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Supporting the Desire for Independent Work

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    Supporting the Desire for Independent Work

    I have a child that wants to work as independently as possible. We looked at other curricula that are intended for independent study (ACE, CLE, Monarch, etc.). However, my daughter adamantly insisted that she wanted to stick with MP (which is what we preferred). I am here to work with her as much as she needs; we are just trying to allow her some space (which lowers her frustration level). Right now she has a desk with only essential posters up on the wall in front of her. She has a workbox system next to her desk. We keep a subject in each drawer, regardless of how much help she needs with the work. I write out her day's assignments on a sheet that I put on her desk. Then I put instructions in individual drawers or books as needed. For example, in her Rod and Staff English, I may leave a reminder that she should come and narrate the lesson to me after she reads it. She can check of work as it is completed. This systems works fine. The challenge that I run into is that MP isn't written to be done independently. I completely understand why...but I am trying to give her as much independence as I can without letting anything slip. Does anyone have any ideas regarding how to stick closely to MP's plans, while allowing for growing independence? or warnings on what to not let them walk off with? Just to clarify, I am not looking to cut any corners here- I am just trying to meet her need for growing independence. TIA!!!

    #2
    I think it just really depends on the child. My oldest could have done the R&S 4 assignments, mostly independently, but my son can not. So, for the R&S, I would at least a few times a week go over the oral drill questions with her, to be sure she is on the right track. It probably doesn't have to be every day. Is she doing Latin? Latin I found "teaching" 2 days a week like they do in MPOA or cottage school work well, and the other days are more independent. Again, this works for the girl, NOT the boy. On the flip side, my son can do the math very independently, but my daughter can not. For Christian Studies, we do read the Bible story together, but that is only 1 day week. I do the drill questions 1- 2 per week as well as the Bible verses. So, we do some Christian Studies everyday, but just a longer day on the first day. The independent time for the subject is reviewing the flashcards. Greek Myths is similar to Christian Studies, but we only do that 1x per week together. We do literature every other day...again, she studies the vocabulary on her own. On day one of the chapter, we go over the vocabulary and reading notes, but then she reads alone. Day 2 we do the questions. For math, we do a lot of the work together, drilling, etc following the teacher's guide and then she does the Review Exercises on her own. Does that help at all?
    Christine

    (2021/2022)
    DD1 8/23/09 - Mix of MP5 and MP6 (SFL, Birds, R&S 6 Math, Language Arts with Grandma)
    DS2 9/1/11 - MP4M
    DD3 2/9/13 -MP2/MP3

    Previous Years
    DD 1 (MPK, SC2 (with AAR), SC3, SC4, SC 5/6, MP4 + FFL and R&S Math 5, MPOA Fable
    DS2 (SCB, SCC, MPK, SC2/AAR/Storytime Treasures), Traditional Spelling 1, SC5/6 Year 1
    DD3 (SCA, SCB, Jr. K workbooks, soaking up from the others, MPK, AAR), MP1

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      #3
      howiecram Yes. Thank you. Part of my concern with some independent programs is that the parent might not catch it when a child isn't mastering material, or the child may not develop good study skills. I agree that you have to check the pulse on a regular basis. It feels a little tricky trying to give a child this young more independence in her studies, but she actually gets more done...and cries less. Thanks for the advise! By the way, how do you have your kids go over flashcards by themselves? My dd can memorize just fine, but a tall stack of flashcards, to do on her own, turns her into a puddle on the floor. So far, I have avoided giving her very many flashcards at one time. Ideas?

      Comment


        #4
        It sounds like you have a great system in place and a motivated learner -- what a win! (I am trying very much to get my kids to be more independent and it's hard going right now.)

        Would it be helpful to you both to have like a "morning meeting" each day where you review what she's accomplished on her own to give her praise on her successes as well as guidance about what's next in the curriculum? You could make it special with her favorite warm beverage. That also might be a good time to review a selection of her flash cards if doing them alone isn't working right now.

        Sometimes in reviewing flashcards, I don't sit opposite the child, but beside her and so I'm getting "quizzed" about the question at the same time instead of being the person with the right answer in front of her face. It's helped me learn my Latin verb endings. Or when the child remembers, but I don't, there's a healthy dose of "I beat Mom at that."

        Laura
        Laura H.

        DD: 15, special-needs: language processing issues (modified 7/8M Core), aspiring illustrator, our "Meg"
        DD: 13 (8M with SFL & NBO Fall 2021), aspiring pediatric nurse, our "Jo"
        DD: 8 (SC4 Fall 2021) our "Beth"
        DD: 8 (SC4 Fall 2021) our "Amy"

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          #5
          MarmeeLaura Thank you. We do have a morning meeting of sorts. I will try your flashcard idea!

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Jessica Louise View Post
            howiecram Yes. Thank you. Part of my concern with some independent programs is that the parent might not catch it when a child isn't mastering material, or the child may not develop good study skills. I agree that you have to check the pulse on a regular basis. It feels a little tricky trying to give a child this young more independence in her studies, but she actually gets more done...and cries less. Thanks for the advise! By the way, how do you have your kids go over flashcards by themselves? My dd can memorize just fine, but a tall stack of flashcards, to do on her own, turns her into a puddle on the floor. So far, I have avoided giving her very many flashcards at one time. Ideas?
            I love MarmeeLaura 's idea of a warm mug. That makes everything smoother in my house.

            I don't know if you're tech heavy in your house, but I actually added FMoR flashcards to an Alexa Blueprint (Amazon smart speaker) and my daughter reviews her flashcards that way, orally. We've had a couple of hiccups with Alexa being picky about pronunciation, but it works well for the most part with my daughter and frees me up to do laundry and such.

            Plans for 2021-22

            Year 11 of homeschooling with MP

            DD1 - 26 - Small Business owner with 2 locations
            DD2 - 15 - 10th grade - HLS Cottage School/MPOA/True North Academy/Vita Beata - equestrian
            DS3 - 13 -6A Cottage School - soccer/tennis -dyslexia and dysgraphia
            DS4 - 13 - 6A Cottage School -soccer -auditory processing disorder
            DD5 - 9 - 4A, Cottage School/MPOA -equestrian
            DS6 - 7 - MPK - first time at the Cottage School this fall!

            Comment


              #7
              Thank you, DiannaKennedy !

              Comment

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