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This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

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  • cherylswope
    replied
    for Miah

    Originally posted by Miah View Post
    ...one of the state's top autism advocates. She knows the system inside and out, it seems, and gave me her phone number so she can help us get a second opinion. She rattled off a huge list of names of people and procedures to follow. Then she invited me to come speak to a state congressional committee on autism that she is a part of somehow. My head was kind of spinning by that point. (I have serious doubts that I would speak at all. I'd misremember something and cause trouble somehow, I'm sure, but I might go listen sometime)

    Wonderful news about the extra resources & possible second opinion for your youngest! Navigating "the system" is half the battle (at least). Let us know how everything goes.

    If your older boys settle into a routine and become more compliant, perhaps you could supplement in the summers with Classical Studies from Memoria Press, so they can continue with their classical education in small ways.


    As for speaking, go for it, Miah! She probably wants you to speak not as an expert but just as a "real mom." You qualify!

    Our kiddos need advocacy. This leader must have spotted you as someone who could help. Trust her instincts.

    You write well. You'll speak well too. Just bring along some note cards to keep yourself on track. You could even watch a session first (online?), to get a feel for the setting.

    Your own struggles with your boys could help people. If this committee is gathered around autism, you'll already have an interested audience. Few people have three boys with various special needs, so your story will receive attention from the state committee and from any parents who are present. With as many as 1 in 88 children diagnosed on the autism spectrum, this issue affects many parents -- and children. I hope you do this, if she gives you the opportunity.

    Cheryl



    Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child
    Cheryl Swope, M.Ed., with Foreword by Dr. Gene Edward Veith
    www.memoriapress.com, www.cherylswope.com

    Leave a comment:


  • Miah
    replied
    The IEP meeting went well. This new Common Core thing the schools have going seems to put a lot more content into their classes. Still nothing compared to MP, but better than a few years ago. He has a temporary IEP for the next 60 days, while they do a full academic testing work-up and their own speech eval. They have a self contained room suite with four classes in it. One of the classes is made up of about 5 boys his age, who are all diagnosed high functioning, highly verbal autistic. They take the same course schedule as the rest of the school, but have two teachers standing over them all day, and don't have to try to change classes in four minutes with 400+ other kids all in the hall at the same time. The nine weeks grading period has two weeks left in it, so they wanted to give him at least the two weeks in that room to get the testing done and get him used to being at the school, before trying the mainstream classes. I think he'll probably end up in a mix of the self-contained room and the general classes for the final placement.

    Also, today I was talking to the Sprout's Sunday School teacher* about the test and another mom was sitting there at the table, and it turned out that she is one of the state's top autism advocates. She knows the system inside and out, it seems, and gave me her phone number so she can help us get a second opinion. She rattled off a huge list of names of people and procedures to follow. Then she invited me to come speak to a state congressional committee on autism that she is a part of somehow. My head was kind of spinning by that point. (I have serious doubts that I would speak at all. I'd misremember something and cause trouble somehow, I'm sure, but I might go listen sometime)


    *We just started attending this church in late July after a pretty long search for a place we felt at home. We're now attending catechism classes to be confirmed as Episcopalian.

    Leave a comment:


  • cherylswope
    replied
    Hi, Miah.

    Thanks for the update. How did the IEP meeting go for your oldest?

    Interesting development with the middle son. Keep us posted.

    Good news about your educational progress with your youngest! Did they provide you with any academic assessment?


    Perhaps your son will meet diagnostic criteria for ASD when he is a little older. This would depend on which characteristics he "lacks" for the DSM-V diagnosis. In the meantime, your plan to pursue OT sounds wise. Resources for children with Asperger's will still help you address behaviors, sensory issues, social skills, and other areas, given the specialist's conclusion that your son would qualify under the DSM-IV criteria.


    For an interesting comparison between the DSM-IV and the DSM-V:

    http://www.dsm5.org/Documents/change...to%20dsm-5.pdf

    For discussions on changes especially for children on the autism spectrum:

    www.autismspeaks.org, search "DSM-V"

    (For anyone else reading, you can ask your child's doctors and specialists how these changes affect your own children's diagnoses and access to services, if you have not already done so. The DSM-V appeared in May, 2013.)


    Thanks again, Miah. FSR by January sounds very good.


    Cheryl


    Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child

    Cheryl Swope, M.Ed., with Foreword by Dr. Gene Edward Veith
    www.memoriapress.com

    Leave a comment:


  • Miah
    started a topic Bit of update

    Bit of update

    The Sprout (age 5)

    The clinic called a few days ago and had a cancellation for today to have the diagnostic interview that they do as the first step in the process. So that happened today. The verbal results that I got today consisted of, "under the DSM IV he meets all the requirements for Asperger's Syndrome, but he doesn't quite meet all the requirements under the DSM V". Then he followed that up by saying we need to get him into OT for the sensory issues (which he thinks are contributing to the anxiety), and social skills group for the social skills issues, and had no clue how I was to accomplish those things with no diagnosis to wave through the red tape with. We actually had set up a local OT eval for a few weeks from now, so I guess we go through that and hope the OT can help us find a way through to the right wording to get him some help.

    We're at ten days of school, since we started late after our vacation and my gallbladder surgery (and several full days of dealing with the other boys' situation). He has been doing well with our calender center, and is getting better with being able to sit down for the work. We're still dealing with some perfectionism that is getting in the way of him being willing to write, but we're working on it. He recognizes all of the upper case letters now, and is starting to get sound associations for some of them, but can't write very many of them. He doesn't know very many lowercase yet. He adds and subtracts with answers up to ten, and finally almost has the teens worked out on counting. He may even be ready for FSR by January.


    The other two (12 and 13)

    Both of my older guys absolutely refused to do anything they were told. We tried various punishments, incentives, everything. They were completely steadfast that they were not going to participate in school, family, household, anything. The middle child was causing huge disruptions many hours of the day, interfering with the Sprout's schooling and his behavior. Finally, their dad stepped in and told them that they were going to do school, and if it wasn't going to be at home, then they'd go to school where at least the fact that they weren't doing any school work wasn't going to land us in truancy court. They both jumped at the offer, begging to be sent to public school. So, the middle child has been at public school for three days now. He hates the homework ("Seriously, they take my entire day and then give me homework!?!"), but loves the socializing.

    I'm actually a bit relieved at particularly the middle one being gone all day. I hadn't realized how resentful I had become toward him over his behaviors. So far his math teacher has sent home a note saying they run a "flipped classroom" where the kids are required to teach themselves the lessons at home while they do the homework problems at school (how ironic is that?) and the history teacher sent home a book on ancient Greece with lower reading level than D'Aulaire's Greek Myths, but told him to read 120 pages and make notes for a test tomorrow. I think he might finally be beginning to realize he wasn't right about everything.

    The oldest hasn't started yet. I have an IEP meeting with the school tomorrow regarding his placement. They seem to be willing to work with us. Much better than I expected by a long shot. I'm looking at the bright side here, that I can finally really focus on the Sprout's needs for a change, and he really responds well to the one on one. We still plan to keep homeschooling him.
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