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Learning Disabled - Where to start Latin

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    Learning Disabled - Where to start Latin

    I homeschool my two daughters, ages 12 & 13, both with learning disabilities in the form of Auditory Processing disorder, one with both APD and other sensory issues!

    I have been researching Latin programs.

    I have avoided Latin thus far because of their academic challenges, but I do not want to keep putting off the teaching of Latin.

    Unless you could suggest otherwise, I am contemplating beginning with First Form Latin 1.

    Please advise as trying one more program that might prove TOO challenging and therefore going by the wayside with other curriculum is something I so want to avoid!!!

    Anyone else struggle with challenged kids? Am I wrong in that children with LD cannot be taught Latin and the rest of the Classical courses (logic, rhetoric). Tell me I'm wrong!

    #2
    Yeah, you're wrong.

    My experience is you can. My oldest son has APD and other sensory issues. I have been teaching him (modified) classically for the past 9 years. (I have not done Latin with mine because my husband has some strong feelings about not teaching it.) It has been a huge learning experience for me to learn what works for him and what does not. I cannot say I have done it perfectly or that he is 'on grade level', whatever that really means, in every area. But he loves to read, loves history, knows how to find the answer to any question he may have, and he feels he is a smart kid. That last one, to me, is the most important of all. I also have another son I am sure is the same. He is too much like Big Brother at the same age. Lucky for him, Big Brother was a good guinea pig so I have a better handle on what I am doing this time around.

    Cheryl Swope is writing a book about her experiences teaching her LD kids classically. MP is publishing it soon. I also know she is speaking at the MP Conference in a few weeks. I am hoping recordings of some sort will be possible for those of us not able to attend.

    But I digress. Back to your question: If it were me, I would not start with First Form. I would go with Latina I or even Prima and be prepared to go slowly and review often. Then again, your girls may surprise you. My experience has been APD and other LDs usually come with a brilliant mind. You just have to find the right key to unlock it.
    Last edited by Enigma; 05-28-2012, 01:59 AM.
    The Homeschool Grads:
    J- 6/96
    S- 11/98

    Still Homeschooling:
    G- 4/04
    D- 5/05
    F- 7/08 (my only girl)

    Future Homeschooler:
    M- 9/16

    Comment


      #3
      I completely agree with Enigma's response to you! I too, have a special needs son and we plan to educate him classically but we are having to 'modify' his education by slowing things down for him.
      I would recommend that you start with Prima or LC1. First Form definitely has its challenges and may be overwhelming for your child.
      Jenchick

      Comment


        #4
        Barbara,

        Definitely start with LC1 or Prima instead of First Form. The beauty of Latin is it's never too late to start and you can never review too much. I understand not wanting the disappointment of another program that is too challenging.

        "My experience has been APD and other LDs usually come with a brilliant mind. You just have to find the right key to unlock it."

        Enigma, I love this quote. Beautiful.
        Michael
        Memoria Press

        Comment


          #5
          Thanks, Michael.
          The Homeschool Grads:
          J- 6/96
          S- 11/98

          Still Homeschooling:
          G- 4/04
          D- 5/05
          F- 7/08 (my only girl)

          Future Homeschooler:
          M- 9/16

          Comment


            #6
            Learning Disabled

            Hi, Barbara. Tanya forwarded me your post this afternoon.

            Let me encourage you. My boy-girl teenage twins are both on the autism spectrum with sensory issues, and both have specific learning disabilities with academic challenges. They test 1-2%ile in auditory processing. (In other words of 100 children their age, 98-99 process information more quickly and readily than they do.) They also struggle with some daunting medical conditions. Nonetheless, they are progressing through Latin. In fact, my husband and I believe that the disciplined study of Latin has strengthened their minds. You can definitely do this.

            I started with Latina Christiana I, but if I were able to do it over, even if they were 12 and 13, I would have started with Prima Latina. A homeschooling friend of mine had us over for lunch one day, and when I read through her copy of Prima Latina, I thought, "That's what I should have done!" We needed SO much review and supplementation through Latina Christiana I, I had nearly written my own supplemental workbook of exercises by the time we finished. If you start with Prima, you'll likely be able to work at a pace closer to the one intended with its creation.

            A tip: if you have not already purchased the Latin-Centered Curriculum, you may want to consider doing so. This book helped me realize that Latin was not another "subject" I was adding in a burdensome way to our school day. Instead, Latin became the very foundation of our children's classical education.

            I would also encourage you to obtain all available MP supplemental helps for your girls. Having Latin at the core will help justify purchasing the materials, because some other "subjects," such as English Vocabulary, will soon become unnecessary to teach separately. The greater the aural/visual input you can provide in your Latin lessons (e.g., charts and flash cards), and the more ways you can integrate Latin into their day (e.g., the Lingua Angelica CD), the better they will be able to master the grammar in spite of their auditory processing difficulties. Even though my children are now 17, we still sometimes supplement aural recitations with visually-posted declensions and conjugations on the dry erase board in our kitchen.

            Will you be coming to the conference? We could talk more there....

            One final note, my kids have given me a brief sabbatical from direct teaching this semester to write the book Enigma mentioned. Over the weekend, our family was driving somewhere when from the backseat my daughter asked, "When will we study Latin again?" I said, "June 1st." She said, "Yippee!" and clapped her hands. My husband and I just smiled at each other.

            If you go slowly and enjoy Latin (and Logic and Rhetoric) in simple ways alongside them, they will learn and enjoy it too.
            Blessings to you--
            Cheryl

            Comment


              #7
              Struggling Student Forum

              Thanks to Brian and Tanya, we now have our own forum for K-12 students with special needs!

              Please locate this new forum if you have any questions, suggestions, or encouragement regarding children with specific learning disabilities, autism spectrum disorder, language impairments, or other difficulties.

              If possible, please post or add to your signature a brief introduction. I will serve as one of the moderators. We can all help each other.

              Cheryl

              classically homeschooling mom of 17yo adopted boy/girl twins:
              autism spectrum, specific learning disability, severe mental illness, mild cerebral palsy, medical conditions

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