8. Vowel teams - diphthongs - join together to create a new sound. The diphthongs are: "oi,oy,ou,ow,au,aw, oo" and many others.

    9. When a syllable (or word) ends in any vowel and is the only vowel, that vowel is usually long. Examples: "pa/per, me, I, o/pen, u/nit, and my".

    10. When a vowel is followed by an "r" in the same syllable, that vowel is "r-controlled". It is not long nor short. "R-controlled "er,ir,and ur" often sound the same (like "er"). Examples: "term, sir, fir, fur, far, for, su/gar, or/der".




    Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child
    Cheryl Swope, M.Ed., with Foreword by Dr. Gene Edward Veith

    NEW Simply Classical Curriculum for Special Needs

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      #3
      We were struggling with the order in a lot of those programs too. Dd has a tendency to get completely stuck on something, so any program that is cumulative would throw her off because she would have some concept that she was stuck on. Even now that she has had a break-through on reading, I think it is a lot based on sight words rather than really applying phonics very well. Anyway, I got a copy of the Eagle's Wings Comprehensive PHonics Guide. It isn't super user friendly like AAR, but it is systematic. They have lists upon lists of words by spelling patterns. They have little stories and poems to help remember rare spelling combination or phonics rules. But, they also work you through a sound at a time with extensive lists of possible words for reading and spelling and better for us - they are not really cumulative! I was able to skip silent e and spend a ton of time on blends even though that was a later chapter, because the word lists are pretty extensive. Like I said, it isn't a super easy program to use, but it you already have a format that works from FSR I have found it to be a resource that I can finally use because of the flexibility as I try to shore up her phonics with spelling. It is more of a teacher resource than a program for kids, but I have been able to use my knowledge of other phonics programs and put it to good use as a spelling/dictation program for dd who just didn't fit into most phonics programs well. (She disliked SRA and I did too, AAR she is still stuck on syllables, she has most of the words in OPGTR as sight words and won't decode, finished FSR D and needs work on other vowel combos most, plus multisyllable words....basically I couldn't find much of anything that met her needs.)

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        #4
        Cheryl,
        Thanks so much for that list of rules.
        I've looked at the ALS stuff but I'm having a hard time finding good samples. From what I can see in their workbooks, they use a lot of marks on the words (short vowel curve above the letter, etc) which seems like it might be confusing but from what I can see of the description for the exercise, they give good information. I'll have to keep looking into this one. Do you know of an actual publisher site for the series? I am only able to find retailers.



        Armymom,
        Thanks for the great resource. I'm taking a look at that too. What's kinda funny to me, at the moment, is that I have found a great preview on their website but it's so tiny that it's super hard to read! haha i'm not sure why I'm finding it funny at the moment but I am.

        Comment


          #5
          Current options include these:

          1. Mile-Hi Publishers. Example At the Farm.

          2. Amazon At the Farm and others.

          Neither offers a "look inside" sample. However, if you wanted only the readers, you might avoid the issue of confusion with the workbooks.


          If you do not need these immediately, perhaps Memoria Press might carry these books. This might be preferable, because you would be assured good customer service!

          (If you're interested, this sounds like a question for Tanya.)

          Thanks-
          Cheryl

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
            ...Memoria Press might carry these books.
            Tanya comes to the rescue. "Yes," she says, "Memoria Press will carry the next three ALS readers!"

            Currently included in your MP packages:
            K One Fun in the Sun
            K Two Scamp & Tramp
            K Three Soft & White

            You can now order any or all of these directly from Memoria Press:
            K Four At the Farm (controlled vowels)
            K Five On the Trail (vowel digraphs)
            K Six Sounds of the Sea (diphthongs)


            Thanks-
            Cheryl

            Comment


              #7
              ...
              You can now order any or all of these directly from Memoria Press:
              K Four At the Farm (controlled vowels)
              K Five On the Trail (vowel digraphs)
              K Six Sounds of the Sea (diphthongs)
              ...


              A quick update for anyone who would like any of the above readers --

              Pricing and ordering information from Memoria Press now available here.


              Thanks-
              Cheryl


              Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child
              Cheryl Swope, M.Ed., with Foreword by Dr. Gene Edward Veith

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