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Which language for a high schooler?

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    Which language for a high schooler?

    Well, I am 75% of the way through Simply Classical and I'm very glad that I purchased it, despite my initial misgivings with the description. Even though I have been sold on classical education for my special needs kids, I have taken a lot of valuable information out of this book. One thing I wish I had done differently is not giving up on Latin with my oldest child. He started Latin a few years before his diagnosis at the age of 10 and with everything else being such a struggle, I let it drop from our curriculum.

    I am now looking to start a foreign language for him for high school credit. I consider him to be an 11th grader this coming year. His goal is to attend music school after he graduates, so he may not even need this language credit (we are waiting on the information from the school to determine their entrance requirements for homeschoolers). I have been planning to do Spanish, because we live in an area where Spanish is a very common language (and my son plays music at a church that has a large Spanish congregation).

    But now I'm wondering if Latin would be a better idea. The neuropsych who did my son's testing last year told us that he needed to keep his brain very active with logic and puzzles and things like that to keep the areas that were damaged by the seizures from regressing further, and to try to build that area (frontal lobe) back up. So would Latin be better than Spanish as a brain exercise? Or perhaps do Spanish for the practical language benefits and also do Latin for the brain benefits?

    If I choose to do Latin with him, which program would you suggest? I have been planning to use First Form Latin with my rising 6th grader (also autistic but no seizures, at least not yet). I'm not sure how my son would feel using the same program as his baby sister. My middle child (rising 9th grader with no special needs) is using Henle 1 this year, but I think that might be beyond my son unless we just took it very, very slowly - which I wouldn't mind.

    I'd love to know what the general consensus would be in this situation. Thanks so much!
    Jennifer
    Homeschooling since 2002

    #2
    Originally posted by Niffercoo View Post
    ...The neuropsych who did my son's testing last year told us that he needed to keep his brain very active with logic and puzzles and things like that to keep the areas that were damaged by the seizures from regressing further, and to try to build that area (frontal lobe) back up. So would Latin be better than Spanish as a brain exercise? Or perhaps do Spanish for the practical language benefits and also do Latin for the brain benefits?

    If I choose to do Latin with him, which program would you suggest? I have been planning to use First Form Latin with my rising 6th grader (also autistic but no seizures, at least not yet). I'm not sure how my son would feel using the same program as his baby sister. My middle child (rising 9th grader with no special needs) is using Henle 1 this year, but I think that might be beyond my son unless we just took it very, very slowly - which I wouldn't mind.

    I'd love to know what the general consensus would be in this situation. Thanks so much!

    Hi, Jennifer.

    My vote is Latin! For “brain exercise,” Latin will be perfect. My son once said something like, “Latin takes my boggled mind and sorts it out.” Also, Latin-derived languages, such as Spanish, will come much more easily after beginning with Latin. Given our children's difficulties with learning, unless your son loves to learn languages, I would only attempt one language at a time. Latin will be the more beneficial language to study initially. For reasons, inspiration, and encouragement, read Cheryl Lowe's articles on the topic, such as http://www.memoriapress.com/articles...-reasons-latin.

    Regarding the curriculum, perhaps you could ask your son for some input. Although he might not be allowed to make the final decision, he could indicate whether he prefer an easier, yet still comprehensive step-by-step program that he could learn alongside his sister or a more advanced and challenging program that would require more work and review on his part.

    Cheryl

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      #3
      Originally posted by cherylswope View Post

      Regarding the curriculum, perhaps you could ask your son for some input. Although he might not be allowed to make the final decision, he could indicate whether he prefer an easier, yet still comprehensive step-by-step program that he could learn alongside his sister or a more advanced and challenging program that would require more work and review on his part.

      Cheryl
      Thank you for your quick reply, Cheryl! I thought of another option. I could have my son use First Form and have my younger child use LC1. Or is LC1 not recommended any longer for kids her age. She finished Minimus Latin this year, very informally. She is a rising 6th grader, and doesn't have any LDs in addition to her autism.
      Jennifer
      Homeschooling since 2002

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Niffercoo View Post
        Thank you for your quick reply, Cheryl! I thought of another option. I could have my son use First Form and have my younger child use LC1. Or is LC1 not recommended any longer for kids her age. She finished Minimus Latin this year, very informally. She is a rising 6th grader, and doesn't have any LDs in addition to her autism.

        Good idea! When my twins were about your daughter's age, they enjoyed Minimus and transitioned easily to Latina Christiana I. If you do not mind teaching three different Latin programs at once, this could work well. [Your own mind will be challenged at the same time! ]

        Whichever you choose -- LC I, First Form, or Henle -- all three are good options. Keep us posted.

        I am very grateful to hear that you have benefited from Simply Classical. Thank you for sharing this.

        Cheryl


        Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child
        Cheryl Swope, M.Ed., with Foreword by Dr. Gene Edward Veith
        www.memoriapress.com

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by cherylswope View Post
          Good idea! When my twins were about your daughter's age, they enjoyed Minimus and transitioned easily to Latina Christiana I. If you do not mind teaching three different Latin programs at once, this could work well. [Your own mind will be challenged at the same time! ]

          Whichever you choose -- LC I, First Form, or Henle -- all three are good options. Keep us posted.
          Yeah, that is a little bit intimidating! LOL
          Jennifer
          Homeschooling since 2002

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