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Spelling accommodations

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  • Spelling accommodations

    Hello Everyone! Hope your school year(s) are off to a good start if you are beginning this fall! It's always exciting starting out again 😀.

    My son, Charlie, is now approaching 12 years old and we are doing the 2-year paced SC levels 5 & 6. He has pretty significant dyslexia and dysgraphia and difficulty with eye tracking and jumps. He scores well on his spelling tests and sentence dictation, but really struggles when asked to write a random sentence. For comprehension questions in literature, he dictates the answer, then I write it on the white board while pointing out the proper spelling/punctuation, and then he copies two answers. For Latin, he just took the quiz for lesson 5 and scored 100 percent orally, but spelled about 50-60% of the English and/or Latin correctly (and this is after much repetition). We always fix all spelling errors, but both reading and writing continue to be time consuming. I am so thankful that he still has a great love of stories.

    Is it time to start making some accommodations for spelling? He started taking catechesis at our church school a few weeks ago and has been taking notes best as he can. Yesterday, we spent some time reading them (voice-to-text) into a google doc, edited it, enlarged it to size 16, printed it and dated it. He is slowly learning typing, but is only at about 9 WPM right now with 98% accuracy. He loves audio books and being read to, so we have a decent accommodation for reading. I do feel like his difficulties with writing hold him back quite a bit.

    Should I write a note for our Pastor (his catechesis teacher) explaining Charlie's difficulties and possible accommodation, such as taking tests orally or circling answers?

    He also doesn't use a paper/pencil planner. Is it time to introduce something like google calendar, or should we wait until he's older?

    Thank you for any input you can provide!

  • #2
    I would definitely work with his teacher to arrange accommodations. Our son got permission to do the workbook questions with me at home so he could dictate the answers while I scribed. They didn’t have notes or tests so I can’t speak to that part.

    What if he used the Curriculum Manual as his planner? Since everything is already written, he can focus on using different colored highlighters to plan with-mom work and independent work. If he has an activity to be aware of, he could draw a mini picture (like a soccer ball) or use a planner sticker to indicate it at the top or bottom of the CM. I’ve found it’s better to wait on tech-based solutions. There’s just too much that can go wrong even for the best of kids.
    Jennifer
    Blog: [url]www.seekingdelectare.com[/url]


    2023-2024
    DS20: MP grad; auto mechanic & business owner
    DS19: MP grad; college sophomore​
    DS17: Agricultural internship, Light to the Nations II (CTP)
    DS15 & DD13: mix of MP, online providers using MP materials, and non-MP science
    DD11: MP/SC, and online providers using MP materials
    DD8: mix of MP 1-3

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    • #3

      Kelly Jo, Jennifer already gave you sound advice. I would add that if you can speak to your pastor, this would be preferable to writing a note. When you speak with him, you can observe his reaction. Is he hesitant or unsure? Does he understand Charlie's diagnoses? Does he know that you are not laying all of the burden on the church, but that you will gladly work at home?

      I love Jen's idea of using the Curriculum Manual as the planner. This keeps everything in one place, where it already is! Simple planners may work best for both of you, as he grows older.

      Continue working on his typing. At this point, 9 wpm is not yet a strong advantage, but if he adds a typing course to his daily practice, the motor memory may accelerate his fluency in a way that is gratifying to him.

      My daughter encountered the same problems. For Latin, consider providing a word bank when necessary. I often wrote words on the board if she requested them. She knew the correct word; she only needed help with spelling. Similarly, for any blank drills (grammar, vocab), I wrote the first word(s) for her to copy.

      All of your home accommodations sound good!
      Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child (Memoria Press)

      SimplyClassical.com -- catalog, curriculum, book

      Comment


      • #4
        What if he used the Curriculum Manual as his planner? Since everything is already written, he can focus on using different colored highlighters to plan with-mom work and independent work. If he has an activity to be aware of, he could draw a mini picture (like a soccer ball) or use a planner sticker to indicate it at the top or bottom of the CM. I’ve found it’s better to wait on tech-based solutions. There’s just too much that can go wrong even for the best of kids. [/QUOTE]

        Great idea! Why reinvent the wheel? Thank you!

