Announcement

Collapse

Disclaimer - Read This First

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about medical and educational conditions and treatments. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.

The educational and medical information on this website is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Cheryl Swope, M.Ed. and Memoria Press make no representations or warranties in relation to the information on this website.

You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to medical advice from your doctor or individualized advice from any other professional healthcare or educational provider. If you think you or your child may be suffering from any medical condition you should seek immediate medical attention.

You should never delay seeking medical or educational advice, disregard medical or educational advice, or discontinue medical or educational treatment because of any information on this website.
See more
See less

The Reluctant Writer Strikes Again!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    The Reluctant Writer Strikes Again!

    G is going through a cycle where he will happily write answers in the guides but refuses to write anything else.

    He will not be going to college so how important is it I fight this battle?

    The Older Boys:
    J- 6/96: (CAPD/mild ASD) working/living on his own
    S- 11/98: Jan. 2022- BYU-I accounting major

    The Middle Boys:
    G- 4/04 (mild ASD/mild intellectual delay)
    D- 5/05 (mild processing issues)

    The Princess:
    F- 7/08

    The Youngest Boy:
    M- 9/16

    #2
    Fight the battle, whether you use CC or MP or something different. Work within his abilities, not his frustration level. That is an age where if the typing skills are there, you can accept assignments typed. My high-needs kid isn't your son's age, so I don't have a decade of experience upon which to draw, but I regret when I give ground. 90% of my job with that kid is holding the line. By God's grace....
    Mama of 2, teacher of 3
    SY 22/23
    6A, teaching TFL & CC Chreia/Maxim w/ Elementary Greek Year One
    MP2

    Completed MPK, MP1, MP2, 3A, 4A, 5A
    SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math)

    Comment


      #3
      I agree with you now that I have thought about it more. I’ve been going over his past curriculum lists looking at what he was most successful with. The trouble with that is, we haven’t had any real successful materials except the lessons I did based on Writing Skills by King. Since he is not compliant now, that will not fly. The second runner up will become too hard too fast.

      For G, the plan is to keep learning as long as I can get him to. He has pretty much hit the ceiling of his ability, though, so I’m looking at things we can repeat. For example, EGR for grammar. He can keep going over those 5 books for years gleaning more each time.

      The Older Boys:
      J- 6/96: (CAPD/mild ASD) working/living on his own
      S- 11/98: Jan. 2022- BYU-I accounting major

      The Middle Boys:
      G- 4/04 (mild ASD/mild intellectual delay)
      D- 5/05 (mild processing issues)

      The Princess:
      F- 7/08

      The Youngest Boy:
      M- 9/16

      Comment


        #4
        Forgive me for not knowing what you've done, but have you ever tried the Rod & Staff grammar books? I have levels 5, 6, 7 and 8, and there are quite a few writing prompts within them that we ignore (since we're supplementing for Latin and EGR).
        Mama of 2, teacher of 3
        SY 22/23
        6A, teaching TFL & CC Chreia/Maxim w/ Elementary Greek Year One
        MP2

        Completed MPK, MP1, MP2, 3A, 4A, 5A
        SC B, SC C, SC1 (Phonics/Math)

        Comment


          #5
          No apologies needed! Yes, we have tried some in the past, but he hates those. He’s done Hake 4-5 a couple times, but the spiral gets to be a mess.
          The Older Boys:
          J- 6/96: (CAPD/mild ASD) working/living on his own
          S- 11/98: Jan. 2022- BYU-I accounting major

          The Middle Boys:
          G- 4/04 (mild ASD/mild intellectual delay)
          D- 5/05 (mild processing issues)

          The Princess:
          F- 7/08

          The Youngest Boy:
          M- 9/16

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Enigma View Post
            I agree with you now that I have thought about it more. I’ve been going over his past curriculum lists looking at what he was most successful with. The trouble with that is, we haven’t had any real successful materials except the lessons I did based on Writing Skills by King. Since he is not compliant now, that will not fly. The second runner up will become too hard too fast.

            For G, the plan is to keep learning as long as I can get him to. He has pretty much hit the ceiling of his ability, though, so I’m looking at things we can repeat. For example, EGR for grammar. He can keep going over those 5 books for years gleaning more each time.
            This sounds like a good plan!

            A few additional ideas:

            - To brush up on the early basics of grammar and composition, he could review Core Skills: Language Arts 1 & 2. Our SC 4 plans combine these into a single course. We introduce a topic with CS:LA 1 and expand the depth of the topic with CS:LA 2. Example: He would review the basics of noun, common noun, proper noun with a few pages of CS:LA 1 and expand those topics with CS:LA 2. This would complement his EGR studies with a straightforward format he might appreciate.

            Other options:
            - Would he study Aesop? And does he know cursive? If yes, the Aesop Fables with Aesop Copybook Set gives writing exercises beyond copybook.
            - In SC Writing Two, he could complete the read-aloud edition alongside American history books he could read on his own. Or he could work through this with the Bible edition he could read independently..
            - EGP (English Grammar Practice)

            In all of these options (CS:LA 1&2 combined, the Aesop Set, SC Writing Two, and EGP, the font is larger, the exercises shorter, and the success higher than in some options he might find written for his chronological age. If nothing else, these will encourage him to put pencil to paper in accessible ways!

            If he is far beyond all of these, you might strongly consider Classical Composition: Fable. Even if you only complete a handful of the lessons, this format may appeal to his sense of autonomy, as he determines how he wants to rewrite these Fables. For many of our students with special needs, CC: Fable becomes a life-expanding turning point in writing.



             Sample The Aesop Copybook is a lovely companion to Aesop’s Fables that will strengthen your student’s writing and composition skills. Through the moral les

            Comment


              #7
              Update: I found a solution, but it isn’t an MP product so will go unnamed.

              Cheryl- I love the look of the Aesop set. He knows cursive, but says it is too hard to read so will not use it. I may recreate the book into manuscript using a blank composition book. I’m thinking about it.
              The Older Boys:
              J- 6/96: (CAPD/mild ASD) working/living on his own
              S- 11/98: Jan. 2022- BYU-I accounting major

              The Middle Boys:
              G- 4/04 (mild ASD/mild intellectual delay)
              D- 5/05 (mild processing issues)

              The Princess:
              F- 7/08

              The Youngest Boy:
              M- 9/16

              Comment

              Working...
              X