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank you, both!

          A word bank is an excellent idea. That might for for catechesis, too.

          Talking to Pastor sounds like a good idea. I stumble when I talk to people about it, but it is a skill that I need to grow in. Charlie understands his challenges, but I don't use the terms autism or ADHD with him (I do use the terms dyslexia, dysgraphia, and sensory differences). I suppose the latter three seem more legitimate and easier to explain. Should I talk to Charlie about the terms autism and ADHD?

          Thanks a million 💕

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Kelly Jo
            Should I talk to Charlie about the terms autism and ADHD?...
            If you mention those to your pastor, I would mention them to Charlie too. You may be correct that people are more knowledgeable -- and therefore possibly more compassionate -- about autism. Perhaps this has provided you with an important conversation with your son.

            If you speak to Charlie, remember that you do not need to share everything you know about autism & ADHD in one sitting! If he has questions, you may answer them. This discussion may become informative and eye-opening for him.

            Simply Classical: A Beautiful Education for Any Child (Memoria Press)

            SimplyClassical.com -- catalog, curriculum, book

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you, Cheryl! I appreciate this.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Kelly Jo
                Hello Everyone! Hope your school year(s) are off to a good start if you are beginning this fall! It's always exciting starting out again 😀.

                My son, Charlie, is now approaching 12 years old and we are doing the 2-year paced SC levels 5 & 6. He has pretty significant dyslexia and dysgraphia and difficulty with eye tracking and jumps. He scores well on his spelling tests and sentence dictation, but really struggles when asked to write a random sentence. For comprehension questions in literature, he dictates the answer, then I write it on the white board while pointing out the proper spelling/punctuation, and then he copies two answers. For Latin, he just took the quiz for lesson 5 and scored 100 percent orally, but spelled about 50-60% of the English and/or Latin correctly (and this is after much repetition). We always fix all spelling errors, but both reading and writing continue to be time consuming. I am so thankful that he still has a great love of stories.

                Is it time to start making some accommodations for spelling? He started taking catechesis at our church school a few weeks ago and has been taking notes best as he can. Yesterday, we spent some time reading them (voice-to-text) into a google doc, edited it, enlarged it to size 16, printed it and dated it. He is slowly learning typing, but is only at about 9 WPM right now with 98% accuracy. He loves audio books and being read to, so we have a decent accommodation for reading. I do feel like his difficulties with writing hold him back quite a bit.

                Should I write a note for our Pastor (his catechesis teacher) explaining Charlie's difficulties and possible accommodation, such as taking tests orally or circling answers?

                He also doesn't use a paper/pencil planner. Is it time to introduce something like google calendar, or should we wait until he's older?

                Thank you for any input you can provide!
                Hi Kelly Jo!

                This line jumped out at me --- has he ever been evaluated by a developmental optometrist? There are a couple of us here in the forums who have had children that have gone through vision therapy and found it to be very helpful.

                I would definitely reach out to your pastor and talk about working with him with some sort of accommodations. It's not uncommon to hear from mommas who've had struggles with their churches with regard to religious education classes, and it makes me sad.

                I would keep the note focused on what YOU are providing for him at home to help, and keep your requests for the classroom to what you need most. (preferential seating, written instruction, etc)
                2023-24 Year 13 of homeschooling with MP

                DD1 - 28 - college grad, bakery owner
                DD2 - 17 - SENIOR - HLCS Louisville, dual credit classes, theater, equestrian
                DS3 - 15 FRESHMAN - HLCS Louisville, soccer/tennis/aviation -dyslexia &dysgraphia
                DS4 - 15 - FRESHMAN -HLCS Louisville, soccer/tennis/aviation -auditory processing disorder
                DD5 - 11 - Mash up of SC levels and standard MP, HLCS Louisville - inattentive ADHD - equestrian & tumbling
                DS6 - 9- SC -- 2E cutie with dyslexia, dysgraphia &ADHD

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